GFORCE selected for Corporate Sevens again

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The event last yearAfter the runaway success of the first Corporate Rugby Sevens Tournament to be held by Tigers Events at the Leicester Tigers ground, the organisers are putting the finishing touches to the plans for this year’s June tournament. Once again Gymphlex have been selected to provide GFORCE Rugby Kits for all participating teams.Matt Poole, Director at Tigers Events comments:-“The kit produced by GFORCE for the National Corporate Sevens would be worthy of gracing any major rugby tournament. We have had tremendous feedback from all the teams and are looking forward to working with GFORCE this year”. All Teams will once again be playing in professional quality co-ordinated sportswear from Gymphlex, including the GFORCE dye-sublimated Rugby Shirts and Shorts. All garments will be manufactured in the teams colours, with personalised branding for Tiger’s Events and each corporate team.center_img For further information on GFORCE please call 01507 523243 or look at www.gforcesportswear.co.uk.last_img read more

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RBS 6 Nations match review: Scotland 34 – 10 Italy

first_imgStatsItaly actually enjoyed 72% possession in the second half, but the 146 tackles Scotland made through the game meant the scoreline was strongly in their favour.Both teams were looking to play attacking rugby, with Italy making 406 metres and Scotland not far behind on 393m.Italy prop Andrea Lo Cicero won his 100th cap but did not have anything else to celebrate. Tim Visser strides through for Scotland’s first tryBy Katie FieldIn a NutshellFOUR TRIES from four different backs – in recent years Scotland have sometimes gone through a whole Six Nations without that kind of return. This time they achieved it in one match as they shrugged off any fears of a home defeat against Italy and put their visitors to the sword.Scotland were aggressive and effective at the breakdown, earning nine turnovers, and Greig Laidlaw used the possession well. They led 13-3 at half-time then ran in two more tries in the first seven minutes of the second half to leave Italy folornly trailing in their wake. Luciano Orquera, who had been so brilliant at No 10 for Italy a week ago, had a nightmarish time and didn’t last 50 minutes, while even the usually infallible Sergio Parisse was making mistakes.Scotland’s defence was superb and their attitude was epitomised by Sean Lamont’s try in the 69th minute. The centre leapt up from a tackle, booted the ball through the ruck then scooped it up and ran half the length of the field to score. His team were already 27-3 up, but they were still hungry. Lions WatchHotStuart Hogg: For the second week on the bounce the full-back showed he has the talent to make an impact in Australia this summer. He scored a fabulous interception try and was always a threat.Sean Maitland: The wing didn’t get on the scoresheet this week, but he got through a huge amount of good work, showcasing his range of skills in support of his team-mates.Richie Gray: The big man was a little quiet last week – by his standards – but he took his game up a level this time and almost forced a try with his enthusiastic chasing of a kick ahead, but Matt Scott’s touchdown was disallowed for a forward pass. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Sean Lamont’s attitude was typicalKey MomentScotland had edged into a 6-0 lead with two Laidlaw penalties in the first 24 minutes but they took a firm hold on the scoreboard when Tim Visser scored the game’s first try after 29 minutes. Good build-up work from Stuart Hogg and a lovely show and go from Ruaridh Jackson gave Visser the ball in a few yards of space and he wove his way through the last line of defence to touch down, with Laidlaw converting for a 13-0 lead. From there, Scotland had the confidence to kick on and win by 24 clear points. EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND – FEBRUARY 09: Scotland centre Matthew Scott (r) collects the pass to run in the second Scotland try during the RBS Six Nations match between Scotland and Italy at Murrayfield Stadium in Scotland, United Kingdom (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images) Star ManLaidlaw was named the RBS Man of the Match for his control of the game, but there were plenty of other Scottish candidates. Rob Harley was superb in the back row in his first start for Scotland, Richie Gray showed up well all around the park and Hogg had a stormer for the second week in a row. Sean Maitland (on floor) helped set up Scotland’s second try for Matt Scott (right).ColdNo Scots ended up with a black mark against their names this week. A good day at the office for them all. Try: Alessandro ZanniCon:  Kris Burton. Pen: Luciano Orquera Italy: Scorers:ScotlandTries: Tim Visser, Matt Scott, Stuart Hogg, Sean LamontCons:  Greig Laidlaw 4. Pens: Laidlaw 2last_img read more

