The time is now to free Oscar López!

first_imgMore than 200 people marched across New York City’s Williamsburg Bridge Nov. 23 to demand freedom for Puerto Rican political prisoner, Oscar López Rivera. The 70-year old Rivera has already spent 32 years in federal prison, five years longer than Nelson Mandela’s time in apartheid jails. The Community Coalition for the freedom of Oscar López Rivera organized the march that coincided with a march of 50,000 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Among the speakers at the concluding rally were representatives of the Sundiata Acoli Freedom Campaign, Malcolm X Grassroots Movement, newly-elected Councilperson Antonio Reynoso and René Pérez Joglar from Calle 13 who called for the independence of Puerto Rico. — Stephen MilliesThe campaign to free Puerto Rican political prisoner Oscar López Rivera is reaching new heights with the Nov. 23 demonstrations in Puerto Rico and the U.S. The campaign and the demonstrations have had the solidarity of many organizations in many countries throughout the world.There are some crucial issues that unite the Puerto Rican people beyond any material possession. It has been demonstrated several times throughout history. The most recent examples were the struggle against the U.S. Navy in Vieques, which successfully kicked out the hated Pentagon, and the mass outpouring for the funeral of Macheteros Commander Filiberto Ojeda Ríos, viciously assassinated by FBI agents in his home.And in the mid-1970s, a similar campaign to free political prisoners Lolita Lebrón, Rafael Cancel Miranda, Irving Flores and Andrés Figueroa Cordero took place uniting, as the Campaign to Free Oscar is doing today, the people regardless of their political affiliation. It is a demonstration of national pride that says to the imperialist forces: Enough!Even if it is not consciously acknowledged, the meaning of this united front is the quest for sovereignty. How dare the U.S. keep one of our own imprisoned for 32 years, just for loving his country and wanting it free! López Rivera was never convicted of harming anyone.U.S. Congresswoman Nydia Velázquez said it bluntly during a press conference on Nov. 23: “President Barack Obama, how can you go to Egypt and talk about the unity of the people of the Middle East, when here in the USA we have a Puerto Rican in prison for loving his country?” The demand is to President Obama to sign a presidential order to free him.Many international personalities have demanded the freedom of Oscar López, including Desmond Tutu in South Africa and Rigoberta Menchú in Guatemala. In Puerto Rico, the voices that demand his liberation come from all sectors: politicians, artists, workers, students, athletes, businesspeople, religious leaders, LGBTQ activists, physicians, lawyers, intellectuals and others, including ex-governor, Aníbal Acevedo; current governor, Alejandro García Padilla; and several mayors. At the recent Latin Grammy Awards Ceremony, Puerto Rican singer Ricky Martin shouted after his performance: “Freedom and Justice for Oscar López!” showing the demand written on the palm of his hand.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Read More

Ag Secretary Perdue Visits Indiana State Fair

first_img Previous articleChapman’s and Demerly Pick Up Indiana Young Farmer HonorsNext articleRyan Martin’s Indiana Ag Forecast for August 9, 2017 Gary Truitt SHARE Ag Secretary Perdue Visits Indiana State Fair Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter SHARE Ag Secretary Perdue Visits Indiana State FairSecretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue came to the Hoosier state on Tuesday as he wrapped up his 5 state midwestern swing. After a stop at the Colts complex for an event with the Indiana dairy industry, it was on to the State Fair. The Secretary began his visit with a closed door meeting with top state officials,  including Governor Holcomb and Lt. Gov. Crouch, and with farmer leaders from most of Indiana’s farm organizations, state, and federal agencies.  It what was billed as a Farm Bill listening session. Following the hour long meeting, the Secretary told the media Indiana farmers told him they want a safety net that is market oriented, “We don’t want a safety net so high that farmers produce for the program.” He said the farm program should allow producers to make good economic and farming decisions and not make decisions just to qualify for government payments.Trade was another topic of discussion. Perdue made it clear the President is very supportive of agricultural trade, “The President feels that the U.S. economy is one of the largest consumers in the world and that we can get a better deal bilaterally, and that is what we are beginning to do.” Perdue said he will be traveling to Japan and Korea later this month and will begin to lay the groundwork for a new bilateral trade agreement.   “I have already been in Canada and Mexico and started the process of modernizing NAFTA, which has been very good for agriculture,” Perdue said.Most of those in the meeting that I spoke with came away impressed with Perdue and his knowledge of production agriculture. Randy Kron, Indiana Farm Bureau President, said the Secretary understands the importance of keeping crop insurance, “I sat next to him during lunch, and we discussed crop insurance at length.  He also addressed the issue during the listening session, so I feel he really understands the importance of crop insurance.” Kron added he felt Perdue was a down-to-earth person with whom agriculture could work.The importance of conservation was also covered in the meeting. The Secretary referenced it several times in his remarks to the media. Senator Todd Young, who also participated in the listening session, said the Secretary’s presence in Indiana sends a strong message to those writing the new Farm Bill, “It shows he is gathering input, not just from those in Washington but from those on the ground.”Perdue then toured the high tech Glass Barn where fair visitors can remotely tour a farming operation and thrashed some wheat with steam power at the Pioneer village.Hoosier Ag Today coverage of the Indiana State Fair is made possible by Indiana soybean farmers and their checkoff and by the American Dairy Association of Indiana, your Indiana dairy farmers. By Gary Truitt – Aug 9, 2017 Home Indiana Agriculture News Ag Secretary Perdue Visits Indiana State Fairlast_img read more

