Saint Mary’s hosts environmental film premiere

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Environmental Action Coalition (SMEAC) hosted a premiere of “Disruption” on Sunday. The environmental film, written and directed by Kelly Nyks and Jared P. Scott, was officially released Sunday online as an informative build-up to the upcoming People’s Climate March, SMEAC president Erin Cisneros said.Cisneros said the viewing brought together those on campus who are, or who hope to be, active in environmental change.“It’s kind of not actually what I expected,” Cisneros said. “It was a lot more colorful, and really informative for what’s going on. A lot of these films we watch, I feel they put the icing on top, open the people’s eyes to what’s going on, and the speakers in the film were really informative.”SMEAC secretary Gwen Murphy said she was surprised the film approached climate and environmental awareness from a social justice perspective.“So many times, people focus on the scientific,” Murphy said. “I think it’s a lot more powerful and will reach a lot more people this way.”Assistant professor of Political Science and Gender & Women’s Studies Sonalini Sapra said she organized the event after receiving and email from 350.org, international environmental group, asking if she would be willing to host a screening.While the film seeks to raise awareness of climate change and environmental justice, it also highlights the march planned for Sept. 21 and 22 in New York City, Sapra said.“[It is] the largest action in support of political action to address global warming. It is timed to coincide with the climate summit called by Ban Ki-Moon, for world leaders in advance of the next scheduled round of climate change negotiations in 2015,” Sapra said. “The purpose of this rally and other supporting events taking place around the world is to demonstrate the magnitude of support for effective action against climate change.”Sapra will be traveling with seven students to participate in the rally, Sapra said. Many Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s students whom Sapra has spoken with recognize that climate change and environmental degradation is a pressing issue, she said.“I’ve had students in my classes who understand that climate change is the ‘right to life’ issue of our time,” Sapra said. “I think students recognize that the impacts of climate change are disproportionately being felt by the poor and marginalized, and [they] want the U.S. to be at the forefront of modeling more sustainable behavior for the rest of the world.” The film suggested that bystanders to the environmental injustices that occur today are actually perpetrators, Cisneros said.“When you see people neglect something, then you become the issue,” Cisneros said. “I’m hoping people just see that we care, because we have nowhere else to go.”Sapra said Saint Mary’s should be at the forefront of sustainability initiatives as a Catholic college.“My hope is that students find the activism they encounter at this march to be inspiring and encourages them to raise the profile of environmental [and] sustainability issues amongst the student body and administration at Saint Mary’s,” Sapra said.Cisneros said the majority of the student body’s lack of activism was obvious in their inability to recycle properly.“People don’t know how to recycle,” Cisneros said. “We are very individualistic as a country. We need to be aware of what’s going on. People complain about how this summer was mild, and now it’s hot, and last winter was crazy. I’m hoping that [environmental change] becomes common knowledge now.”Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame should divest from fossil fuel companies in order to take part in environmental initiatives, Sapra said.“I think divestment from these dirty and dangerous companies, would send a strong message and keep SMC and ND more in accordance with their Catholic social justice mission,” Sapra said.SMEAC will discuss how to approach environmental change on campus during their first official meeting Thursday at 6:30 p.m. on the island of Lake Marion weather permitting, or in Rainbeaux Lounge in Les Mans Hall, Cisneros said.“We just want to be involved; we want to bring awareness to Saint Mary’s. That’s our goal this year,” Cisneros said. “We want to make a difference, and I think if we start here we can expand.”Tags: Climate March, Disruption, environmental action coalition, green, Premierelast_img read more

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Auctions heat up across the city on Super Saturday