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Pro’s Playbook: The free drop at goal

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Download the PDF here, and take it to training… DO YOU want to be able to win a match in the dying moments? Then read on, because in the October edition of Rugby World we asked former Lion Nigel Horton how to create a free drop-goal opportunity from an attacking scrum. Follow Horton’s top tips, and you could have a Jonny moment on your hands…last_img

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World Cup 2015: New Zealand 26-16 Argentina

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Timely intervention: Aaron Smith scored a try in the second half to signal a change in the game’s momentum Attendance: 89, 019For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. New Zealand came through in the second half of this hugely enjoyable contest as a spirited Argentina ran out of steam just as the Kiwi substitutes changed the momentum of the game. It was physical and a few of the All Blacks may have played themselves out of a starting spot, but New Zealand have got their toughest World Cup pool game out of the way.WHAT’S HOTWembley crowd – A new record was set for attendance, with 89, 019 people crammed into Wembley, but they were good value as well. At times the noise was deafening and there was a truly impressive atmosphere throughout the game. No doubt a passionate performance from Argentina helped.Lack of panic – The All Blacks rarely fall apart, so when some players underperformed – Ma’a Nonu may not look back on this game with too much fondness, while Nehe Milner-Skudder made plenty of unforced errors – Steve Hansen calmly deployed his bench early. Sonny Bill Williams changed the game, frightened defenders into committing while Wyatt Crockett and Charlie Faumuina came in specifically to challenge a dominant Pumas scrum.Slogging away: Agustin Creevy carries into the heart of the All BlacksCaptain’s knock – Agustin Creevy put in a true leader’s display, carrying hard, hitting strong lines, scrummaging with relish and even throwing a few choice passes. When faced with the All Blacks bearing down on him he gritted his teeth an ran right at them. And what’s more, veteran flanker Juan Martin Fernandez Lobbe was normally right behind him. It wasn’t enough in the end, but for an hour he was superb.Black lineouts – Their scrum may not have been firing on all cylinders, but their lineout was a thing of beauty and gave their half-backs perfect ball to work with. They generated good momentum from the set-piece from the sidelines, at one point driving a maul deep into the Pumas territory.WHAT’S NOTAll Blacks see yellow – Argentina’s Pablo Matera saw yellow first, getting sin binned after just ten minutes, but it was New Zealand’s lack of discipline that gave the Pumas every chance in the first half. Referee Wayne Barnes was ready to dish out the cards for infractions as Richie McCaw found out after an attempted trip – and he totally deserved his time off the park. Conrad Smith also got ten minutes on the naughty step after coming in from the side to halt Argentina, right in front of Barnes.Not so mellow yellow: Richie McCaw got New Zealand’s first yellow cardArgentina’s conditioning – They went toe to toe with New Zealand for 65 minutes, but after that holes began appearing in their heroic defences. Aaron Smith was able to exploit disarray in a scrambling defensive line to score his try and gaps were opening up all over for the last quarter.Booing McCaw – the player himself said he had no problem facing it when he was in the sin bin, but it’s pretty grim booing him during his post-match, pitched interview.STATISTICS3 – McCaw’s yellow card was only the third he’s ever received in Testscenter_img 33 – The number of tackles missed by Argentina5 – The number of offloads made by Sonny Bill WilliamsSome start: Argentina started brilliantly, but fadedNew Zealand: B Smith; N Milner-Skudder (B Barrett 49), C Smith, M Nonu (SB Williams 45), J Savea; D Carter, A Smith (TJ Perenara 68); T Woodcock (W Crockett 45), D Coles (K Mealamu 68), O Franks (C Faumuina 49), B Retallick (V Vito 70), S Whitelock, J Kaino (S Cane 64), R McCaw, K Read.Tries (2): A Smith, Cane Cons: Carter 2 Pens: Carter 4Yellow cards: McCaw (29min), C Smith (37min)Argentina: J Tuculet (L Amorosino 69); S Cordero, M Bosch, JM Hernandez, J Imhoff; N Sanchez (De la Fuente 69), T Cubelli (M Landejo 61); M Ayerza, A Creevy (L Noguera Paz 69), N Tetaz Chaparro (R Herrera 54), G Petti (M Galarza 22), T Lavanini, P Matera (JM Leguizamon 58), JM Fernandez Lobbe, L Senatore (J Montoya 64).Tries (1): Petti Cons: Sanchez Pens: Sanchez 3Yellow card: P Matera (10min)Referee: Wayne Barnes (England)Man of the match: Brodie Retallick TAGS: Highlight last_img read more