Read More

Green Party representatives welcome €17m in funding for walking and cycling…

first_imgCllr Brian Leddin, Green Party. Photo: Cian ReinhardtGREEN Party representatives welcome €17m in funding for walking and cycling projects for 2021 from the National Transport Authority across Limerick City and County.“This is delivering on a key commitment from the Green Party to deliver safe walking and cycling facilities across Limerick”, Brian Leddin TD noted.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “Projects such as new cycle facilities for the Ennis Road, Father Russell Road, and many other places throughout the city will make our roads safer and more healthy”.“As important as the cycling and footpath improvements in Annacotty, Roxboro and the Ballysimon Road are to communities, equally important is the maintenance of these facilities so they are safe to use.“This year Limerick City and County Council will be funded to source road sweepers that will be able to keep cycle lanes free of debris, and there is also funding for the physical protection of existing cycle facilities to make them safer”, commented Cllr Seán Hartigan.“I’m pleased to see funding to extend the cycle lane on Shannon Bridge towards the city centre, and funding for walking and cycling in Corbally, where residents have been calling out for safer facilities”, commented Cllr Sasa Novak.“It will be a challenge for Limerick City and County Council to deliver on all 57 projects funded for 2021 which is why Green Party Minister Eamon Ryan recently approved the funding of over 25 new staff to work on walking and cycling in Limerick.” she added. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Roisin Upton excited by “hockey talent coming through” in Limerick Print Linkedin Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash Twitter Advertisement TAGSKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick Post center_img Previous articleAdare Manor named 5th World’s Most Romantic Hotel 2021Next articleNew scheme to help hard-hit Limerick tourism operators Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Email Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live WhatsApp Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live LimerickNewsGreen Party representatives welcome €17m in funding for walking and cycling across Limerick City and CountyBy Staff Reporter – February 12, 2021 240 Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads last_img read more

