Fire at eatery forces closure

first_imgPASADENA – An early morning fire Friday that damaged the front portion of Burger Continental will keep the more-than-40-year-old restaurant closed at least through this weekend, its owner said. A passer-by noticed smoke coming from the building at 535 S. Lake St. and called 9-1-1, Pasadena Fire Department about 12:50 a.m., spokeswoman Lisa Derderian said. Firefighters arrived within minutes and had the fire out by 1:20 a.m. However, the restaurant sustained significant damage to the walls, attic and roof in its front section, Derderian said. No injuries were reported, and the fire was contained to the restaurant. Six fire engines, three firetrucks, one ambulance, and one air utility were dispatched to the scene, she said. Owner Harry Hindoyan said, while the fire caused quite extensive damage, he plans to reopen as soon as possible. “Everything’s fine. We hope to be open by Monday,” he said. [email protected] (626) 578-6300, Ext. 4586 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.Firefighters used newly acquired technology to help douse the flames, she said. “We used our thermal-imaging cameras and found an extension of the fire inside the wall and were able mitigate it from spreading more,” she said. Adjacent buildings made of brick and concrete also helped keep the fire from spreading, she added. Pasadena police evacuated a grocery store behind the restaurant as a precaution during the fire, Derderian said. Officials preliminarily believe the fire began in the stove area in the kitchen, she said. last_img read more

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Did Old Metamorphic Rocks Form in Just 10 Years?

first_imgA discovery in Norway may collapse a geological process by five or six orders of magnitude.  A paper by Camacho et al. announced in Nature,1 yielded this comment by Simon Kelley (Open University, UK) in the same issue,2 “Conventional wisdom says that changes to crustal rocks pushed down deep when continents collide develop over millions of years.  But it seems that some metamorphism may be caused by tectonic events lasting only a decade” (emphasis added in all quotes).    The gist of the story is that certain rocks called eclogites, long thought to have formed slowly over millions of years, might have formed rapidly instead, maybe in only ten.  The authors of the paper deduced that they could not have remained at the temperatures assumed for very long without losing all their argon.  Kelley explains why the mixtures in the rock suggest conflicting requirements for their formation:The authors go on to estimate the temperature in the granulite lens during eclogite formation.  Their conclusion – less than 400 °C – is a problem for the conventional interpretation of these rocks, given that a temperature of around 700 °C is required for the formation of the adjacent eclogites.  Camacho et al. calculate that the total heating durations must have been around 18,000 years to explain the 40Ar-39Ar age profiles, but that individual fluid-flow events must have lasted just ten years to avoid significant heating of the granulite regions between the shear zones.  This model evokes a radically different picture of the conditions during eclogite formation; but any alternative explanation would have to invoke a mechanism that explains why these phlogopites retained argon despite exceeding temperatures at which the gas would normally escape.Kelley explains why the overturning of this classic case of a slow process points out an assumption that may need just as radical an overturn: “However, the very short timescales involved will make this idea controversial, as existing work on garnet seems to indicate processes operating on a million-year timescale; but also, perhaps, simply because we geologists are attuned to thinking in millions of years, whereas the features we observe may be just the aggregations of many shorter events.”1Camacho et al., “Short-lived orogenic cycles and the eclogitization of cold crust by spasmodic hot fluids,” Nature 35, 1191-1196 (30 June 2005) | doi: 10.1038/nature03643.2Simon Kelley, “Geophysics: Hot fluids and cold crusts,” Nature 435, 1171 (30 June 2005) | doi: 10.1038/4351171a.Now there was a daring and honest admission: perhaps geologists are just in the habit of throwing around millions of years, when the features they observe could just as well be “aggregations of many shorter events.”  Wow.  Think about that.  Here was a classic case of long ages from the Bergen Arcs in Norway that now must be reinterpreted.  Neither Kelley or Camacho are claiming that this formation came into being recently, but it represents, nevertheless, a monumental shift in thinking about geological processes in general.    Dr. Terry Mortenson did his PhD thesis on the origin of old-earth thinking.  He found that most scientists until the late 18th century believed the earth was young, and that the revisions upward to millions of years were due primarily to theological and philosophical attempts to discredit the early chapters of Genesis.  Darwin, of course, later found all that extra time essential for his theory of evolution.  Today, biologists and geologists don’t dare question the vast ages because Charlie needs the time: in fact, Darwin was aggravated to a pique when Lord Kelvin robbed him of the millions of years he required (see 02/02/2004 entry).  Geologists found ways to steal those years back using radiometric dating methods, and have relaxed in complacency with their textbook geologic column, mumbling out those millions & billions nonchalantly, without much challenge (at least among the Darwin Party brethren).  But what if (as many other dating methods suggest) things are really not that old?  Follow the chain links on Dating Methods for examples.  These articles in Nature, the most prestigious scientific journal in the world, should be a wake-up call for geologists not to take vast ages for granite (which, by the way, also shows evidence of rapid formation; see 12/07/2000 entry).(Visited 11 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Where Do Gems and Precious Metals Come From?

