The Forest Service is attacking the country’s most important conservation law

first_imgLast month, the U.S. Forest Service proposed new loopholes to NEPA that would  eliminate advance notice and comment for a host of potentially harmful projects, such as logging up to 4,200 acres at a time, building 5 miles of roads, or bulldozing 4 miles of utility corridors in national forests. At a time when “Fox guards henhouse” is a common headline, this proposal stands out as one of the worst. It would allow the Forest Service to sell off your favorite places for timber, and you wouldn’t know about it until it’s too late. Evans sympathizes with the Forest Service’s predicament, but says the data don’t support cutting out the public. “The Forest Service does struggle with timely project delivery, but its bottlenecks don’t come from its already-short 30-day comment windows. Its delays are caused by the lack of boots on the ground to look for things like rare species and design projects to protect them—what most of us would simply call doing a good job.” Unfortunately, Evans says, the agency’s proposed solution is to get rid of accountability. “If you get rid of public oversight, then nobody knows when you do a bad job. Nobody knows that you logged a stand on top of endangered salamanders.” What if you told your boss at your job that you didn’t want anyone looking over your shoulder? Well, we’re the Forest Service’s boss. We own these lands, and they work for us. We don’t have to go along with this proposal, and the Forest Service needs to hear from you. The comment period for the proposed Forest Service rules ends this Monday, August 26. Visit OurForestsOurVoice.org to comment and learn more. Speak now—it could be your last chance to do so. This isn’t just about tree-huggers having their say. Hunters, locals, recreational users, private landowners, historic preservationists, outdoor guides, city and county governments and tourism boards, Native American communities, and scientific experts will all be shut out of the Forest Service’s decision-making process. All of these groups provide important, on-the ground insights about the landscape that the understaffed Forest Service cannot possibly gather on its own. Why? The Forest Service saysthat the new loopholes will speed up their work. Without public comment andscientific input, they say they can conduct logging projects more quickly tohelp prevent wildfires. Nevertheless, the ForestService says that public input is just too time consuming. Its proposal arguesthat cutting out public input will shave up to 16 months from projecttimelines. An analysis based on Forest Service data obtained under the Freedomof Information Act (FOIA) by the Southern Environmental Law Center (SELC) showsthat eliminating public and scientific input does not actually make the ForestService operate more efficiently. Projects with public input and transparentanalysis actually require less timeper acre than projects developed behind closed doors. That’s because the publichappens to know a lot about the places they love—information that helps locateprojects in the right places for the right reasons. The Forest Service’s proposalis not really about efficiency, wildfires, or bureaucracy. It is primarily an attemptto eliminate accountability from public lands management. The Forest Service is proposing to cut the public from public lands. It’s doing so by gutting the most important conservation law on the books. A law that protects our national forests. You’ve probably heard of the Endangered Species Act, Clean Air Act, and Clean Water Act—all of which are also under attack by the current administration. But none of them are as important as NEPA—the National Environmental Policy Act. It sounds wonky and boring, but NEPA is the unsung, unheralded hero of conservation in this country. It’s the workhorse that gets the job done, mostly behind the scenes—like a football guard protecting his quarterback, or like R2D2, the robot from Star Wars, who doesn’t get a ton of screen time but almost singlehandedly saves the rebels and takes down the empire. Losing public accountability means losing old growth, losing rare wildlife and habitats, losing backcountry solitude, and losing clean streams and rivers. Over the past 11 years, 71 major logging projects have taken place in the six Southern Appalachian national forests in Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Georgia. All but one of these projects would have would have been exempt from public and scientific input under the proposed new rules. Thankfully, the existing NEPA rules required public and scientific input for all of them. As a direct result of the NEPA process, around 5,000 acres of commercial logging and associated road construction were dropped because they would have impacted resources like old-growth forests, rare species habitat, scenic views, and pristine trout streams, according to the SELC analysis of Forest Service data. In the Pisgah-Nantahala National Forest, at least 1 in 5 acres touched by Forest Service management were either added or removed from projects because of public input. “NEPA works, and the datashow it,” says Sam Evans, public lands attorney at SELC. “Forest Serviceprojects decisions are significantly improved by public and scientific input. Ifwe let the Forest Service gut its NEPA rules, none of those improvements wouldhappen in the future.”center_img National Forests in danger from U.S. Forest Service The proposed NEPA-nixing rules will hit Southern forests harder than any other region. More timber harvests occur here than anywhere else in the country, and essentially all of the logging projects in Southern Appalachian national forests would fit into the 4,200-acre loophole. Data provided by Southern Environmental Law Center Public Input on Forest Projects Nationwide Acres Added to and Dropped from Proposed Timber Projects due to Public Input in the Southern Appalachians This last point is a big one.The Forest Service is staffed by people who love these lands as much as we do.But they already don’t have the resources to do their jobs without mistakes,and they’re under tremendous pressure to put more logs on trucks. According torecords obtained through FOIA, the Forest Service is ratcheting up its timberquotas by 45%—levels of timber production our forests haven’t seen in decades. Atthe same time, the agency is proposing to cut 4,650 full time staff from itspayroll. More acres; less staff; more mistakes. Here’s how it works: beforemaking any decision that could harm water, air, wildlife, or any of the othervalues we depend on from our natural environment, government agencies must gatherinformation, explain their thinking, and accept public feedback. Simple, butcrucial. NEPA is especially important for an agency like the Forest Service,whose job is to balance a number of equally important values, from wildernessto water quality, to recreation, to economic uses like timber and grazing.Finding that balance requires doing the right things in the right places, whichis impossible without good science-based information and input from the peoplewho use and know the forests. Projects like commercial logging, roadconstruction, or clearcutting pipeline corridors, for example, can and dohappen on national forests, and they can be extremely harmful if they’re in thewrong places, like backcountry recreation areas, habitats for rare species, andprecious old growth forests. The explanation doesn’t holdwater. Less than a year ago, Congress gave the Forest Service a specialauthority for projects that would prevent wildfires and a new emergency fund sothey’ll have the money to get them done. The proposed loophole is much broaderthan that: it would allow logging for any purpose—even if it actually increasesfire risk by removing old, fire-resistant, and commercially valuable trees. last_img read more