Read More

Bon Secours Health System announces new private hospital for Limerick

first_imgNewsHealthLimerickBon Secours Health System announces new private hospital for LimerickBy Sarah Carr – March 3, 2021 1996 Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live BON Secours Health System (BSHS), the country’s largest private hospital operator, is to develop a new 150-bed medical facility in Limerick City. TAGSBon Secours HospitalKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick Post Email Bill Maher, Group CEO, BSHS said: “We are excited to be making what will be the single-biggest investment in medical care in Limerick for some time.  The region is the only one with no full-service private hospital and this development will bring new vital cardiology and other medical services to the Mid-West and Midlands.  As we did with Bon Secours Hospital Cork, where major new facilities have been developed in oncology, cardiology and other high-tech medicine, we will advance medical care in Limerick and expand it to the wider Mid-West community.”BSHS is the largest private hospital operator in the country, with 4,000 people delivering care.  The group has hospitals in Dublin (Glasnevin), Tralee, Cork and Galway.  In 2017, it acquired the 200-year-old Limerick city centre hospital Barringtons.  The acquisition put further impetus into Barringtons’ rejuvenation and ambitious growth plans saw an additional €4m investment by BSHS, bringing new services and improvements to the facility including its operating theatres.Having delivered on a five-year vision, Barringtons has grown considerably and now has capacity constraints in the current hospital with a limited 0.4-acre city-centre site. The plan for the new hospital addresses this and adds further much-needed services for Limerick.Jason Kenny, CEO, Bon Secours Hospital Limerick, welcomed the development of the new hospital and plans for the existing facility: “Barringtons’ future is secure in the Limerick community and as part of the BSHS 2025 Strategy, it will continue our mission to bring advanced medicine and exceptional care to a whole new level in the community, with the focus on ambulatory care once the new hospital opens.”   Roisin Upton excited by “hockey talent coming through” in Limerick Print The investment will be the single-biggest in medical care in Limerick and addresses a significant gap in medical services, with Limerick and the Mid-West being the only city and region in Ireland with no full-service private hospital. Previous articleGardaí make arrests after chaotic student street partyNext articleMunster confirm RG Snyman back running after injury layoff Sarah Carrhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Advertisement WhatsApp Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener REPRO FREE03/02/2021At the announcement of Bon Secours Health System’s plans to develop a new world-class 150 bed private hospital at Ballysimon today were L-R Paul Foley, Group Head of Supply Chain, Dr Siobhan Grimes, Clinical Director, Denis O’Sullivan, Group Capital Programme Manager and Jason Kenny, CEO. Pic Arthur Ellis. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Linkedin Twitter The commitment will also see specialities currently delivered at Bon Secours Hospital Limerick at Barringtons expanded, to include cardiology and other medical services, eliminating the need for patients to travel outside the region for these services.BSHS has purchased a 7-acre site at Ballysimon to the east of Limerick City, adjacent to financial services company Northern Trust’s facilities at City East Plaza.  Located at a key transport artery into Limerick, one kilometre from Junction 29 and the M7 Motorway, the site was selected for its ease of access for people travelling from other parts of the Mid-West and Midlands.Design of the new hospital has already commenced and a planning application will be lodged in the coming months. The site forms part of a wider development in the Towlerton part of Limerick City by Kirkland Investments which also includes a new secondary school (construction of which is due to commence in the summer), a hotel, offices and other commercial facilities.  A new road to facilitate the site development will be completed shortly.  BSHS is actively engaged with Kirkland Investments in refining the masterplan to include medical and other facilities on the site allied to the new hospital to make a world-class 21st century health campus.last_img read more