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Billy Vunipola is out of the tournament with Nick Easter drafted in

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Double-trouble: Michael Hooper and David Pocock will cause any teams trouble at the breakdownHowever with Morgan only just back from an injury of his own, he will need to prove that he is up to speed, with Easter in a similar boat having not played since being cut from the squad at the end of August and last been seen giving pitchside analysis during the World Cup.A number of former players have already suggested that Easter should come straight into the starting lineup, and his offloading ability would certainly come in very handy. In that regard, he is even more proficient than Vunipola, having finished top of the offloading charts in the Premiership last season.However a start for Easter would mean yet another change of tact for Lancaster, who has always favoured a big ball-carrier at number eight. The last time one of Vunipola or Morgan didn’t start there for England was back in 2013 and a certain unmentionable game in Cardiff with Tom Wood filling in. Step up: Ben Morgan is widely expected to fill the No 8 berthWith that in mind, Morgan seems more likely to start and when fit, he has been very useful for England. Still, Vunipola will be a loss, after one of his best performances of the year against Wales prior to injury.The Saracens back rower topped the charts for metres made against the Welsh, and was visibly more effective than James Haskell who replaced him. Saturday will tell us whether England can find a solution to replace him while they are still in with a shout of escaping the pool stages. Big miss: The impressive Billy Vunipola is out of the World Cup center_img England’s buccaneering No 8 Billy Vunipola has been forced out of the World Cup with a knee injury to be replaced by evergreen Nick Easter Billy Vunipola has become the latest high-profile player to withdraw from the World Cup through injury, following the likes of Jean de Villiers, Yoann Huget, Grant Gilchrist and Scott Williams, with the age-defying 37-year-old Nick Easter called up in his place.Vunipola had to leave the field with 18 minutes remaining of Saturday’s dramatic defeat to Wales, straining knee ligaments that are expected to keep him out of action for six weeks.As a result, his first World Cup is already over, and it remains to be seen whether his bonus-point try in the final minutes against Fiji on the opening night will prove to be relevant in the final shakeup in Pool A.Easter option: Nick Easter will bring leadership and skill to the England backrowWith leadership lacking on Saturday, Stuart Lancaster has gone with the pragmatic choice in Easter, who will be desperate to improve on his last World Cup contribution, which ended with the infamous ‘that’s £35k down the toilet’ quote.The question now though, is what does Lancaster do on Saturday in England’s make-or-break clash with Australia at Twickenham? One positive is the fitness of Ben Morgan, who missed the Wales loss through injury, and could be parachuted straight back into the team.From a tactical standpoint, Morgan is England’s closest imitation of Vunipola, with his own powerful carrying game, while also being one of the better options on the deck. That will be vital against the Australians, with England already looking overmatched at the breakdown against the combination of David Pocock and Michael Hooper.last_img read more

