James Pendleton wins Putney development

first_imgHome » News » Land & New Homes » James Pendleton wins Putney development previous nextLand & New HomesJames Pendleton wins Putney developmentThe Negotiator28th June 20190399 Views James Pendleton is marketing The Thackeray Estate’s second ONE branded residential project in the heart of Putney, South West London. The remarkable building, featuring a striking curved white stone façade, was built by the Thackeray team to deliver 15 luxury two and three bedroom apartments.Situated on Putney High Street with a private entrance off Montserrat Road, ONE Putney occupies an unbeatable location with exceptional transport links, just moments from the river with a huge variety of shops and eateries right on its doorstep.We took inspiration from the original 1940s building and thought it would be fun to bring back some of the detail.Designed by PHASE3 Architecture and Design, the landmark building plays with interlocking volumes, reinterpreting the original structure in a new way, and has been built to a BREEAM Excellent standard. With stepped green roofs and meadow planting, car parking spaces for electric vehicles and discreet solar panels, the property is not only a highly desirable asset but environmentally conscious.Tyen Masten of PHASE3 Architecture and Design said, “We took inspiration from the original 1940s building and thought it would be fun to bring some of this detail back into the scheme.”Prices from £695,000 for two bed apartments.www.jamespendleton.co.ukPutney development Tyen Masten The Thackeray Estate’s second ONE branded residential project luxury apartments james pendleton June 28, 2019The NegotiatorWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more

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Shoe Fly Baby

first_imgShoe Fly Baby, the 2004 Asham Award short story anthology, is eclectic to say the least. Taking us from a London brothel, to a cancer ward, to a “utopian” state in which Ritalin is added to the water supply, these stories reflect a wide range of human experience. However, I would also argue that they vary in quality. While some of these stories stand out for their emotional intensity, stylistic sophistication or, in two cases, downright strangeness, others are less engaging and even banal. Nevertheless, the wide variety within this collection makes it an enjoyable read. The Asham Award, named for the house in Sussex where Virginia Woolf once lived, aims to encourage new female writers. One of the questions that this anthology left me with, however, is whether or not an anthology containing solely women writers is actually necessary. In addition to revealing their own experience, these authors are also just as deft at revealing the perspective of men. Rachael McGill’s ‘Butter Fish Parrot Fish’ shows us a man carrying his baby daughter into a pub, while Naomi Alderman’s ‘Gravity’ quite successfully narrates a man’s entire life in the span of 14 pages. The most impressive of these efforts to assume a new perspective is undoubtedly the First Prizewinning story by Victoria Briggs. Set in a North London brothel, ‘Shoe Fly Baby’ tells the story of Halim, who stares in awe at a shop window lined with trainers, and that of Debra, the prostitute who dances for him in five-inch heels. Repudiating any preconceptions the reader might have about power relations and victimisation, this story is strong and unsettling. In my opinion, it resonates quite well with Francine Stock’s ‘Antechamber’ in which a cancer patient tells us about her experience with strength, humour, and not the slightest trace of sentimentality. In a sharp contrast to this, Carey Jane Hardy’s ‘Face to Face’ takes on a tone of deep emotion as a woman most slowly come to terms with her loss of eyesight. Selected from over 900 entries, the stories in this collection are of high quality. And the wide range of stories offered by Shoe Fly Baby ensures that every reader is likely to find at least some appealing. While you probably will not like all of the stories in this collection, it undoubtedly a great way to spend an afternoon. Bloomsbury, Paperback, £6.99ARCHIVE: 0th week TT 2004last_img read more

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Live Cams Offer 24-Hour View of Ocean City From All Angles