Read More

After delay, CDC releases new guidance on how states can safely reopen

first_imgsshepard/iStockBy ANNE FLAHERTY, BEN GITTELSON, and LIBBY CATHEY, ABC NEWSAfter weeks of delay, the federal government’s top experts on infectious diseases on Thursday released new, more detailed guidance on how states can safely allow businesses and schools to reopen their doors during the coronavirus pandemic.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance, while voluntary, is the most specific instruction yet from the federal government on how not to trigger an outbreak, as President Donald Trump pushes states to reopen and most have already started to do so.The guidelines, posted on the agency’s website, include ones designed for businesses and workplaces as well as for schools and childcare programs.The guidance includes various “decision tools” for specific institutions.For example, if a restaurant can answer “yes” to several questions — such as whether it’s prepared to encourage social distancing among patrons and encourage flexible leave among employees – than it could reopen safely.Another “decision tool” for youth programs and camps asks whether the program could stagger drop-offs and limit how often kids are mixed into groups, as well as having a plan if the children or employees get sick.The language in the guidance issued does not appear to be as prescriptive as a previous 63-page draft CDC document The Associated Press reported was “shelved” by the White House.That document called on restaurants to “provide physical guides” such as tape on the floors to ensure 6-feet of social distancing among patrons.The new guidance asks restaurant owners in general whether they can “encourage” social distancing and “enhance” spacing.It’s also likely that many of the questions posed in these CDC “decision tools” will be difficult for some communities to answer.For example, the guidance on reopening schools doesn’t tell a community what percentage of students should be tested or how many contract tracers employed.Instead, it starts with asking, “Is the school ready to protect children and employees at higher risk for severe illness?”Large parts of the country have been in lockdown for two months, as health officials have implored Americans to stay home, limit social contact and shop only for essentials.The new guidance came after weeks of impatient lawmakers and state officials insisting that they needed more detailed suggestions from the nation’s top infectious disease experts.“The point is, that America needs — and must have — the candid guidance of our best scientists, unfiltered, unedited, uncensored by President Trump for his political minions,” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said Wednesday on the Senate floor.The White House has previously pointed to an earlier plan as sufficient. That previous guidance suggested that certain institutions move forward once they can document fewer cases or positive tests in a 14-day period, among other recommendations.President Trump has repeatedly said states should make their own decisions on timing and how much testing is needed, and even encouraged schools resuming classes.“I think they should open the schools, absolutely. I think they should,” Trump told reporters this week. “And it’s had very little impact on young people.”That suggestion runs directly counter to recommendations by his top infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, who said the impact of children is still unknown.Fauci told Congress on Tuesday that states should resist the urge to reopen too soon.“There is a real risk that you will trigger an outbreak that you may not be able to control,” he told a Senate panel.In that same hearing Tuesday, CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield testified that the highly anticipated guidance would go online “soon,” to which Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., said “isn’t very helpful” as his and other states reopen — many without waiting for a 14-day downward trend in cases Fauci and others have warned is crucial in safely doing so.Addressing the delays, coronavirus response coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx said last week she was still working with the CDC on “edits.”“We’re working with the CDC on a whole series of products, from how to improve community mitigation, what to do about contact tracing, how to improve surveillance, and certainly these more detailed guidelines about child care and camps. Those are still being worked on. No one has stopped those guidelines. We’re still in editing,” Birx told CNN.When pressed on whether science or political and religious beliefs were guiding the process, Birx said, “Well, I like to believe that I’m a scientist, and I’ve been working with the CDC on the edits. It was more about simplification to really make sure that both the American people as well as public health officials understand the guidelines.”On the same day, another task force official defended the decision to not issue more detailed guidance earlier, saying that “overly specific instructions” would be counterproductive, and echoing President Trump that the onus is on the states to make case-by-case decisions they see as best for their communities.“On April 16, President Trump released guidelines for opening America up again. Those guidelines made clear that each State should open up in a safe and responsible way based on the data and response efforts in those individual states. Issuing overly specific instructions for how various types of businesses open up would be overly prescriptive and broad for the various circumstances States are experiencing throughout the country,” a task force official told ABC News last Thursday.White House press secretary Kaleigh McEnany has said twice in the last week that additional guidance was still “in the works” but “forthcoming,” while President Trump has ramped up his push to for the country to get back to work.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More

Coronavirus updates: Moderna says experimental vaccine is ‘generally safe’