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Hotshot: Bath and England U20 back Tom de Glanville

first_imgThis article originally appeared in the August 2019 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Bath and England U20 back Tom de GlanvilleDate of birth 10 December 1999 Born Bath Club Bath Country England Position CentreWhat sports did you play growing up? Hockey, cricket, football, rugby… I started rugby at six or seven with Bath minis, my local club, and we played on an outfield that backed onto the Rec. I didn’t enjoy it at the start – I was shy and didn’t know anyone – so I stopped playing for a year or so, then my mum got me to go back and make friends.What do you like about rugby? Just the whole culture, being part of a group, the feeling you get winning with your mates.Who was your childhood hero? Jonny Wilkinson was for every kid my age. At Bath, there are players who have been there since I was growing up, so those are boys I look up to, like Tom Dunn.What positions have you played? I had a season at scrum-half, but the majority of my career has been at fly-half, and I’ve played centre and full-back. I’ve actually played everywhere in the back-line and I’m comfortable moving around, but I think I’ll settle at ten or 12. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS This youngster recently signed his first senior contract with Bathcenter_img What are your strengths? Probably having an influence on the team and being in the playmaking role. I enjoy chucking the ball and moving it out wide.Who’s been the biggest influence on you? There’s not one single person, just my family – all with different aspects. My brothers used to go into the garden chucking a ball around, the three of us together. Mum would drive me to games in the middle of nowhere when I was younger. Dad (ex-England captain Phil de Glanville) used to chat to me about the game and give me a helping hand.My older brother, Jake, is at Durham University – he has a passion for music – and my little brother, Ollie, is in the junior academy at Bath.What do you do away from rugby? I’m studying biology at Leeds University. I’m on loan at Otley there. Playing in National Two has been great, allowing me to ease into men’s rugby.RW VERDICT: De Glanville is preparing well for rugby by developing at Otley and preparing well for life after rugby with a degree. After competing for England U20 at the World Cup, he was given a senior contract by Bath and his focus will now turn to pre-season and pushing for game time. On the move: Tom de Glanville makes a break for England U20 (Getty Images) last_img read more

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LOS ANGELES: Nun cultivates ‘Good Seeds’ at juvenile jail