first_imgHere are some other ways to keep tabs on the weather in real time:Ocean water temperature at Atlantic City’s Steel PierBay temperature and tide levels at the Bayside Center (Sixth and Bay) in Ocean City A live cam shows the ocean and beach looking north from the 14th Street Pier in Ocean City.A growing array of video cameras shows the surf, beaches, boardwalk and roads in Ocean City, and they provide live images of just about any part of the town.The cams offer vital information on weather and surf conditions on a barrier island that has a climate of its own. They deliver video across the Internet in real time to homes outside Ocean City — where the climate might be dramatically different, even short distances away from the ocean.Surfers have long relied on the cams to check wave conditions, but they now attract an audience of just about anybody interested in seeing Ocean City from afar.AtTheShore.com — a site for real estate resources on the Jersey Shore — continues to make major investments in its arsenal of cams. The company is adding locations and upgrading existing cams to high-definition equipment.The new HD cams allow users to enlarge to full-screen views without losing resolution:See HD stream from 14th Street PierSee same view from older camAt The Shore installed its first cams 20 years ago and now has more than 25, including new locations in Cape May and Sea Isle City.At The Shore works with Pro Video Engineering of Northfield and spends about $5,000 in setup on each cam, according to owner Jim Ginn. He said he’s invested tens of thousands of dollars in the cams, which are free for anybody to view.Why?“Because people want to see,” Ginn said. “If a picture is worth a thousand words, a video is worth a million.”He said the highest traffic to his cams comes not during beautiful summer weather but during any sort of bad-weather event.Ginn said he’s looking to add cams in Avalon, Atlantic City, Long Beach Island and then move south to Delaware.His cams and a set of others operated or sponsored by Ocean City surf shops cover a wide range of views of the island. Check them out here: CAPE MAYCape May LighthouseCape May CoveCape May Cove Beach View SEA ISLE CITYBeach and Promenade OCEAN CITY AtTheShore.com900 Block of Boardwalk9th Street Beach and Surf9th Street Boardwalk and Beach14th Street Fishing PierFrom 14th Street Fishing Pier Looking North Over OceanComplete List Including 19 Ocean City camsHeritage Surf ShopFourth Street SurfThe Surfers View/7th Street Surf ShopSecond Street SurfSeventh Street SurfSeventh Street Boardwalk11th Street Surf48th Street: Beach camlast_img read more

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Hooked on Houses : The Columbo Cottage

first_imgNestled under a breezy canopy of what are rumored to be some of the oldest trees on the island, rests Barb and Mike’s cozy 1950s newly revived cottage. The wrap around porch sets the scene with white rockers and a plush porch swing gently swaying in the breeze, calling one’s name for an after-beach nap.  Both Barb and Mike are retired school teachers from Pennsylvania who came to live in Ocean City full time in 2001.  The vibe of the home they have created is one of tranquility and relaxation.  Designed with entertaining friends in mind, Barb has also created the “Nanny and Pop” second floor for her two married sons and their families. This consists of two completely outfitted guest bedrooms.  Each guest bed has a skylight perfectly placed above for star gazing. From the soothing coastal blue walls, to the kitchen full of clean lines, then on to the newly covered deck with a classic tin roof,  every inch of this house could not be more well thought out.But the real story here is not the house, however, it is the history the house holds inside its walls. Vintage framed children’s bathing suits, straw beach hats, old beach signs, and wooden oars repurposed as drapery rods, adorn the walls.  Antique corbels from and old hotel in Atlantic City support a mantle style shelf in the dining area, while old iron grates from a basement in Philadelphia hang above and below.  Proudly placed on the front porch sits the full sized antique carousel horse. Gleaming in the corner of the living room is the cast iron mermaid torchiere light, buoys are being as doorstops, stained glass is hung instead of a typical roller shade, and vintage carved wooden birds float throughout.Barb and Mike’s eclectic collection creates a unique coastal themed environment both inside and out that would be hard to replicate. I would imagine it would be even harder to leave should you ever be invited to visit…To “Sea More” of this this home like SEA MORE with Maureen on Facebook, or follow me on Instagram seamorewithmaureen.  Do you have a house you would like to be featured this summer?Or send me an email @ [email protected]last_img read more

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New bread price war could spell ‘race to the bottom’

first_imgLoaves at 75p are at the front line of a new price war between the major multiples, which campaigners say threatens to become a “race to the bottom”.The Co-operative launched a new range of 75p own-label 800g loaves yesterday (24 April) as part of its new Value for Money campaign, highlighting the new products with TV advertising and the catchline: ‘Bread, it’s important, which is why we charge so little for it’.The move came a day after Tesco revealed it was cutting the price of an 800g wholemeal loaf from 90p to 75p, while Asda has reduced the price of its own-brand wholemeal loaf from 85p to 79p.”Race to the bottom”Pressure from the discounters, which have been taking market share from all the major supermarkets, is driving the latest round of price cuts – a trend that Chris Young, coordinator of the Real Bread Campaign, said was bad news for all bakers.“A new price war is starting up and the last time that happened in the 1990s, the price of a loaf fell to 7p, with supermarkets using bread as a loss leader to attract customers,” he said. “The problem with such a race to the bottom is that it artificially skews people’s perception of what is the ‘right’ price not only for a factory loaf but, by misplaced association, for ‘real bread’ as well.”last_img read more

