Commercial Pressures Put OSV Crews at Risk

first_imgzoom Some 50% of crews working on offshore support vessels (OSVs) are willing to compromise safety rather than say ‘no’ to clients or senior management, while nearly 80% believe commercial pressures could influence the safety of their working practices, according to a report commissioned by operations and maintenance management software specialist Helm Operations.The findings from the report titled ‘The Impact of Crew Engagement and Organizational Culture on Maritime Safety in the Workboats and OSV Sectors’ were released to coincide with this week’s International Maritime Organization Maritime Safety Committee meeting.The report is the first maritime safety study specific to workboats and OSVs and will be finalized in time for World Maritime Day 2015, on September 26.The independent report will summarize six months of research by Dr Kate Pike and Emma Broadhurst of Southampton Solent University. It draws on original analysis of Port State Control detention records, feedback from 50 offshore companies, incident case studies, and input from leaders in best practice.”This is a major contribution to knowledge in the industry, highlighting the link between the human element and safety performance in this distinct sector,” said Ron deBruyne, CEO and Founder of Helm Operations.”It tests often repeated regulatory assumptions, establishes the realities of workboat and OSV safety, and provides key recommendations aimed at improving maritime safety.”Despite the inherently risky nature of their work, many workboats are not bound by SOLAS or the International Safety Management (ISM) Code. Both the Paris and the Tokyo Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) data show that 27% of workboat deficiencies relate to certificates and documentation, the report says.An online survey drawing on 50 key offshore companies saw 34% of respondents saying their company needed to offer additional operational and technical training.”We’re concerned that the research also confirms how under-reporting of near misses can undermine an entire safety culture,” said deBruyne.”This is partly due to the repercussions of reporting. Better safety management procedures, improved safety culture and crew wellbeing mean lower workboat and OSV deficiencies and detentions.”To support this contention, the report identifies a set of eight safety criteria to help companies establish safety management systems that follow the principles set out in the ISM Code. It offers recommendations on communication; empowerment of employees; feedback systems; mutual trust; problem identification; promotion of safety; responsiveness; and safety awareness.last_img read more

Read More

Indonesian mans body found inside python – police

Nia Kurniawan, from Brawijaya University, told BBC Indonesian that a python of this size would hunt for large prey, such as boars or wild dogs.While they normally avoid human settlements, they would see palm oil plantations as a good hunting ground, he said, as they attract animals like boars, primates or dogs.The reticulated python (Python reticulatus)Is the longest snake in the worldIs believed capable of reaching over 10m (32ft) in lengthThe longest in captivity is held in Kansas City, US, and measured 7.6m (25ft) in 2011, according to Guinness World RecordsLives in forestry, is normally fearful of humans and is rarely seenIs often treated as a sacred animal in parts of Indonesia when caughtIs one of dozens of python species, which are found in sub-Saharan Africa, Australia, Nepal, India, Sri Lanka, Burma, China, and Southeast Asia Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedIndonesian woman ‘held captive in cave for 15 years’August 7, 2018In “latest news”Indonesia earthquake: Huge surge in death tollSeptember 30, 2018In “latest news”Japanese police find 9 dismembered bodies in suburban apartmentOctober 31, 2017In “World” Police said they had cut the snake open and found the man inside (West Sulawesi Police)(BBC) A missing Indonesian man was found dead inside the body of a python, according to local police.Akbar went missing on Sunday on the island of Sulawesi, after leaving to harvest palm oil.In the search for the 25-year-old, police told BBC Indonesian that they had found a huge snake they suspected had swallowed the man.The reticulated python, reported to be 7m (23ft)-long, was cut open and the man’s body was found.Reticulated pythons are among the world’s longest reptiles and suffocate their victims before swallowing them whole.Pythons rarely kill and eat humans, although there are occasional reports of them swallowing young children or animals.(West Sulawesi Police photo)Mashura, a spokesperson for the police in West Sulawesi province told BBC Indonesian that villagers reported to police that Akbar had been missing for 24 hours.Police then conducted a search and found the snake near the family’s palm plantation.“They didn’t find him (Akbar), but the villagers saw an unmoving python in the ditch. They grew suspicious that maybe the snake had Akbar. When they cut it open, Akbar was inside the snake,” Mashura, who like many Indonesians goes by one name, said.Village secretary Salubiro Junaidi told The Jakarta Post: “People had heard cries from the palm grove the night before Akbar was found in the snake’s stomach.“When the snake was captured, the boots Akbar was wearing were clearly visible in the stomach of the snake.“Resident[s] cut open the belly of the snake and Akbar was lifeless.” read more

Read More