first_imgInside 20 Morley St, ChelmerMr Robson said the location was also a big draw card.“It’s on the highside of Chelmer,” he said.“There’s a lot of love for homes in this area. The home at 33 Bowler St, Paddington.At 33 Bowler St, Paddington, the mood was tense and the crowd remained silent as two bidders fought it out for ownership of the architecturally designed home. Inside 33 Bowler St, PaddingtonThe three-level home sits on a generous 542sq m block less than two minutes walk from the popular restaurant and shopping precinct on Given Tce. On the ground level, there are two bedrooms, a media room, bathroom, wine cellar and two car garage.Upstairs is the main living quarters of the home, where the master suite with walk-in-wardrobe and ensuite opens out onto a balcony that has urban views and city glimpses. Inside 33 Bowler St, PaddingtonThere is also a large living room area and a north, north-east facing covered patio. At the rear, there is an open plan kitchen, dining and library area which flows out onto the covered deck, backyard and pool area. 20 Morley St, ChelmerWITH nearly one hundred homes expected to sell under the auction conditions this Super Saturday, Brisbane was buzzing with nerves and excitement from prospective buyers all across the city. Bidders raise the paddle at the auction of 33 Bowler St, Paddington. Pic Annette DewMr Degn said contemporary homes are hard to come by in Paddington. “There’s a market for new product, but the stock is few, and often sell before listing,” he said.‘People are waiting for these homes, and are ready to pounce.”More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus20 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market20 hours ago Inside 20 Morley St, ChelmerMr Robson said buyers were entranced by the home’s unique style.“It’s very different for Chelmer,” he said.“Most of the homes here are traditional Queenslanders, so to have something as unique as this I think really appealed to a lot of buyers. Inside 33 Bowler St, PaddingtonMarketing agent and auctioneer Andrew Degn of Place Real Estate, Paddington, said it was an unusually “tense and serious” auction. The home at 33 Bowler St, PaddingtonA loft bedroom occupies the third level of the home. Mr Degn said the layout appealed to buyers most. “They loved having the kitchen and dining area open straight out onto the deck, flat grass and pool area,” he said. A tense crowd at the auction of 33 Bowler St, Paddington. Pic Annette DewMore than five minutes of silence went by before an opening bid of $1,950,000 could be persuaded by Mr Degn. The home at 20 Morley St, ChelmerThe home sits on a 602 sq m block close to the river and has five bedrooms, two bathrooms and a two car garage, as well as high ceilings and an open plan layout which includes a living and dining area that opens out onto the outdoor alfresco deck by the pool. Auctioneer Andrew Degn at Paddington. Pic Annette DewNegotiations between the vendor, Mr Degn and the soon-to-be new owners raised the price to a final result of $2,220,000. The home at 20 Morley St, Chelmer.In Chelmer, this stunning Georgian style home sold under the hammer for a pretty penny.Marketing agent Brad Robson of Place Real Estate, Graceville said the property at 2 Morley St, Chelmer sold to a local couple looking to upsize to accommodate their growing family for $1,675,000. The home at 20 Morley St, ChelmerMr Robson said there was a lot of competition among buyers to secure quality homes in Chelmer. The home at 20 Morley St, Chelmer“If there were more homes to sell, we would sell them,” he said.“There hasn’t been a big swell of properties for sale in Chelmer yet this year. “It’s a sought after area where demand outstrips supply, so yeah buyers are competitive.”last_img read more

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Allardyce: Crazy job is addictive

first_img “Tim is 44 years old and not been a manager, and I thought he would have challenged himself a lot sooner in management terms. Obviously for him the right position hasn’t come up,” said Allardyce, who has taken charge at the likes of Blackpool, Notts County, Bolton, Blackburn and Newcastle since he moved into the dugout on hanging up his boots in 1992. “For ex-players like him and someone involved with Tottenham for quite a while, he has got a desire to be it, but the opportunity never arose where he was comfortable taking it. “If you are in a good job, why leave it to be a manager? “That has a bit of a crazy line in it: ‘you must be crazy leaving this job to go and be a manager because you could be one of the 50 or 60 out of 92 managers who end up with the sack’. “That is what happens every year now, so you have to be pretty good to last and man-management skills are one of the key elements.” Allardyce turned 59 earlier this year and admits football management can be “a love/hate job”. He added: “Sometimes you can sit in the chair and think ‘why the hell am I doing this?’, but if you are in it, then it is because it is what you do best. “What else are you going to do? West Ham manager Sam Allardyce accepts you probably have to be “crazy” to want to be a football manager, but there is no other job he would rather have. Press Association “You can do (punditry), that is okay for a while and those who get comfortable in that life are rarely going to step out of that and come into the crazy world of management – but once you have been in it and it gets in your blood, you pine for it. “If you lose it, you pine to get back in it and do all the things you do on a day to day basis. “I enjoy challenging myself. I wouldn’t be still here if I had not taken those challenges by the scruff of the neck and improved every football club I have ever been at.” The Irons take on a Tottenham side in the quarter-final of the Capital One Cup just two days after they sacked Andre Villas-Boas, with Tim Sherwood set to take temporary control. Allardyce feels former Spurs captain Sherwood, who was already on the coaching staff at White Hart Lane, is ready for his first steps into the often perilous, but addictive, world of football management. last_img read more

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