first_imgMyriam Borzee/iStockBy MORGAN WINSOR, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 315,000 people worldwide.Over 4.7 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding the scope of their nations’ outbreaks.Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 1.4 million diagnosed cases and at least 89,564 deaths. Here’s how the news is developing Monday. All times Eastern:8:15 a.m.: Russia reports gradual declining trend in new casesRussia reported 8,926 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday, a new low in a gradual declining trend. The new cases confirmed over the past 24 hours bring Russia’s total to 290,678, according to the country’s coronavirus response headquarters. It’s the lowest number of new COVID-19 cases registered in a single day since May 1, when Russia reported 7,933 new infections. Russia has the second-largest national tally of COVID-19 cases in the world, behind the United States. The latest daily tally is down from a record 11,656 new infections on May 11. Last Thursday marked the end of a 12-day streak during which the country registered over 10,000 new cases per day.Russia also has one of the world’s fastest rates of new infections in the coronavirus pandemic, second only to the U.S. However, the nation’s death toll from the disease remains relatively low with just 91 new fatalities reported over the past 24 hours, bringing the nationwide total to 2,722, according to the coronavirus response headquarters. Moscow still has the bulk of the country’s infections, with 3,238 new cases registered in the capital over the past 24 hours. The city also reported 77 new deaths, a record single-day increase since the start of the pandemic.7:38 a.m.: Moderna says experimental vaccine is ‘generally safe,’ creates antibodiesAmerican biotechnology company Moderna announced Monday that its experimental vaccine for the novel coronavirus has so far shown to be “generally safe and well tolerated” in the first phase of a clinical trial. The vaccine, mRNA-1273, was the first COVID-19 vaccine candidate to be tested on humans in a clinical trail in the United States. Interim clinical data from phase one of the study also shows that mRNA-1273 produced the same or better antibody levels in participants as convalescent plasma, a century-old technique used for treating epidemics, according to a press release from Moderna.Earlier this month, Moderna announced that mRNA-127 had been cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to proceed to the next phase of a clinical trial. Phase two of the study is “expected to begin shortly,” according to the press release. The Massachusetts-based company said it is “finalizing the protocol” for phase three of the study, which is expected to begin in July.7:16 a.m.: Ireland takes first steps out of lockdownIreland took its first steps out of lockdown on Monday, with a small range of shops allowed to reopen and people permitted to meet in small groups.People can now go to hardware shops, garden centers, farmers’ markets and other outdoor retail spaces in the country, as well as opticians, vehicle repair shops, golf courses and tennis courts. Constructions sites also resumed work Monday. Other shops remain closed, likely for at least another three weeks. Bars and restaurants are not expected to reopen until the summer.People are urged to still only make trips to shops when it is essential, and those who can work from home must continue to do so.Members of the public are also allowed to meet with people outside their household starting Monday, but only in groups of no more than four and they must remain 2 meters apart. Officials have urged caution on the first day of eased restrictions, warning that the number of COVID-19 cases may rise as person-to-person contact increases.“We all need to approach the coming days with care and caution, and to show some collective cop-on,” Ireland’s health minister Simon Harris said Sunday night. “We want the shops to stay open, so there’s no need to rush down to your local DIY center or garden shop today.”Ireland recorded just 64 new cases of COVID-19 on Sunday — its lowest daily increase since March 16, around the time the Irish government began imposing restrictions. In total, the country has more than 24,000 diagnosed cases with at least 1,543 deaths, according to a count kept by Johns Hopkins University.6:34 a.m.: Vatican reopens St. Peter’s Basilica as Italy returns to relative normalitySaint Peter’s Basilica threw its doors open to visitors on Monday for the first time since March.Pope Francis inaugurated the full reopening of the world-famous basilica in Vatican City and held a private morning mass in the chapel for the 100th anniversary of the birth of Pope John Paul II. The basilica was then opened to the public for masses after the pope had left.Both Saint Peter’s Square and Saint Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City, an independent enclave surrounded by Rome, were closed to tourists after Italy’s prime minister imposed a lockdown across the entire country on March 9 because of the coronavirus pandemic. The basilica was cleaned and sanitized last week ahead of Monday’s reopening. All visitors must now wear face masks, sanitize their hands and maintain at least a 5-foot distance from others upon entering the site.Catholic churches across Italy also held public masses for the first time in over two months as the country continues to ease coronavirus-related restrictions. Meanwhile, shops, restaurants and hair salons reopened as most businesses resumed activities Monday.Once the worst-hit country in Europe, Italy was the first nation in the world to put a nationwide lockdown in place due to the pandemic. More than 225,000 people in Italy have been diagnosed with COVID-19 and at least 31,908 have died, according to a count kept by Johns Hopkins University.Italy began to slowly lift the strict lockdown earlier this month. The country’s economy is forecast to contract by at least 8% this year as a result of the epidemic.5:51 a.m.: France confirms 70 new cases in reopened schoolsAt least 70 new cases of COVID-19 have been detected in reopened schools in France as nearly 150,000 more children returned to classrooms on Monday, according to the country’s education minister Jean-Michel Blanquer.