first_imgGold, diamonds, and other precious metals and gems… they are found close to the surface of the earth where humans can mine them and make jewelry.  But they shouldn’t be there.  Heavy elements should have sunk deep into the core of the Earth soon after it was formed.  Wait till you hear some of the latest ideas about how precious metals and gems arrived near the surface.  Maybe they shot up from the mantle.  Maybe they came from outer space. The fact is, geologists and planetary scientists don’t really understand why we have rare precious stones so accessible for man.  PhysOrg printed an article entitled, “Tackling mysteries about carbon, possible oil formation and more deep inside Earth.”  It’s about the Deep Carbon Observatory project destined to answer fundamental questions about the Earth’s interior.  Inside you will learn about how diamonds the size of potatoes shoot up from the mantle at 40 miles per hour, believe it or not.  However it happens, it’s convenient for miners, who otherwise would have to dig really, really deep holes to supply the wedding ring market. MSNBC posted an article about where gold comes from.  “There’s gold in them thar meteorites!” the headline blazes.  Jessica Marshall tells us, “Rocks pummeled Earth about 3.9 billion years ago, delivering precious metals.”  Gold, platinum, iridium, nickel, and tungsten are attracted to iron and should have followed it into the molten Earth’s core, she explained.  Meteorites to the rescue!  They came from space.  That’s right: “All the precious metals that we find today — and probably also water — have been introduced to the accessible Earth from these late-stage meteorites.”  Maybe they even brought life!  Figure that suggestion out after reading that the bombardment was probably “a terrible event for life” that “probably would have melted the planet, blown off any existing atmosphere.” Marshall used the new theory to bolster an old idea called the Late Heavy Bombardment.  She reported a new study about tungsten isotope measurements to support the idea of a swarm of big meteors hitting Earth and the moon 3.8 and 4 billion years ago, but the obvious subtext is the ignorance of geologists about earth history.  “Geologists have posed several theories to explain this puzzle,” she noted about precious metals.  Careful reading shows the Late Heavy Bombardment to be only an idea, a suggestion.  Interesting as isotope comparisons are, they don’t provide a time machine.  And saying that the age of Earth’s tungsten matches the dates of craters on the moon calibrates two questionable dates against each other.  Nothing in the article provides evidence that meteorites are made of gold.  It seems to move the question of the origin of precious metals from one body to another. When all else fails, bring in a meteorite.  When you can’t explain the moon, bring in a Mars-size meteorite to blast the Earth.  When you can’t explain Earth’s oceans, imagine a giant water balloon comet to bring it special delivery.  Meteor crashes are too convenient; they are the imaginary can openers that open any can for the hungry hobos.  “Assume a can opener” makes the rest easy.  Assume a meteor.  Need water?  Bring in a water meteor or comet.  Need gold?  Send in a gold meteor.  Imaginary theory-saving devices to the rescue!  Try that with your credit card debt.(Visited 425 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Empowerment paddling in Knysna

first_img17 August 2005The Paddle Cruiser, South Africa’s only paddle-driven ship – and the Western Cape coastal town of Knysna’s newest tourist attraction – is proving a model for black economic empowerment.“We knew from the start that the vessel would have to be managed by a crew of highly skilled and dedicated people,” says William Smith, director of the Featherbed Company, which owns and operates the Paddle Cruiser.“But the problem was that South Africa had never had a vessel like this one – so we had to train new people from scratch.“We recruited and began training the boat’s managers – the men who would become its skippers – while it was still under construction,” says Smith. “Because we’re good corporate citizens, we made sure the successful candidates came from previously disadvantaged backgrounds.”Neither Floyd Herwels nor Stanley van Rooyen had had any maritime experience when they started with the Featherbed Company, but both have taken to life afloat with gusto.“I applied for the job because I wanted a change from the admin work I was doing for an insurance company,” says Van Rooyen. “And I took it on because it was a challenge.“Our training took nearly two years and earned me a Class 6 port operations license – a qualification recognised around the world.”Van Rooyen and Herwels are now equipped to take responsibility for the safety and smooth operation of the vessel and for the comfort of its passengers. This they do at least twice a day, almost every day of the year.The Paddle Cruiser experienceBuilt over a period of 18 months by Two Oceans Marine Manufacturing and launched in Cape Town in October 2003, the Paddle Cruiser was delivered to Knysna by sea.The boat is 22.7 metres long, 7.5 metres wide in the beam and has a draft of 1.4 metres. Her propellers are powered by twin Caterpillar 3056 turbodiesel engines. Electrical energy for the paddles – the boat can make four knots on its paddles alone – is supplied by two 70kVA generators.“The Paddle Cruiser has become a must-do attraction in Knysna,” says Featherbed marketing manager Debbie Stanley, “and a popular fine dining experience.“A team of top chefs prepare Mediterranean style meals: a limited Tapas menu at lunch time and an extensive hot and cold Tapas buffet at dinner. The boat is becoming increasingly popular for functions, product launches and – a trend we didn’t expect – as an unusual conference venue.”In addition to the Paddle Cruiser, the Featherbed Company operates the John Benn and Three Legs cruise boats – as well as catamaran sailing – on the Knysna lagoon, and offers visits to the Featherbed Nature Reserve at the river mouth.SouthAfrica.info reporterlast_img read more

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Adidas Creators Contest Day 19

first_imgWHAT IS ADIDAS TELSTAR18 THIS WORLD CUP?Click here to answerWATCH CARNIBALL 2018, ONE QUESTION ON EACH MATCH DAYVIEWERS TO SEND IN THEIR ANSWERS AT indiatoday.in/sports/fifa-world-cup-2018SEND US YOUR ANSWERS ALONG WITH YOUR FULL NAME, ADDRESS & CONTACT NUMBERCONTEST FROM JUNE 14TH – 15TH JULY 2018, EACH DAY ONE WINNERWINNER WILL GET ADIDAS TELSTAR 18 FOOTBALLlast_img

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