JPL – NASA Studying 2015 El Niño Event As Never Before

first_img Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Top of the News Community News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Business News Science and Technology JPL – NASA Studying 2015 El Niño Event As Never Before From STAFF REPORTS Published on Monday, October 19, 2015 | 3:45 pm 2 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Community News Herbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Bad To Give Your Boyfriend An Ultimatum?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThis Trend Looks Kind Of Cool!HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyRed Meat Is Dangerous And Here Is The ProofHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyShort On Time? 10-Minute Workouts Are Just What You NeedHerbeautyHerbeauty First Heatwave Expected Next Week center_img Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Make a comment Subscribe Every two to seven years, an unusually warm pool of water — sometimes 4 to 5 degrees Fahrenheit (2 to 3 degrees Celsius) higher than normal — develops across the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean to create a natural short-term climate change event. This warm condition, known as El Niño, affects the local aquatic environment, but also spurs extreme weather patterns around the world, from flooding in California to droughts in Australia. This winter, the 2015-16 El Niño event will be better observed from space than any previous El Niño.This year’s El Niño is already strong and appears likely to equal the event of 1997-98, the strongest El Niño on record, according to the World Meteorological Organization. All 19 of NASA’s current orbiting Earth-observing missions were launched after 1997. In the past two decades, NASA has made tremendous progress in gathering and analyzing data that help researchers understand more about the mechanics and global impacts of El Niño.“El Niño is a fascinating phenomenon because it has such far-reaching and diverse impacts. The fact that fires in Indonesia are linked with circulation patterns that influence rainfall over the United States shows how complex and interconnected the Earth system is,” said Lesley Ott, research meteorologist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland.Using NASA satellite observations in tandem with supercomputer processing power for modeling systems, scientists have a comprehensive suite of tools to analyze El Niño events and their global impacts as never before. Throughout this winter, NASA will share the latest scientific insights and imagery updates related to El Niño.For instance, scientists are learning how El Niño affects the year-to-year variability for fire seasons in the western United States, Amazon and Indonesia. El Niño may also affect the yearly variability of the ground-level pollutant ozone that severely affects human health. Researchers will be keenly focused on how the current El Niño will affect the drought in California.“We still have a lot to learn about these connections, and NASA’s suite of satellites will help us understand these processes in a new and deeper way,” said Ott.Many NASA satellites observe environmental factors that are associated with El Niño evolution and its impacts, including sea surface temperature, sea surface height, surface currents, atmospheric winds and ocean color. The joint NASA/NOAA/CNES/EUMETSAT Jason-2 satellite measures sea surface height, which is especially useful in quantifying the heat stored and released by the oceans during El Niño years.NASA satellites also help scientists see the global impact of El Niño. The warmer than normal eastern Pacific Ocean has far-reaching effects worldwide. These events spur disasters, such as fires and floods. They change storm tracks, cloud cover and other weather patterns, and they have devastating effects on fisheries and other industries.NASA’s Earth-observing satellites help monitor those and other impacts by measuring land and ocean conditions that both influence and are affected by El Niño. For instance, NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement mission provides worldwide precipitation measurements every three hours. NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive mission measures soil moisture in the top layer of land. Both of these satellites are useful for monitoring drought, improving flood warnings and watching crop and fishing industries.“NASA is at the forefront in providing key observations of El Niño and advancing our understanding of its role in shaping Earth’s weather and climate patterns,” said Duane Waliser, chief scientist of the Earth Science and Technology Directorate at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena.For NASA’s El Niño Watch page, visit:https://sealevel.jpl.nasa.gov/science/elninopdo/latestdata/ More Cool Stuff faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Your email address will not be published. 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Integrated analysis of intraspecific diversity in the bipolar moss Roaldia revoluta (Mitt.) P.E.A.S. Câmara & M. Carvalho-Silva (Bryophyta) in Antarctica

first_imgThe extreme conditions of life in Antarctica pose challenges to many organisms. Bryophytes comprise the main vegetation of the continent and they endure many adversities, thriving in an environment hostile to most living organisms. Mosses are known to exhibit phenotypic plasticity, due to genotypic heterogeneity, environmental influences, or a combination of both. We investigated morphological diversity and its possible relationship with genetic diversity in the Antarctic moss, Roaldia revoluta, and also if the geographic distribution of morphotypes was related with environmental variables. We obtained 49 samples from Antarctica, including King George Island (K), James Ross Island (J), and several locations in the Antarctic Peninsula (P), representing most of the habitats where this species is found. A principal component analysis (PCA) was performed using quantitative measures of gametophytic morphological characters. For molecular analyses, we used DNA sequences of five molecular markers obtained from 29 specimens. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was carried out to compare morphological diversity with environmental variables. Our data support the existence of two morphotypes of R. revoluta, morphotype A (apiculate and ovate leaves), more frequent in K, and morphotype B (acuminate and more oblong leaves), more common in J. Both morphotypes were present in P. The distinct morphotypes could not be related with genetic heterogeneity, since no sequence differences were found in any of the selected markers, supporting the morphological distinction being explained by environmental factors. The results from CCA supported a relationship between the observed morphological variation and the local environmental characteristics of wind speed and minimum temperature.last_img read more

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