“Every time, or almost every time, these are cases that are declared outside of school,” Blanquer told French radio network RTL on Monday, adding that “it is inevitable” for there to be some cases found inside of school “but that remains the minority.”Last week, some 1.5 million elementary and primary school students — roughly one in every four — returned to class as France gradually emerges from a nationwide lockdown imposed to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. Blanquer noted that 70% of all students in the country continue to take classes at home, not at school. The French government is allowing parents to keep children at home amid fears prompted by the virus outbreak.The newly-detected cases in schools come as health officials identified a number of new clusters across the country, including 34 employees who tested positive for the virus at a slaughterhouse in Fleury-les-Aubrais, a commune in the Loiret department of north-central France.France is one of the worst-affected nations in Europe amid the coronavirus pandemic, with more than 179,000 diagnosed cases of COVID-19 and over 28,000 deaths, according to a count kept by Johns Hopkins University.4:57 a.m.: Wuhan nearly doubles number of COVID-19 tests per dayThe Chinese city of Wuhan, ground zero of the coronavirus pandemic, conducted 222,675 nucleic acid tests on Saturday, nearly doubling from the previous day, according to the local health authority.Last week, the Wuhan Municipal Health Commission announced a citywide campaign to test the entire population of 11 million residents for COVID-19 in an effort to search for asymptomatic carriers of the virus, after a cluster of new cases emerged for the first time since the city had lifted its strict lockdown on April 8.The number of tests conducted daily has increased from 113,609 last Friday and from 72,791 last Thursday. No confirmed cases of COVID-19 with symptoms were found during this testing period; however, 28 new asymptomatic carriers were identified, according to daily reports published by the Wuhan Municipal Health Commission.Although recommended, participation in the testing campaign is voluntary. Residents who were previously tested do not need to take part. It is not recommended to test children under the age of 6, according to the Wuhan Municipal Health Commission’s website. 3:40 a.m.: 13 sailors test positive again after returning to virus-hit USS Theodore RooseveltAt least 13 U.S. Navy sailors who were previously asymptomatic with COVID-19 have tested positive again after returning to the USS Theodore Roosevelt, a defense official told ABC News.Navy officials aren’t sure what’s going on as the sailors had all cleared the protocols to reboard the coronavirus-stricken ship — completing a 14-day quarantine and testing negative for the virus twice over the following four days. The sailors weren’t working together so it appears they didn’t infect each other aboard the ship, according to the defense official.It’s possible the tests are picking up remnants of the novel coronavirus in the sailors. But after being asymptomatic for almost three weeks, all 13 sailors are experiencing mild body aches and headaches. Those symptoms led to tests that showed they were all positive for COVID-19 a second time, the defense official said.When the first sailor described having the body aches and headaches, Navy medical teams urged previously positive and asymptomatic sailors to step forward if they were experiencing the same symptoms. Those who said they had the symptoms all tested positive for the virus again, according to the defense official.The mystery comes as more than 2,900 sailors have returned to the USS Theodore Roosevelt to prepare for its eventual departure from Guam. The 97,000-ton aircraft carrier was forced to dock at the strategic naval base on the U.S. island territory on March 27 due to a COVID-19 outbreak among the roughly 5,000 crew members.At least 940 sailors had tested positive and were immediately placed in isolation while the more than 4,000 who tested negative were quarantined in hotels and other facilities ashore. Some 700 sailors remained on board to deep clean the ship and run essential services before beginning their isolation period as crew members who were deemed virus-free took over, according to a press release in late April from the U.S. 7th Fleet.The Navy announced on Sunday night that the USS Theodore Roosevelt will now begin a “fast cruise” pier-side in Guam to simulate the ship’s operations at sea ahead of its departure, which appears to be imminent.Another defense official had told ABC News last week that one plan under consideration is to set sail without the full crew on board while still having the right number for all of the essential tasks.“After safely completing fast cruise, Theodore Roosevelt and its crew will be one step closer to going to sea to conduct carrier qualification flights for Carrier Air Wing 11,” the 7th Fleet said in a press release on Sunday. “The remainder of the crew will return to the ship following the air wing integration.” Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More