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A study in contrast: Copley’s America, America’s Copley

first_imgHis paintings of national icons such as Paul Revere, John Hancock, and Samuel Adams cemented Boston-born artist John Singleton Copley’s connection to the American Revolution, and to the country’s cultural pride. “Today, in museums across America, Copley’s brilliant portraits evoke patriotic fervor and rebellious optimism,” writes Jane Kamensky in her new book, “A Revolution in Color: The World of John Singleton Copley.” But that connection was more complicated than it might now appear. In the spring of 1774 Copley sailed from Boston to London, never to return. When the fighting began, he followed it from an ocean away. Kamensky, a Harvard historian and Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Foundation Director of Radcliffe’s Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, notes in her book that Copley did not share the politics of his sitters and that his detachment from the conflict mirrored the divided sentiment among many in his homeland. “Like the paintings Copley produced so painstakingly,” she writes, “the revolutionary world was awash in an almost infinite spectrum of color. Allegiance came in many shades.”Kamensky spoke with the Gazette about the book and about the symbolism and significance behind some of Copley’s best-known works.GAZETTE: What surprised you in this research?KAMENSKY: What surprised me was the tension between the way that we know Copley and use him in the United States, and the way he understood his own life and work. We ask Copley’s paintings to illustrate, and for his sitters to embody, an understanding of Americanness that cuts against the grain of his America and the way he understood himself. His ironic distance from the patriots’ project opens up a much wider, and I think a more important question about the unaligned in the era of the American Revolution. We imagine it as a moment of the zealous choosing of sides — preferably the “right” side, our side. But Copley’s muddled detachment from that moment was pervasive. The best estimate is that anywhere from a third to three-fifths of the American people were these protean creatures of shifting alliance who did not particularly want the Revolution — or at least the fighting — to come to their state any time soon. If the balance of power shifted on the ground in their locality, they shifted with it. It gives us a very different view of the founding to have people like Copley at center stage. He is both unique — nobody else painted the way he did within 3,000 miles of Boston in the period that he was here — and like almost everybody. That combination made him larger than I realized.GAZETTE: One of his most well-known pieces is the portrait of Paul Revere that hangs in the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. To many it’s the iconic image of the American patriot, but you caution people not to conflate the sitter with the painter. Why?KAMENSKY: “Paul Revere” is certainly the most famous of Copley’s works, and probably the second-most famous face in Revolutionary America, a later version of George Washington being the first. Revere does a lot of work as an American character: He’s the guy who rolls up his sleeves and looks right at you and does nothing to disguise his artisanal work as anything but the elevating craft that it is. He doesn’t wear a wig, he doesn’t button his shirt, there’s not a bit of lace or frippery about him.By contrast, Copley’s self-portrait, done in late 1769, within roughly a year of “Revere,” could not be more different. He’s in a velvet waistcoat that’s clotted with lace, capped with a silk robe called a banyan that has a kind of oriental figure on it. His hair is meticulously powdered. There’s enough gold braid on his waistcoat for it to be almost a military uniform. He and Revere are like a peacock painting a hen. And I think that’s probably who they were in the streets of Boston, even though they were both artisans, at least until Copley married. They were both making about as much in a good year. They were both from immigrant families. But in the way that they fashioned themselves, Copley was a very different kind of guy. Everybody in the world that Copley and Revere grew up in would have called London home, with capital H. Not because they were from immigrant families but because it was the lodestar of their universe. Copley stayed that way, and Revere changed.A closeup of the fine detail Copley put into Dorothy Murray’s hands and bouquet. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerGAZETTE: Can you discuss some of the political and personal symbolism in what you’ve called your favorite Copley painting, “The Death of Major Peirson,” which depicts a brief battle on the Channel Island of Jersey between the English and the French?KAMENSKY: It’s a very surprising angle on the Revolution. Nobody knows that there was fighting in the Channel Islands. The battle took place when Britain’s war was nearly lost, in 1781. The war had been lost and the peace ratified by the time the painting was exhibited, in 1784. People even in London at the time had to be reminded about where Jersey was and why it was important. “Peirson” has that frisson of “What am I looking at?” because this is an American painter and the Redcoats are the heroes. It also has these two incredibly startling passages.One at the very center of the painting is a black servant in a military-style livery, a dark navy jacket with white silk lapels and three colors of ostrich plumes in his hat, who is heroically firing his musket to avenge the death of our hero, Major Peirson. That dashing black figure in this gorgeous costume acting violently in a way that is heroic I think is quite singular, and was quite edgy at the time. It’s Copley’s way of winking with his London audience at the hypocrisy of the United States about black liberty. In addition he’s got his wife and children off in the corner of the painting, uniting these worlds of war and family in a way that really speaks not only to his biography, but to the fact that the American Revolution/Britain’s American War was a civil war with rupture-producing consequences not just for men in arms. … It’s worth spending a long time with that picture.GAZETTE: “Watson and the Shark,” painted in London in the late 1770s, is widely considered Copley’s other masterpiece. Can you speak a bit to its significance?KAMENSKY: It’s not the first painting that he exhibited after arriving in London but it was the first painting that he exhibited that created celebrity.Brook Watson had been a merchant’s boy, probably a cabin boy at first and then an Atlantic coastal merchant, spending time in the waters of Havana where this happened to him in the 1740s. He was swimming and was flayed and nearly drowned. The incident allowed Copley to paint something that was incredibly suspenseful and that was exhibited at an incredible moment of national suspense about the fate of Britain.John Singleton Copley’s “Watson and the Shark,” 1778, oil on canvas. Courtesy of the Ferdinand Lammot Belin FundIt’s begun in 1777 exhibited in 1778, right at the moment that all of the London newspapers are talking about France entering the Revolutionary War. Spain was likely to come in next and as goes Spain so goes the fate of the English nation, because the weight of the French and Spanish navies together was almost undefeatable. So there’s a kind of hanging in the balance feeling around London, which turned out to be very fortuitous to Copley as he exhibited a painting set in Havana harbor, which England so briefly and meaningfully possessed at the end of the Seven Years’ War.So there was a vision of a greater English nation, when Havana belonged to England, that people can see in the picture. And then just the sense of not knowing how the scene turned out. People were caught mid-gasp in the way that they were in the war and there’s a kind of chiming back and forth between being in suspended animation in that painting and where the national psyche was when he exhibited it in London.GAZETTE: How do you think Copley would view his legacy?KAMENSKY: Copley thought that North America would one day become a truly great and central part of Britain and he wanted to be one of the founding figures of that version of America’s reputation, so he’d be glad about that — though his America was a region, not a nation. I think the alignment with the Revolution would really surprise him and that he would find the association of his career with “Revere” to be just astonishing. I don’t know what he thought of that painting. I can’t think he would have put it in his top 250. It’s a well-finished piece. It’s highly theatrical. It’s also small and cheap and not somebody with whom he was densely associated. I think he would be amazed.Jane Kamensky will discuss “A Revolution in Color: The World of John Singleton Copley”  on March 23 at 4:15 p.m. For more information, visit the Radcliffe website.last_img read more

