Enhancements to the Health System Consumer Protection Measures Part of Fall Session

first_imgThe elimination of power walls to further discourage smoking, the introduction of midwives to the province’s team of health professionals, enhancements for the registered nurses profession and changes to the way pay day lenders can operate in Nova Scotia are just a few of the major amendments to legislation passed in the fall sitting of the legislature. “Significant changes to bills across the spectrum will bring about a heightened level of consumer protection, important changes for our health professionals and improvements to the election process,” Premier Rodney MacDonald said today, Nov. 23. Point-of-sale legislation, which will discourage Nova Scotians, particularly children and youth, from tobacco use, will prohibit cigarettes from being advertised and displayed prominently behind store counters. Exterior signage will also be eliminated. Only government authorized signage will be permitted at the point-of-sale. Effective March 2007, Nova Scotia will pull the plug on what are known as power walls. An act allowing midwives to become part of primary maternity care teams in Nova Scotia means Nova Scotia women and their families may get more access to maternity care. As well, a new Registered Nurses Act will better define the scope of practice and how nurses work with other health professionals. The act will eliminate the barriers facing nurse practitioners, while following national standards. This will enable them to work in collaboration with other health-care professionals, allowing them to make a diagnosis, order tests, and prescribe medications. Another bill passed will see a clarification of the definition of the scope of practice of licensed practical nurses, allowing them to work more independently with their patients. Changes to the Elections Act will improve election administration by expanding voting opportunities for Nova Scotians, enhancing the integrity of the electoral system, and correcting errors and ambiguities. Sweeping changes were also set in motion to change the way Nova Scotia political parties are financed. Changes to the Members and Public Employees Act await further hearings in Law Amendments, however, changes would mean that political donations will be subject to an annual ceiling of $5,000 per party. Political parties will get an annual grant tied to votes they receive in provincial elections. “These are vital changes to our electoral system and strike an important balance, strengthening the democratic process,” the premier said. “I look forward to seeing those changes move forward as soon as possible.” Fairness has also been introduced into the supplementary funding issue for Halifax Regional Municipality. Nova Scotia’s French-language school board, Conseil scolaire acadien provincial, will be assisted through a bill that clarifies the municipality’s authority to provide either a share of existing funding to Conseil acadien, or to provide additional funding, as it sees fit. Another important change for Nova Scotians involves an amendment to the Assessment Act continuing a cap for rising property assessments. However, with the passage of this bill, as of 2008, the cap would be tied to the Consumer Price Index. A bill ensuring the Utility and Review Board can grant only one power rate increase per 12-month period, unless there are exceptional circumstances, will help protect consumers and help businesses budget knowing this will not come more than once in a year. Legislation passed enables the province to enforce stricter guidelines and penalties on payday lenders and help protect their customers. The act will help to ensure greater protection to those people who need to borrow from the companies that make small, short-term loans. Other changes to legislation are as follows: The Provincial Court Act allows an out of province judge to be appointed to hear a case in provincial court, a particularly important option in the case of a French-language trial. The Motor Vehicle Act will give officials the authority to use the Ignition Interlock Program in the fight against drunk driving and related injuries and deaths on Nova Scotia roads. The Wind Turbine Facilities Municipal Taxation Act will assist the province’s renewable energy industry. The Securities Act protects Nova Scotia investors and harmonizes Nova Scotia securities regulation with others across Canada. “Once again, co-operation from all parties ensured the passage of 28 government bills through the legislature,” the premier said. “By working together, all parties also saw passage of a number of opposition bills.” Consultation will take place in the coming months on another significant piece of legislation introduced — the Health Facilities Licensing Act. The premier also announced during this sitting of the legislature a new minister responsible for military relations, recognizing and supporting Nova Scotia’s long-standing relationship with Canada’s military. The premier and minister hosted a Military Appreciation Rally mid-way through the sitting to thank the province’s Canadian Forces personnel who are currently serving as well as their families.last_img read more

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Boyfriend left Holby City actor John Michies daughter to die of drug overdose

