International Agribusiness Conference and Expo

first_imgAbout one in three acres of farmland in the U.S. is planted for the export market, and an increasing number of small- and medium-sized farmers are looking to augment their incomes with international sales, according to the Georgia Department of Economic Development’s International Trade Office. Participants at the 2013 International Agribusiness Conference and Expo will attend educational forums and workshops, learning from experts in agricultural importing and exporting and about the latest practices in processing value-added agricultural products. They also will have a chance to meet with international trade representatives. The conference’s main sponsor is Georgia Farm Bureau. For more information about the conference’s schedule, see www.iace.us.com. Early registration is $170 and ends July 30. For more information about the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, see www.caes.uga.edu. For more information about Georgia Southern University’s Division of Continuing Education, see ceps.georgiasouthern.edu. With agricultural products being among the state’s top exports, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and the Georgia Southern University Division of Continuing Education are teaming up to help farmers and businesses learn how to capitalize on the growing export market. The two institutions will host the 2013 International Agribusiness Conference and Expo on Sept. 25-26 in Savannah. The inaugural event will provide participants with information on what markets are open to their products, how to export their goods and what exporting can do for their bottom lines. “As the global economy continues to grow, Georgia producers are poised to take advantage of increasing demand for food and fiber products,” said Kent Wolfe, director of the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “Georgia can export poultry and cotton cheaper than Brazil, providing us a competitive advantage in shipping exports to Europe and China.” In 2012, Georgia exported $37.9 billion worth of goods. The state is the top exporter of U.S. poultry, pecans and wood pulp; and peanut exports are on the rise. About 39 percent of the shipments exported through the port of Savannah are agricultural products. “The forest products industry is a major economic engine for Georgia. It contributes nearly $25 billion in economic activity within the state and is responsible for more than $13 billion in exports,” said Alexander Koukoulas, president and CEO of the Georgia Southern University Herty Advanced Materials Development Center in Savannah. “Herty not only supports the pulp and paper industry, but it is in the forefront of the biomass-to-energy industry and has a 75-year history in developing new uses for bio-based materials. Our natural resources in biomass are second-to-none and present a huge opportunity for value creation.” last_img read more

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Pennsylvania Ranked ‘Most Improved’ for Animal Protection Laws

first_img January 24, 2018 Animal Welfare,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf announced today that Pennsylvania demonstrated marked improvements in two national organizations’ recently issued reports ranking all 50 states’ animal protection laws. Both the Humane Society of the United States and the Animal Legal Defense Fund report that Pennsylvania’s Act 10 of 2017, the animal abuse overhaul package that Governor Tom Wolf signed into law in June 2017, was a key reason why Pennsylvania’s rankings improved.“With the signing of Act 10 of 2017, we began to hold our pet and animal owners to a higher standard of humanity,” Governor Wolf said. “Recognition of Pennsylvania’s efforts by the Humane Society and Animal Legal Defense Fund confirms that my administration, our General Assembly, and strong advocates worked well together to establish laws that protect the pets and animals we love and whose care we have been entrusted with.”According to the Animal Legal Defense Fund report, “Best And Worst States For Animal Protection Laws,” Pennsylvania was the most improved state in 2017, jumping 20 places to number 24 on the list ranking the animal protection laws of all 50 states.The Animal Legal Defense Fund noted that “This achievement is thanks to major improvements like a new felony provision for first-time offenders of aggravated animal cruelty (including torture), and granting civil immunity to veterinarians who report suspected animal abuse.”For the tenth year in a row, Illinois ranked first, followed by Oregon, California, Maine, and Rhode Island.Pennsylvania’s position moved up from number 18 to 15 on the Humane Society of the United States’ Humane State Rankings.Animals are protected by a combination of state and local laws, which vary widely in terms of strength. Act 10 of 2017, Pennsylvania’s comprehensive animal protection law, was the first significant strengthening of Pennsylvania’s animal protection statutes in nearly 30 years.The package of bills included Libre’s Law, named after one dog whose shocking story of mistreatment and miraculous recovery helped spur a broader discussion of animal protection.Five key components of the legislation included improved tethering conditions for outside dogs, additional protections for horses, increased penalties for animal abuse, provisions that mandate that convicted animal abusers forfeit abused animals to a shelter, and granting civil immunity from lawsuits for licensed doctors of veterinary medicine, technicians, and assistants who report animal cruelty in good faith. Pennsylvania Ranked ‘Most Improved’ for Animal Protection Lawscenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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USC captures titles across the track at Pomona-Pitzer

first_imgA small group of USC track and field athletes competed solidly at this weekend’s Pomona-Pitzer Invitational, with Trojans on both the men’s and women’s team scoring first place finishes.Leaper · Sophomore Dalilah Muhammad won the high jump. – Tim Tran | Daily Trojan USC also posted collegiate-best marks in seven events at the meet in Claremont, Calif.Especially impressive was the performance of USC’s field athletes. Senior Colin Campbell won the men’s discus competition, and redshirt sophomore Lauren Guerrieri won the same event for the women.Sophomore Dalilah Muhammad, usually one of USC’s best hurdlers, competed in Saturday’s high jump competition and came away with first place, clearing a season-best 5-8 3/4 inches.Despite the late scratch of sophomore Duane Walker in the men’s 400-meter hurdles, the USC track athletes also had a memorable day at Pomona-Pitzer. Junior Brendan Ames honored his No. 1 seed in the men’s 110-meter hurdles by winning with a final time of 13.81 with a 2.1 meters per second backwind. The time was Ames’ best of the 2010 season.A pieced-together 4×100-meter relay team took home the gold for the Trojans, as the team of junior Sean Jackson, sophomores Scott DeYoung and Tony Burnett, and freshman Farzad Bozorgzad finished with a time of 41.72.Several Trojans fell just short of finishing first overall in their respective events. Junior Christine Cortez had a strong showing for the women’s distance team, coming in second overall in the 800-meter run with a time of 2:11.91, which was still good enough for the best collegiate time in the race.For the men, senior Jason Price also finished second overall but first collegiately in the 400-meter dash with a season-best 48.16.Next up for the Trojans are the Mount Sac Relays, a competition-heavy meet in Walnut, Calif., that earlier this week USC coach Ron Allice said was “one of the higher-profile meets on [the Trojans’] schedule.”last_img read more

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