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Cornel West’s ‘Prophetic Fightback’

first_imgIn August, Cornel West stood arm-in-arm with clergy members in Charlottesville, Va., singing “This Little Light of Mine” while white supremacist groups spat at them and shouted racial epithets.Just weeks later, the Harvard Divinity School Professor of the Practice of Public Philosophy recalled the courage he witnessed there, and how courage alone is not enough in the fight against hate.“I saw great courage in the eyes of my neo-Nazi brothers and sisters in Charlottesville when they stood in front of us and spat, and called names and racial epithets. I saw a lot of courage blazing in their eyes; unbelievable determination; a willingness to live and die,” West said. “But we need more than just courage. We need spiritual and moral dimensions that are tied to that courage. We need fortitude. We need greatness of character. We need magnanimity.”On Aug. 29, West delivered Harvard Divinity School’s Convocation address to the newest students to enter HDS, as well as hundreds of other people from the School, University community, and public who gathered on campus to hear him speak.Titled “Spiritual Blackout, Imperial Meltdown, Prophetic Fightback,” West’s speech protested the normalizing of mendacity, the naturalizing of criminality, and rewarding of indifference.“In this moment of spiritual blackout and imperial meltdown, begin with a critical historical inventory. Who are you really? How do you situate yourself in relation to traditions,” he said. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Court forces state to pay $6,000 in public records law decision