first_imgLOS ANGELES: Nun cultivates ‘Good Seeds’ at juvenile jail The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Fr John Crean says: Joan Barnwell says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Artwork by “Serena” of the “Good Seeds” program at Los Padrinos Juvenile Hall in Downey, California, expresses her inner turmoil. Clockwise from top left: Sun; God; Rebelision; Anger.[The Episcopal News, Diocese of Los Angeles] Feeling beloved is a tough sell for “Serena,” 15, and the other students in the “Good Seed” classes taught by Episcopal nun Sr. Greta Ronningen at a California juvenile jail.Their schoolwork says so.Like Serena, whose series of colored pencil self-portraits depict “parts” of herself and also illuminate her inner battles:A huge sun;A small white spot showing “God” inside a well of darkness, all of which is nearly swallowed up by bright red anger.Another, of a demon she called “Rebelision,” is a derivative of rebellion and confusion, with question marks for eyes, jagged teeth in a mouth opened in rage, scary enough to evoke tears.Enabling Serena and the other girls to connect with themselves, with one another and with God through art therapy, meditation, journaling, prayer and counseling are aims of Ronningen’s program, also called the “Peace Project.”On May 14, at the urging of her classmates, Serena read from a poem she wrote and titled “Inner Demon”:There’s this inner demon full of flaws and complications,she’s inside of me, here to destroy … she wants to destroy meshe wants me to be sadshe wants me to be depressedand not feel whole but less than halfShe hates me she hates mebut yet she’s a part of meShe hates me She betrayed meShe wants me to be angry …Dressed in prison issue black pants and gray T-shirts, Serena and five other girls who live in the special housing unit at Los Padrinos Juvenile Hall in Downey file into the classroom Ronnignen has carefully prepared. (The young women’s names have been changed to protect their identities).Their laughter and good-natured banter belies deep hurts, troubled pasts, and overwhelming histories of victimization, abuse, violence. A total of 400 minors are in the facility awaiting trial on a variety of charges; 75 are girls.Ronningen prepares the room for class by popping meditative music into a CD player, distributing colored pencils and paper, rearranging chairs, spraying lavender-scented air freshener for “aromatherapy” and lighting a candle.This particular day, a Monday, Ronningen is teaching on the “sun side” of the unit, a pink building that houses older girls like Serena, ages 15 to 18, charged with serious felonies. The other, or “moon side,” houses younger girls facing less serious charges and is where she teaches on Wednesday afternoons.Though minors, these girls are often labeled by society as monsters, but each was “wounded, hurt and abused” prior to arriving at the facility, Ronningen said. She is a former yoga instructor and business owner turned “subversive” Episcopal nun, who sees traces of herself in these girls, and hopes they can benefit from her own evolution.Through a three-year grant from the Episcopal Church Foundation for transformational ministries, she is able to offer informational classes on stress, anger, forgiveness, power and control, abusive relationships and healing as well as teaching breathing, meditation and other coping skills. She also offers opportunities for Christian formation and faith-building, for deepening relationships with God.“I usually start the class on healing by telling them that I was raped when I was 17 by my stepfather’s best friend,” Ronningen said. “That opens the door for a deeper level of sharing. One class, when I spoke about that, every girl sitting at the table — there were four of them — all four shared their experience of rape. Many tears were shed.”But she adds: “In this environment, it’s tricky to be revealing. Some of these girls are in gangs; some live in neighborhoods that are in conflict with one another. I’m very careful about sharing, but when this came up, it was quite amazing. It helps them build compassion for each other, for the suffering they’ve gone through, and it was very powerful.”The path to healing involves facing past demons and learning new ways of coping, Ronningen added. Her own experiences led her to “risky behavior and drugs and abuse and it prepared a fertile ground from which I do this ministry.”She has served for nearly four years as a chaplain for Prism, the restorative justice ministry of the diocese, visiting inmates at the Twin Towers facility in downtown Los Angeles and other locations. She has also completed three units of clinical pastoral education and is working toward a master’s degree in spiritual formation at the Claremont School of Theology.She is a founding member of the Community of Divine Love, an Episcopal religious order in the Benedictine tradition, in San Gabriel. She had founded the two largest yoga businesses in the United States and continues to teach yoga, including breathing and meditation classes, to cancer patients at City of Hope Hospital in Duarte.She also offers individual counseling.This particular Monday, 15-year-old Christina wanted to stay after class to talk. “There’s a lot of anger in me I wish would be out,” she tells Ronningen, worried that she will spend yet another birthday in jail. She has essentially been on her own since she was nine years old and was arrested at 14 and charged with murder, she says.She isn’t sure how she got to Los Padrinos. “I never did drugs, didn’t drink, I always went to school, I didn’t get into trouble, how am I here?” she says. “I feel like this is a bad dream. I don’t want to be here. I want to be free and with my family, not waking up with strangers, eating at a precise time, lights off at a certain time, with time limits on the phone, my mail is opened, wearing these clothes.“I keep thinking about all the other stuff I could be doing.”Ronningen interjects: “Take a deep breath and get some perspective,” she says. “You are here and you can use this time …“… to be productive,” Christina finishes the sentence. “I have faith,” she concludes. “I hope God has my back. He knows what’s in my heart, who I am, that I don’t want to do bad, that I’m just waiting and ready to go home. I have a lot of hopes that the Peace Project is helping me see what’s truly there.”“I love this,” Ronningen said of her ministry at Los Padrinos. “There’s such a need. There’s such a huge hunger. I just want more people to actually join us. People who have volunteered with Prism just love it.“People who are incarcerated are so hungry,” she said. “They’re so humbled by this brokenness in their lives, by this crisis that there’s an opportunity to bring this nutrient-dense word of God into their lives.”Recently, she was asked to be the godmother for one of her students.Destiny, 15, grew up in Compton. Fresh-faced, soft-voiced, shy, she rakes her hand through her shoulder-length hair as she describes first connecting with Ronningen seven months ago.That was after she graduated from “Level 3 … when they say you want to kill yourself or somebody else.”Ronningen’s revelations about her own experience of rape struck a chord with Destiny, also a victim of sexual abuse. She soaked up all the Good Seed classes she could, repeating the lessons aloud.“What got me was how we can breathe, try different types of breathing, and learning about anger issues and calming ourselves down, to think before we act,” she said.She has learned a great deal, she said, especially about forgiveness and redemption. She hopes to someday work in a hospital, conducting sonograms for expectant mothers. “It represents a new life, new children from God. A healthy life.”“When the holy water was poured on my forehead, I wanted to cry, but I didn’t,” she said of her baptism. “It felt like a new beginning, like I was God’s child.”“I know my life will never be perfect,” she added, “but I will try to maintain the ten commandments from this day forward.”She wants people to know, she said, that whatever the circumstance or situation “whether you’re being abused or bullied, whatever things people do to put you down or see you sad, don’t believe what they’re saying. Love your life.”Destiny, Ronningen said, “is so beautiful, she has hope, she’s such a bright light, she has such a tender heart, having suffered so much. We’ve talked about the idea that she would someday be of great inspiration and hope to others who also suffer.“I think that these girls need to have good seeds planted in their hearts and minds: coping skills, wisdom, love of God,” Ronningen added. “I think that these seeds are planted and will come to fruition in their lives.” June 19, 2012 at 8:37 am The use of art and music therapy with imprisoned women regardless of age facilitates in much inner healing toward wholeness. Good work. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 June 19, 2012 at 12:28 pm God bless you, Sr. Greta, and all your girls. I just wish more of the world could hear about how you’re living your mission and bringing new life, healing and hope to these damaged young women. I understand the need to keep perspective and boundries in work like yours, but sometimes we need to let our stories be told so that they can see living proof that the damage we, too, have sustained can be healed, with God’s help. You bring hope to me, too, that the world CAN be a better place. Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments are closed. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET martha knight says: center_img Tags Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Jobs & Calls In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC June 26, 2012 at 6:46 pm Great article, Greta. Wonderful to be connected with you through the Community of Divine Love. Keep up the good work! Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Youth & Young Adults Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Comments (3) Rector Collierville, TN By Pat McCaughanPosted Jun 18, 2012 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK last_img read more

