Longtime Sports Broadcaster Irv Brown Has Passed Away

first_imgThe Denver Broncos running a play against the Cincinnati Bengals.DENVER, CO – NOVEMBER 19: The Denver Broncos run an offensive play against the Cincinnati Bengals in a general view as the sun sets at Sports Authority Field at Mile High on November 19, 2017 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Justin Edmonds/Getty Images)The world of sports broadcasting lost one of its true legends today following the passing of longtime Colorado sports personality Irv Brown at the age of 83.As iconic face in the city of Denver and the state of Colorado, Brown served as an NCAA basketball referee, a coach in baseball, basketball, and football, as well as a radio personality for over 40 years.Working alongside Joe Williams, Brown co-hosted the popular “The Irv and Joe Show” on Mile High Sports Radio for 25 years until his retirement in 2016.Per FOX Denver, Brown coached three sports at Arveda High School, baseball at the University of Colorado, and baseball at Metropolitan State University of Denver.We lost a Colorado icon today. Irv Brown – coach, ref, radio/TV raconteur. He worked for ESPN before it became the world leader. He practically invented sports talk radio here in Denver. He knew EVERYBODY. He helped EVERYBODY.We are forever indebted my friend. pic.twitter.com/MMSLhnnVrR— Vic Lombardi (@VicLombardi) February 3, 2019Brown also served as a basketball analyst for ESPN.Per Benjamin Albright, he was also the color commentator for ESPN’s first-ever college football broadcast, pitting Oregon against Colorado.Irv Brown, he was a legend.Pioneered sport talk radio in the 70’s, coached baseball at Colorado, refereed six NCAA Final Fours, was the color guy for the first broadcast of college football on ESPN (Oregon/Colorado), an NBA analyst for ESPN & a baseball exec.RIP pic.twitter.com/JdDjRpiIZE— Benjamin Allbright (@AllbrightNFL) February 3, 2019Among Brown’s accomplishments as a referee are the six Final Fours that he officiated, as well as five NCAA championship games.He oversaw three of John Wooden’s NCAA title wins with UCLA, and the 1976 title game between Indiana and Michigan, where the Hoosiers won 86-68, capping off a 32-0 season that remains the last undefeated NCAA title winner.In 1997, Brown was inducted into the Colorado Sports Hall of Fame.last_img read more

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Commercial Pressures Put OSV Crews at Risk

first_imgzoom Some 50% of crews working on offshore support vessels (OSVs) are willing to compromise safety rather than say ‘no’ to clients or senior management, while nearly 80% believe commercial pressures could influence the safety of their working practices, according to a report commissioned by operations and maintenance management software specialist Helm Operations.The findings from the report titled ‘The Impact of Crew Engagement and Organizational Culture on Maritime Safety in the Workboats and OSV Sectors’ were released to coincide with this week’s International Maritime Organization Maritime Safety Committee meeting.The report is the first maritime safety study specific to workboats and OSVs and will be finalized in time for World Maritime Day 2015, on September 26.The independent report will summarize six months of research by Dr Kate Pike and Emma Broadhurst of Southampton Solent University. It draws on original analysis of Port State Control detention records, feedback from 50 offshore companies, incident case studies, and input from leaders in best practice.”This is a major contribution to knowledge in the industry, highlighting the link between the human element and safety performance in this distinct sector,” said Ron deBruyne, CEO and Founder of Helm Operations.”It tests often repeated regulatory assumptions, establishes the realities of workboat and OSV safety, and provides key recommendations aimed at improving maritime safety.”Despite the inherently risky nature of their work, many workboats are not bound by SOLAS or the International Safety Management (ISM) Code. Both the Paris and the Tokyo Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) data show that 27% of workboat deficiencies relate to certificates and documentation, the report says.An online survey drawing on 50 key offshore companies saw 34% of respondents saying their company needed to offer additional operational and technical training.”We’re concerned that the research also confirms how under-reporting of near misses can undermine an entire safety culture,” said deBruyne.”This is partly due to the repercussions of reporting. Better safety management procedures, improved safety culture and crew wellbeing mean lower workboat and OSV deficiencies and detentions.”To support this contention, the report identifies a set of eight safety criteria to help companies establish safety management systems that follow the principles set out in the ISM Code. It offers recommendations on communication; empowerment of employees; feedback systems; mutual trust; problem identification; promotion of safety; responsiveness; and safety awareness.last_img read more

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Nonnationals may work up to 30 days per year without permit

Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedCaribbean News Round-upNovember 15, 2015In “Regional”Improvements planned for T&T prisonsJuly 14, 2017In “latest news”T&T Gov’t building profile on those going to SyriaAugust 3, 2016In “latest news” Hous­ing Min­is­ter Ed­mund Dil­lon(Trinidad Guardian) A non-na­tion­al of T&T can work in this coun­try for 30 days with­out a work per­mit for one time on­ly dur­ing a year, Hous­ing Min­is­ter Ed­mund Dil­lon has point­ed out.Dil­lon gave the in­for­ma­tion in the Sen­ate yes­ter­day fol­low­ing queries from Op­po­si­tion Sen­a­tor Wade Mark on what ac­tion was be­ing tak­en by Ude­cott against con­trac­tors who “open­ly flout” T&T’s Im­mi­gra­tion laws by con­tin­ued em­ploy­ment of non-na­tion­als with­out the rel­e­vant work per­mits.This fol­lowed yes­ter­day’s T&T Guardian ex­clu­sive which re­vealed some 70 work­ers had been fired from the Red House project be­cause they lacked work per­mits.Dil­lon said, “Ude­cott has tak­en an ini­tia­tive – where­by when the is­sue was brought to the pub­lic do­main – they wrote the con­trac­tors out­lin­ing the Im­mi­gra­tion laws re­gard­ing work per­mits. Ad­di­tion­al­ly, Ude­cott has done ran­dom checks at all their sites be­tween Ju­ly, Au­gust and this month and has as­sured me that to date there is no one on any of their sites – non-na­tion­als – with­out the rel­e­vant work per­mit.“I al­so want to put in­to the pub­lic do­main the Im­mi­gra­tion laws. You have to do a lot of in­ves­ti­ga­tion. Non-na­tion­als can come in­to this coun­try – as long as they de­clare to the Im­mi­gra­tion of­fi­cer – and they can work with­out a work per­mit for 30 days. They can do so for once in any one year. So there are peo­ple – non-na­tion­als – who can work for 30 days in this coun­try with­out a work per­mit.” read more

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