first_imgOn March 30, Washington County Superior Court Judge Geoffrey Crawford issued a decision to award attorney’s fees ‘in the amount of $5,400 plus costs of $626.44’ to the Vermont State Employees Association (VSEA). The decision stems from a January 6 decision by Crawford, ruling then that the State of Vermont was in violation of the law when it attempted to charge the union approximately $1,300 to view public records. Judge Crawford ruled that the State’s inspection fee “is plainly a financial impediment placed in the way of persons seeking access to records.”  In determining that the union was entitled to an attorney’s fee award, the Court noted, “The state’s position was not supported by the language of the statute, by its history, or by subsequent case law. It represented a statement of what the administration wished the statute to say rather than what it actually says.’‘The court’s ruling sends an important message to public officials that they could face direct financial consequences for wrongfully denying access to public records,’ said VSEA Associate General Counsel Abigail Winters, who brought the lawsuit against the State. ‘Because the State attempted to charge VSEA unlawful fees to review these public records’and the union had to take the administration to court to enforce our rights under the law’an attorney’s fee award is entirely just.’Winters added that VSEA has not been permitted to review the records, even though the Court ruled in January that the union was entitled to freely examine them.  ‘As a staunch supporter of access to public records in government, I applaud the decision by Judge Crawford,’ said Secretary of State Jim Condos. ‘At a time when our state is engaged in a vigorous discussion of ways to increase and encourage open government, including pending legislation H.73, I feel  it is important to remove unnecessary barriers to public access of state business.’Winters also warned that H. 73 (open records legislation currently making its way through the Legislature), contains a small but significant change to the public records act, which would allow the state and other public entities to begin charging fees to inspect records.  “VSEA believes this statutory change is a significant step away from government transparency,’ said Winters.  ‘It would enable government officials to create financial barriers to the public’s access to government records. Under the statutory change, an agency that does a poor job storing its records will be rewarded by being able to charge fees to a citizen who simply wanted to look at those records.” Condos said he also believes the Legislature should remove the language from H.73 before passage. ‘Vermont needs a culture change in regards to access to public records,’ Secretary Condos. ‘Free access to inspect public records was clearly intended by previous Legislatures and should be maintained.’ Source: VSEA. 4.4.2011 ###last_img read more

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7 money lessons from the super rich

first_img 30SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Contrary to popular belief, many of today’s multi-millionaires were not born into wealth. The recent U.S. Trust Insights on Wealth and Worth® survey discovered that 77% of those with investable assets of $3 million or greater grew up with average wealth at best (middle-class or below). A surprising 19% grew up in poor households.If they weren’t born into it, what is it about the wealthy that allows them to achieve and maintain that status? The survey highlighted common habits, including the seven important characteristics listed below.1. Investing for the Long-Term – The large majority of the multi-millionaires surveyed followed conservative investment strategies. Rather than try to time markets or engage in high-risk investments, they build wealth over time through buy-and-hold strategies and steady gains. This dovetails with a disciplined savings approach that inherently minimizes risk. You don’t achieve high net worth by blowing money with undisciplined spending. continue reading »last_img read more

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How consumers approach the many ways to pay

first_imgPeople want to pay their own way – and in their own time. That’s evident in the wide variety of options consumers use to manage their payments. Whether they use mobile or online bill pay, person-to-person (P2P) payments or even the occasional check, people want payment options that seamlessly fit how they live and work.Expectations & Experiences: Consumer Payments, the most recent quarterly consumer trends survey by Fiserv, found continuing shifts in mobile and online bill pay and other digital payment options. The survey, conducted by Harris Poll among 3,031 banking consumers in the U.S., highlights several trends.Digital Options Create OpportunityAdoption of online and mobile banking seem to be entry points to other digital services, including bill payment. As adoption and use of online and mobile banking increases, bill payments in those channels are expected to see corresponding gains. Seventy-four percent of online banking users take advantage of online bill pay, and 65 percent of mobile bankers use mobile bill pay. continue reading » 16SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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