Brook makes first charity donation for anniversary

first_imgBrook Food Processing Equipment is marking its 25th anniversary this year by making 12 charitable donations.The equipment supplier has a host of celebratory activities planned throughout 2019, including making a £25 charity donation for every customer order over £1,000 that month.Brook said if January was anything to go by, it could donate around £20,000 over the year.January’s donation was £1,525 that went to local charity St Margaret’s Hospice, which provides high-quality responsive care to patients and their families facing life-limiting illness.Brook’s marketing director Ann Wells met with Sadie Ellison from St Margaret’s Hospice to present her and three of the nurses from the hospice with the cheque. “It’s an absolute honour to donate this money to St Margaret’s, they are all amazing people and doing something wonderful,” said Wells. “The care and compassion shown across the services they offer to our community is admirable.”last_img read more

Read More

Vulfpeck Announces Debut Performance At Madison Square Garden

first_imgVulfpeck is officially bringing their low-volume funk to one of music’s biggest stages: New York City’s iconic Madison Square Garden. The band’s MSG debut will go down on Saturday, September 28th. The show will feature support from another Vulf-related band, The Fearless Flyers, marking just their second-ever live performance.Tickets to Vulfpeck at Madison Square Garden will go on sale to the general public on Friday, February 1st at noon and will be available through Ticketmaster Charge By Phone (1-866-858-0008) and all Ticketmaster Outlets. Tickets will also be available in person on Saturday, February 2nd at the Madison Square Garden, Radio City Music Hall and Beacon Theatre box offices. For more information visit BoweryPresents.com.Vulfpeck has seen a quick rise to the top over the last few years, hitting some of the country’s most exciting music festivals and stages despite avoiding a traditional approach to touring. The Ann Arbor, MI-bred funk outfit experienced the majority of their early fame on the Internet in response to their clever music videos and unusual digital marketing. Since breaking into the international live music scene, the band—comprised of multi-instrumentalist Jack Stratton, bassist Joe Dart, keyboardist Woody Goss, and drummer/guitarist/vocalist Theo Katzman—has sold out headlining concerts worldwide, including almost all of their North American stops in 2017 and 2018 plus shows in Paris, Brussels, Amsterdam, Berlin, Glasgow, London, and Dublin. To call Vulfpeck a phenomenon is a huge understatement, as they’ve captured the respect and attention of most living funk lords today. Fans can also assume that regular touring members Cory Wong (guitar), Antwaun Stanley (vocals), and Joey Dosik (keyboards, saxophone) will be on hand for collaborations along with the rest of the band’s talented roster.Related: Vulfpeck Shares Video Of Recent “Dean Town” Collaboration With Chris Thile [Watch]This monumental gig for Vulfpeck is the latest step in the gradual world takeover they’ve waged over the last several years. In late 2018, Vulfpeck released their eighth full-length album, Hill Climber, which has been met with acclaim from fans and critics alike. As of now, the band has only one other performance on the schedule for their 2019 Wisdom of Crowds tour, though one that’s no less exciting—a sold-out Red Rocks blowout with support from Khruangbin and Cory Henry on Thursday, May 9th.last_img read more

Read More

For freshmen, food for thought

first_img Related As new freshmen spread through Harvard and the surrounding neighborhoods, food options do too, whether in dining halls, restaurants, late-night convenience stores, or departmental receptions. A Harvard dietitian has advice for students fully in charge of their diets for the first time: learn. Don’t worry too much, and remember that food is supposed to be enjoyable.Michelle Gallant, a nutritionist at Harvard University Health Services (HUHS), said students come to campus from such a wide range of countries, cultures, and culinary backgrounds that the common freshman dietary trend as the fall waxes and wanes may simply be that it’s time to be uncommon, that it’s a time of change.Food may be more abundant, less familiar, and more diverse than it was at home. Mealtimes may be different. Athletes have to make sure they’re eating right — and enough — to fuel their physical expenditures. There will also be new opportunities for social eating, and, with College students’ famously late bedtimes, there may be moments to squeeze in an extra meal, whether it’s needed or not.“It’s a tremendous transition time,” Gallant said.As a result, Gallant said that freshmen sometimes come to HUHS for advice on how to navigate the dining halls, how to fit unfamiliar foods into their diets, what to do about digestive concerns, or stressed over changing habits. In addition to formal office visits, she recommends that students stop by during “dinners with a dietitian” or other informational programs run in the dining halls, and that those with food allergies make sure to talk to their dining managers. Food for thought More than meals attract students to Harvard’s varied dining halls For those without specific health concerns, Gallant said it can be counterproductive to overanalyze diets, to count calories, to eat by focusing on a specific food group — whether to include or exclude it — or to embrace what she called “rule-based” eating. For example, she said, one popular diet restricts carbohydrates, but they are an important energy source for the brain.“It’s a balance,” Gallant said. “Enjoy food. Avoid skipping meals. Tune in to your body’s own signals of hunger and fullness. We’re trying to avoid rigid thinking about food.”With a population of high-achieving students, used to striving for academic perfection, too tight a focus on food rules can rob the joy from meals and potentially foster anxiety at the table.“Eating is one of life’s pleasures,” Gallant said. “Enjoying food means you’re well.”Harvard abounds with food-related resources, from Harvard University Dining Services’ (HUDS) “Recipes From Home” web form for those who want to share a favorite dish, to The Nutrition Source website at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health highlighting the latest dietary science, to a certified sports nutritionist available to counsel athletes, to the University’s Science and Cooking lecture series (kicking off Sept. 5), to the “Eaters Digest” newsletter from the Food Literacy Project, to a steady research drumbeat of scientific findings about diet and health.With all these available resources, Food Literacy Project manager Carolyn Chelius encouraged incoming freshmen to satisfy their curiosity about food and learn, in particular, about nutrition and availability — where and how food is grown — and its social and community aspects. The project itself consists of three areas: a paid student fellowship, a weekly farmer’s market on the Science Center plaza (Tuesdays from noon to 6 p.m.), and events and programs open to the public. The project also partners with the student-run community garden on Mount Auburn Street outside of Lowell House, whose produce is donated to local charities.Students interested in becoming more involved in such efforts can apply to be food literacy fellows, whose job Chelius said is to “learn more and engage their peer community on topics around the food system.” That mandate translates into organizing educational events and cooking demonstrations in the residence halls, attendance at other food-related events, such as tours of local farms and suppliers, and highlighting food-related issues on campus.“It’s important to learn as much as possible,” Chelius said.last_img read more

