Boxship Runs Aground off Norway

first_imgzoom A Cyprus-flagged container ship ran aground in Skatestraumen, south of Maloy, Norway, on Thursday morning, October 22, according to the National Air Ambulance Services of Norway.The 700 TEU BF Fortaleza was sailing from Bergen to Rotterdam, the Netherlands, when it suffered steering failure and ran aground in rocky shallows.The 1996-built boxship reportedly suffered large hull breach in the midship area, after which an unknown amount of water leaked into its ballast tanks.Local Rescue Coordination Center dispatched a towboat and a helicopter to aid the grounded ship and assess the damage.The 121-meter-long BF Fortaleza was refloated and towed to Maloy the next day, where it still remains anchored according to AIS data.No injuries to the boxship’s crew of 12, and no oil spills have been reported.The BF Fortaleza is managed by the Hamburg-based Bf Management.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

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Warehouse Fire in Salé Kills Firefighter Injures Eight People

Rabat – A firefighter was killed and eight people were injured in a fire that broke out early Sunday in a timber warehouse in Sidi Moussa district in Salé, local authorities said.The fire caused the collapse of a building adjacent to the warehouse, local authorities pointed out, adding that firefighters managed to contain the fire and evacuate the residents of the damaged building.The injured were taken to the provincial hospital of Salé, while the state of one of the firefighters required his transfer to the military hospital of Rabat. MWN With MAP

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Facebook hits milestone – a billion people logged in on a single

Facebook hits milestone – a billion people logged in on a single day, 1/7 of world population NEW YORK, N.Y. – A billion people logged in to Facebook on a single day this week, marking the first time that many members used the world’s largest online social network in a 24-hour period. The number amounts to one-seventh of the Earth’s population.Monday’s milestone was mostly symbolic for Facebook, which boasts nearly 1.5 billion users who log in at least once a month. But CEO Mark Zuckerberg, who founded the network in his Harvard dorm room 11 years ago, reflected on the occasion with a post.“‘I’m so proud of our community for the progress we’ve made,” he wrote. “Our community stands for giving every person a voice, for promoting understanding and for including everyone in the opportunities of our modern world.”Facebook achieved 1 billion overall users in 2012, but this week’s milestone is perhaps more significant. It means the social network has become an essential service in many of our lives, a sort of online connective tissue that binds us to friends, family and even strangers who find themselves in similar circumstances. We need it daily, or more.Facebook has long sought to connect everyone in the world with its service. A lofty goal, it’s not so different from the three other tech superpowers that are changing commerce, communication and worming their way into every part of our lives. Apple has its gadgets, Amazon delivers our every physical need and Google, well, when was the last time you went a day without Google?(Google, incidentally, receives an average of 100 billion search requests per day, which makes it likely that more than a billion people use it daily.)Most of the billion people who logged in to Facebook on Monday were outside the U.S. and Canada. Of Facebook’s overall users, more than 83 per cent come from other countries. In a video posted Thursday, Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s chief operating officer, mulled what a billion really means.“Look closely, and you’ll see more than a number,” she said in the video, a montage showing Facebook users’ photos, posts and videos from all over the world. “It’s moms and little brothers and cousins and cousins of cousins. There’s Sam, Dante, Ingrid and Lawrence. It’s camping trips, religion … there’s likes, loves and unfortunately still some hate. Look past the number. You’ll find friendships.”As it grows, Facebook’s next billions of members will likely come from outside the U.S., from India, South America, Africa and perhaps even China, where the site is officially blocked.To help expand its flock, Facebook has been working to make its service easier to use on the basic, old-fashioned phones used in many parts of the world. It’s also working to get Internet access to the roughly two-thirds of the world’s population that is not yet connected — or about 5 billion people.Two years ago, Facebook launched Internet.org, a partnership with other tech giants that aims to improve Internet connectivity around the world. The group’s plans include developing cheaper smartphones and tools that would reduce the amount of data required to run apps, as well as working with telecommunications companies to provide basic, free Internet services. The effort has received some criticism for putting Facebook in the position of Internet “gatekeeper,” deciding what sites people can access and going against the spirit of “net neutrality.”Zuckerberg disagreed.“Net neutrality ensures network operators don’t discriminate by limiting access to services you want to use. It’s an essential part of the open Internet, and we are fully committed to it,” he wrote in April. “To give more people access to the Internet, it is useful to offer some service for free. If someone can’t afford to pay for connectivity, it is always better to have some access than none at all.”__AP Technology Writer Michael Liedtke contributed to this story from San Francisco. by Barbara Ortutay, The Associated Press Posted Aug 28, 2015 9:00 am MDT Last Updated Aug 28, 2015 at 1:00 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

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