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Berbatov: Man Utd  have found their new Ronaldo in Greenwood

first_img “They need to be really classy players to make the difference, someone who is going to be better than the current squad of players.” Greenwood has already made 40 appearances across all competitions for United this season, starting the last two. And it’s not just Berbatov he is impressing, with Solskjaer laying on the praise recently. “He’s getting better,” said the United boss. “You can see clearly that he’s maturing and improving, he’s only 18 still so we will see more from him. read also:Fortune amazed at Greenwood’s ability to use both feet “I’ve said it throughout the year that as long as we can get him faced up in and around the box he’ll create chances for us but in this game his hold-up play and his link-up play and general movement was fantastic as well. “It’s great when he can go inside and outside, both to his left and right. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 That’s according to former United frontman Dimitar Berbatov, who believes Solskjaer will find it difficult to improve on the likes of Greenwood even if the Norwegian boss is armed with a war chest heading into the summer transfer window. Greenwood started and scored in United’s last outing, a 3-0 win over Brighton on Tuesday, taking his tally to 13 across all competitions this season. And Berbatov saw a glimpse of superstar Ronaldo in the 18-year-old’s display. “Greenwood, against Brighton, was like Ronaldo,” the Bulgarian told Mirror Sport. “His left foot is unbelievable along with his vision, I don’t think many signings are needed to take United to that next level.Advertisement Ole Gunnar Solskjaer might have found Manchester United’s next Cristiano Ronaldo in Mason Greenwood.center_img Loading…last_img read more

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Vehicles older than 8 years will be disposed of – GRA

first_imgThe Guyana Revenue Authority (GRA) is reminding auto dealers of the new law restricting the importation of vehicles older than eight years.Government earlier this year announced legislative changes to the Customs Act that restricts the importation of vehicles that are eight years and older, from the date of manufacture to the date of importation, from entering Guyana. This new law took effect from May 1.However, despite notices to this effect already issued in the media, importers are still bringing the restricted vehicles.“The GRA therefore urges vehicle importers to desist from purchasing such vehicles and attempting to import same, since vehicles in contravention will be forfeited and disposed, thereof, in accordance with the provisions of the Customs Laws. Other fines and penalties may also be imposed,” stated a release from the taxation body on Tuesday.Meanwhile, Commissioner General of the GRA, Godfrey Statia, told Guyana Times that the Authority wanted to remind the public of the restriction, hence the release.“A few importers and individuals are still (importing such vehicles) and claiming ignorance so we just wanted to be pellucid that this is the law,” he remarked.Moreover, Statia explained that those importers who would have already purchased or had vehicles eight years and older at the wharf when the May 1 enforcement took effect, are given a “special concession”.The vehicle restriction does not apply to heavy-duty vehicles such as trucks, lorries, vehicles used in the agricultural and industrial sector and special purpose vehicles.The highly-unpopular measure was announced by Finance Minister Winston Jordan, during the presentation of the 2016 National Budget in January, which he said was part of the coalition Government’s programme of ‘greening’ the economy and protecting the environment.The ban, seen by many as anti-poor and anti-business, covers cars, vans, busses, Sports Utility Vehicles (SUVs), and pickups. The Government in the same vein had moved to remove the taxes on vehicles less than four years old as a cushion. The excise tax on 1500cc vehicles less than four years old was removed, while there was a 50 per cent reduction of the excise tax to 10 per cent on vehicles less than four years old between 1500cc and 2000cc.Several auto dealers had spoken to Guyana Times back when the announcement was made and noted that the ban will only benefit the upper-middle class and described the move as “jumbie economics” being implemented at a time when the Guyanese economy was struggling to “keep its head above water”.last_img read more

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