Read More

Annual hackathon promotes creative problem-solving

first_imgTeams of undergraduate students will design, create and present a digital application to improve the Notre Dame community in the fourth annual Hesburgh Library Hackathon this Friday, Saturday and Sunday.“We want this to be an inclusive event,” emerging technologies librarian and Hackathon co-chair Randy Harrison said. “It’s totally fine if this is your first experience with coding. We want students to see the resources in the library and see the library as a central hub for intellectual activity.”At its conception in 2016, the Hackathon drew about 20 participants. This year, the Hackathon is expected to register approximately 80-100 students and reward larger prizes, starting with $5,000 for first place. Students will register on Friday evening in the Hesburgh Library, form teams and start developing ideas for their app until the library closes at 11 p.m. Teams will continue creating their products when the library opens on Saturday until its closure at midnight. Competitors finalize projects and presentations Sunday morning. Lightning talks and judging will occur Sunday afternoon. The theme for this year’s event is “Synergy: Holistic Solutions for the Whole Student.” Through this framework, students will develop code, attend lightning tutorials and work together in diverse groups of two to four students that develop the app from start to finish. “As a first-year, Moreau helps you see the student as larger than just grades,” Harrison said. “This is a big part of the first-year curriculum. We complement this with the Hackathon, where students build apps towards that theme. They can make apps that help students find study buddies on campus and succeed as a student in the broadest term.”An integral objective of the Hackathon is to raise students’ awareness of the technology and resources that are available at the library. Additionally, Harrison said, the event will help increase students’ digital literacy and help them grow more apt at using the library as a tool for research. “Hackathons are great places for students to learn coding skills and work with other people,” Harrison said. “When you have the opportunity to get students involved in active learning and building stuff, you learn so much more than just a simple curriculum. You’re faced with real-world problems. It helps teach lateral thinking, which helps you figure out how to get around a wall once you’ve hit it.”The goals of the Hackathon include promoting scholarship and research, enhancing educational experiences and development, bolstering digital programs and services, transforming library spaces and building a culture of continual improvement and service quality. “What has changed since the beginning is our ability to fulfill these goals,” Harrison said. “When we ask teams to develop apps that help students here at Notre Dame, that goes back into the larger ecosystem of information and applications on campus. The library is just a part of that. The apps are about making campus and the world a better place. The information ecosystem becomes richer, and that gets back to the library.”Throughout the weekend, coaches are available to support student developers in strategy, coding mishaps, methodology, design and presentation practices. Judging on Sunday will evaluate five key areas of students’ projects: innovation, impact, usability, teamwork and presentation. The judges hail from several different disciplines across campus, such as RecSports, Information and Communications Technologies, digital collections and outreach. Presentations are expected to take under five minutes. After the competition is over, competitors will be provided with the chance to develop their apps further through the IDEA Center. Additionally, competitors have opportunities to further engage with the technology community through the South Bend Code School and other local hackathons. Competitors are “becoming-professionals,” Harrison said.“They’re doing everything a professional would do. They’re making things and putting them in front of other people,” he said. “We want a gamut of students because it’s a win for everyone involved — this Hackathon is valuable for all different types of people.”Tags: computer hacking, Computer science, technologylast_img read more

Read More