Louella Fletcher-Michie and Ceon BroughtonCredit:Instagram Louella Fletcher-Michie and Ceon Broughton Sam Michie, Daisy Michie (Louella’s sister), John Michie, Carol Fletcher and Louella Fletcher-Michie pictured in 2015Credit:FameFlynet/Andy Barnes Prosecutor William Mousley QC said Broughton had been given a suspended sentence a month before the incident on September 10, 2017, and didn’t seek help for Ms Fletcher-Michie because he “didn’t want to be arrested”.  In August 2017 Broughton was given a 24-week prison sentence suspended for a year. The jury was not told what offence he had committed.Mr Mousley QC said: “Broughton knew that committing another offence would land him with 24 weeks, or possibly more, in jail.”Mr Mousley QC said “shockingly” Broughton “put his own liberty before her life” and said his “failure to get her treatment was borne out of selfishness and self-preservation”. Jurors were shown videos of dancer Ms Fletcher-Michie visibly distressed from the effects of 2C-P and heard Broughton had texted a friend saying “I can’t get bagged” in reference to being arrested. It is understood Ms Fletcher-Michie was the first known death from 2C-P. Broughton denies manslaughter and supplying Ms Fletcher-Michie with a class A drug.Broughton, of Enfield, London, has already admitted two counts of supplying class A drugs in relation to giving Ms Fletcher-Michie and her friend 2C-P at Glastonbury. Michie has now returned to Holby. The trial continues.The videos of a dying girlfriend Jurors were shown clips of the many recordings Broughton made using his mobile phone in the woods, showing Ms Fletcher-Michie heavily affected by the drug.She could be seen shouting loudly, repeating incoherent sentences and even hitting herself. In a police interview, Broughton said he “didn’t understand the gravity of the situation” and didn’t think it was “life or death”.A toxicology report revealed Ms Fletcher-Michie had 2C-P, ketamine and MDMA in her system. Mr Mousley QC said Louella was a “fit and healthy” dancer who worked abroad, rarely drank alcohol and enjoyed taking drugs recreationally at parties and festivals but was “always safe”.The opening from the prosecutionMr Mousley, opening the trial at Winchester Crown Court in Hampshire on Tuesday, said: “Less than an hour before her 25th birthday she died having taken a large dose, later described as an overdose by the defendant, from class A drug 2C-P, which he gave her.”Broughton was 28 at the time and he did not intend to cause the harm that he did and she willingly took it but it had a terrible effect on her. Mr Mousley QC said: “In the end Carol was so concerned she told her husband and they dropped everything to travel there from north London.”Ms Fletcher-Michie’s brother Sam also messaged Broughton urging him to get her help. “While he did communicate that he did have concerns through his phone he failed to take personal responsibility for a period of six hours.”Any reasonable person would have realised her life was in danger, had she been treated there is good reason to believe she would have recovered.”His failure to get her treatment, which alone would have saved her life, was borne out of selfishness and self-preservation.”He knew it would expose him to an arrest and criminal prosecution and that was at a time when he was subject of a suspended sentence, imposed just a month before.”The choice to put his own liberty before the life of a friend is a shocking indictment.” As worried Michie and his wife were dashing to Bestival they made calls to festival organisers and kept urging Broughton to get Ms Fletcher-Michie to medics.Around 10.30pm Ms Fletcher-Michie’s parents received a message from their daughter’s phone saying: “Can I call you later?”. Shortly after, Mr Mousley QC said Broughton text messaged his friend: “If her family ask, say a random gave us 2C-P.”Ms Fletcher-Michie died around an hour before Michie and his wife arrived at Bestival.By this time Broughton had left the wooded area. Michie handed his phone to organisers as it marked the GPS location of Broughton from an earlier message in their search to find Ms Fletcher-Michie.The ‘bumped up’ dose of 2C-PIn one message from Broughton to Ms Fletcher-Michie’s brother, the rapper said he “bumped it up a bit” in relation to her dose of 2C-P.The court heard the couple’s relationship broke down at the start of 2017 but they remained friends and Broughton supplied her and a friend 2C-P at Glastonbury Festival in 2017. Louella Fletcher-Michie Louella Fletcher-MichieCredit:Zoe Barling/PA “This led her to go through a terrible period of suffering in the woods by the festival, all while Broughton observed.”The drug he took did not have the same effect on him. It is not clear if she knew the strength of it or that it may well have been a cocktail of drugs but it was reckless from Broughton.”Worse still, he as her boyfriend was alone with her when they had the bad effects.”He had a responsibility to get her treatment which any reasonable and prudent person would have done. Holby City actor John Michie’s daughter was left to die by her rapper boyfriend at Bestival after he failed to get help because he “didn’t want to be arrested”, a court heard.  Louella Fletcher-Michie was supplied the hallucinogenic 2C-P by Ceon Broughton, who was on a suspended sentence, and he filmed her decline even after she had lost consciousness and died. Former Coronation Street star Mr Michie, 62, and his wife Carol Fletcher made a 130-mile journey to the music festival as their daughter was dying in a wooded area just 400m from medical facilities. She died an hour before they arrived. Jurors were told how Broughton gave her a “bumped up” dose of the class A substance and “failed to act” for six hours despite her needing urgent care, which would have given her a 90 per cent chance of survival, medical experts said. Instead of seeking help, the 29-year-old musician filmed Ms Fletcher-Michie on his mobile phone as her condition severely worsened, at one point recording for 51 minutes continuously. Broughton, who has recorded with top rap artists Skepta and Wiley, even filmed Ms Fletcher-Michie after she died, an hour before her 25th birthday.  Clips filmed at the start of the trip showed her repeatedly saying “this is the best trip I’ve ever had” as well as “call my mum this ain’t a joke”. Sam Michie, Daisy Michie (Louella's sister), John Michie, Carol Fletcher and Louella Fletcher-Michie pictured in 2015 Louella Fletcher-Michie and Ceon Broughton pictured togetherCredit:Instagram At one stage she can be heard shouting: “Trip up, magical monkey riding the forest… this is acid bruv.”She also shouted: “It’s mad that I’m having an acid trip and it can be this amazing.”She repeatedly yelled “call my mum” and at one stage shouted: “Call my mum, this is amazing, love you mum, love you grandma… I see through everything, I ain’t even joking.”During the footage, Broughton appears much quieter than Ms Fletcher-Michie and at times tells her to “put her phone away”.A family’s desperate scramble to save daughterBroughton ignored messages from worried Mr Michie and Ms Fletcher-Michie’s brother urging him to get help after he had spoken to Mrs Fletcher-Miche on the phone and she realised her daughter was unwell. Her mother had heard Ms Fletcher-Michie “screeching” in the background and said “she sounds crazy” following the call with Broughton, who later described Ms Fletcher-Michie as a “drama queen” in a text.Contact was made with Ms Fletcher-Michie’s parents around 7pm and Mrs Fletcher-Michie spoke to Broughton in an 11 minute phone call telling him to “get her help”. Louella Fletcher-Michie and Ceon Broughton pictured together Winchester Crown Court pictured on the opening morning of Ceon Broughton's trial Mr Mousley told jurors: “He filmed her when she was disturbed and seriously ill over a period of hours and even did so after she was dead.”It was only after her death that he finally left to speak to someone. They were 400 metres from the hospital on the site.”Throughout this period Louella does not appear to use her mobile and that’s because of the shocking state she was in.” Winchester Crown Court pictured on the opening morning of Ceon Broughton’s trialCredit:Solent Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

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