Deep in the beat

first_imgHarvard’s Hutchins Center was caught in a wave of anticipation and excitement as Cambridge teens descended on its Hiphop Archive and Research Institute one recent morning.The energy was palpable as the exclamations, questions, and answers tumbled over each other. “This is so dope!” “You have an actual Biz Markie doll?” “Did Tupac actually wear those shoes?”The 13 teens, ranging in age from 14 to 18, were part of The Hip Hop Transformation (THHT) program. Just a year old, the program is offered free by the Cambridge Community Center, in partnership with the Cambridge Health Alliance, the Cambridge Police Department, and the Mayor’s Summer Youth Employment Program. Its goal is to teach teens the history of hip-hop, its role in society, and the skills it takes to write, record, and perform original music.“There is a lot you can learn from the culture of hip-hop. You can learn about the culture of change — and use that change for the greater good,” said Harvard senior Brandon Jarrett, a research assistant at the Hiphop Archive and Research Institute, who led the tour. “Where else would you have such an archive than at the worldwide epicenter of education — Harvard. Here we put an academic lens on hip-hop.Brandon Lewis (left) and Sherahd Mosley Jr. put their personal tags on the Hiphop Archive and Research Institute’s graffiti wall.Established in 2002, the Hiphop Archive at the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research has worked to support and establish research and scholarship devoted to all facets of hip-hop, including knowledge, art, culture, materials, and responsible leadership. Its innovative programs and projects encourage students to explore their own creativity.“We want this to be the center of the universe for anyone who is serious about hip-hop, and we want knowledge to be at the core,” said Marcyliena Morgan, executive director of the archive and a professor in Harvard’s Department of African and African American Studies.During their visit, the students explored the records, shoes, dolls, games, magazines, DVDs, autographs, and pictures that stud the center’s archives. They challenged each other to a hip-hop quiz, watched video clips about the positive possibilities hip-hop can bring to their lives, and put their own tags on the archive’s graffiti wall. (The program also gives the students the chance to create and record their own songs, which are then distributed across the city of Cambridge. At the end of its first summer, THHT put out a full album.)Fernandes Francois (left) and Genesis Flores work on the hip-hop quiz.This was the second year that 17-year-old Genesis Flores, who will be a senior at Cambridge Rindge and Latin School this fall, has participated in THHT, but it was his first time visiting the archive.“I can’t believe Nas was here. And 9th Wonder was here — right here!” Flores said, as his own music played over loudspeakers during the final legs of the tour. His rap was one of five tracks written, performed, and produced by the students. (The demo is available on the THHT website.)“This trip has been great for [the students],” said Darrin Korte, a professor of race relations at Emerson College and founder and director of THHT. “Bringing them here, and allowing them to see the exhibits and hear the speakers — it all reinforces that there are positive role models out there.“I can tell them over and over again — but it means so much more for them to see and hear from these folks that being invested in hip-hop can be a positive, learning experience.”last_img read more

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HBOR lowered interest rates in order to increase the use of EU funds

first_imgThe Management Board of HBOR has made a decision on a temporary reduction of the nominal interest rate under the program of lending to EU public sector projects to 2,5 percent, this reduction refers to loans that will be approved by the end of 2018.After the interest rates for lending to EU projects of the private sector and rural development, fisheries and wine envelope were reduced in 2017, a decision was made to temporarily reduce the interest rate for public sector projects.Thus, during this year, EU projects of rural development, fisheries and wine envelopes can be credited at an interest rate of 1,7 percent, EU private sector projects at an interest rate of 2,4 percent, and public sector projects at an interest rate of 2,5, 3 percent. Prior to these reductions, the minimum interest rates on all EU project lending programs were XNUMX percent. “By lowering interest rates while maintaining all other favorable conditions such as long repayment periods, the possibility of granting a grace period and using the grant as our own participation, we want to encourage entrepreneurs to invest and accelerate the dynamics of using available EU funds”Said Tamara Perko, President of the Management Board of HBOR.Source: HBORSo far, HBOR has supported more than 600 projects with an amount of more than HRK 3,4 billion through the program for lending to EU projects. Loans are approved directly, through commercial banks or according to the risk-sharing model for up to 15 years with the possibility of waiting up to 3 years, or up to 5 years for raising and / or restructuring long-term plantations and for the public sector. An additional advantage is that in certain cases the grant funds can be used to reduce the loan principal, and in the case of direct lending, HBOR can accept up to 70 percent of the grant amount as its own participation, HBOR points out.The interest rate reduction for EU projects of rural development, fisheries and wine envelope and public sector projects is in force for all loans approved until 31 December 12, and for those of the private sector until 2018 June 30. The final interest rate for each final The beneficiary depends on the credit rating as well as the collateral offered.Loans approved under these programs are intended to close the financial structure for project implementation, and can be used to co-finance eligible investments, as well as those investments that are an integral part of the project, but cannot be financed from EU funds.Source: HBORlast_img read more

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