Taxi driver accused of murdering Goldfields manager remanded

Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedTaxi driver confesses to murdering Guyana Goldfields employeeMay 25, 2018In “Crime”Manager’s murder: Police seeking evidence as suspects have not confessedMay 24, 2018In “Crime”Taxi Driver allegedly caught with Marijuana remandedMay 14, 2014In “Crime” The 20-year-old taxi driver who was implicated in the murder of the Guyana Goldfields Inc manager was on Tuesday afternoon arraigned at the Georgetown Magistrates’ Court before Magistrate Leron Daly.Murdered: Neil WhyteAnthony Ragnauth, who said he is a mechanic, of Middle Road, East La Penitence was not allowed to plead to the indictable charge which stated that on May 21, 2018, at Thomas Street, he murdered Canadian Citizen, Neil Whyte.Attorney for the accused, Latchmie Rahamat told the Court that her client was badly beaten by Police ranks whom she alleged used a baton to squeeze his testicles. She said further that Ragnauth has not received any medical attention.The Magistrate granted a request for the defendant to receive medical attention.Bail application however, was rejected and the accused was remanded to prison until June 18, 2018.Prior to his court appearance, police reported that Ragnauth had confessed to the heinous crime and that the man also handed over the murder weapon to investigators as well as the victim’s valuables that were stolen from his Thomas Street, North Cummingsburg, Georgetown apartment.“The second suspect in custody has admitted committing the crime. He took investigators to a location at Fifth Street, Alberttown where he handed over several items belonging to the victim as well as a knife suspected to be the murder weapon” police said.INews had reported that on the evening in question, between 22:22h and 23:45h, Whyte was murdered in his apartment complex.The victim was discovered naked, lying in a pool of his own blood, on his bed, with his hands bound in front of him and his body was covered in stab wounds. The discovery was made by a security guard attached to the building.Moreover, Whyte’s laptop, cash, gold and other personal valuables were reported missing.Investigators were informed by the security guard that prior to his death, on the same evening, Whyte picked up and escorted a colleague into the apartment.The colleague was identified as a former staff of the Guyana Gold Field Inc.According to the guard, after some time had elapsed, and as the colleague was exiting the building, he [colleague] told him [security] that he was going to collect something on the road. At that time, the man had a haversack on his back.The colleague, then reportedly walked to the junction of Thomas and Middle Street, where he joined a car that drove away.It was then that the guard, knowing that it is the protocol of the company that the visitor of a guest be checked out of the building by the guest, went up to the victim’s room and saw him lying lifeless.The police were immediately contacted and the security guard provided his statement before he reportedly had a heart attack. He is said to be recovering.The colleague was then apprehended at his home for questioning. Shortly after, the taxi driver was also taken into custody.Meanwhile, a post mortem examination conducted on Whyte’s body confirmed that he died as a result of multiple stab wounds. read more

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CSIROs cyanidefree gold showcases nontoxic solution

first_imgCSIRO, Australia’s national science agency, has produced the country’s first gold using a non-toxic chemical process in an effort to provide an alternative to cyanide and mercury to extract the yellow metal.The first gold is the result of early industry trials of CSIRO’s ‘going for gold’ technology and was produced in partnership with small gold miner Eco Minerals Research at a demonstration plant in the Western Australian goldfields town of Menzies.Cyanide is used in more than 90% of global gold production, but producers are facing increasingly tough regulations that prevent or restrict its use due to environmental and health concerns. In response to recent spills of toxic cyanide, several regional agencies in the US, South America and Europe have banned the use of cyanide for gold extraction. This new technology replaces cyanide with thiosulphate, a non-toxic alternative, and a simple process flowsheet.It could be a game-changer for Eco Minerals Research which has its sights set on becoming the first Australian producer to go cyanide-free. “The first gold is a major milestone in our progress towards becoming one of the world’s first green gold producers,” Eco Minerals Research Managing Director Paul Hanna said. “In close collaboration with CSIRO we’ve gone through the design, engineering and fabrication stages and set up a processing facility in Menzies, delivering the first gold pour in just 10 months, which is a fantastic achievement.”The CSIRO research team behind the innovation has already had commercial success with another tailored cyanide-free gold solution developed with Barrick Gold specifically for their Goldstrike mine in Nevada where it has been used for nearly four years to maintain production rates.The A$2.1 million demonstration project was made possible through A$860,000 in funding from the Science and Industry Endowment fund (SIEF) and an Australian Government Innovation Connections grant.“Science enabling industry and environment to be partners not competitors, exactly as envisioned in our market vision – turning commodities into higher value, uniquely Australian products,” CSIRO Chief Executive Dr Larry Marshall said. “It has been accelerated through CSIRO’s ON program, and could be a game-changer for small gold producers or those looking to get ahead of increasing market demand for greener commodities.“Early industry trials like this are critical to innovation and go to the heart of CSIRO’s mission to tackle big, real-world challenges and unlock a better future for everyone.”To reduce economic barriers to entry for small producers and help turn stranded gold deposits into production, CSIRO’s vision is to deliver the alternative process technology direct to mine sites via a mobile service.A typical cyanide-based processing plant costs around $30 million, whereas the new technology has a lower capital investment costing as little as $2-2.5 million to build.The picture shows lead scientist Paul Breuer holding up a 1 oz commemorative gold ingot from the first gold pour using CSIRO’s cyanide-free process.last_img read more

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