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Presiding Bishop releases letter about the Diocese of Haiti

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA Posted Dec 1, 2016 Rector Collierville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET December 3, 2016 at 2:44 pm Although I have had some acquaintance with the Diocese of Haiti in the past and know the three recipients of the Presiding Bishop’s letter, I have no knowledge of specific issues that have prompted the current conflict. The PB’s stress on reconciliation as the goal to pray and work for is excellent and clearly just the right note to strike at this time. It would be easy for a letter of this type to slip into the bureaucratese of canons and procedures – as many such letters have in the past history of the Episcopal Church. Instead, Michael Curry addresses the situation from the standpoint of the gospel and God’s mission of reconciliation through Christ Jesus. Thanks be to God for his faithfulness and vision, and thanks be to God that both bishops involved have said that they likewise wish to work toward reconciliation. Leon Spencer says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC December 1, 2016 at 8:03 pm It is sad to learn about divisions within the episcopate of Haiti. I remember Bp Duracin many years ago as a committed leader and pastor. I do not know Bp Beauvoir, but certainly when he was elected suffragan bishop there must have been harmony on all sides. Presiding Bishop Curry does not mention what the dispute is all about, but perhaps one could guess, given other ruptures within the Episcopal Church which for the most part seem to be healing themselves. Let us pray for reconciliation in Haiti too, where all available energies are still need for rebuilding after that devastating earthquake that took so many lives. And just an editorial comment: the acronym DFMS – the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society (of the Episcopal Church USA), if I remember rightly – may not be known to many readers nowadays in the world of TEC. It might be worthwhile explaining whatever subtle distinction there is today, if any. Tags December 1, 2016 at 8:55 pm I do not know the nature of this conflict, so make no comment re it. But I have been privileged to work with Bishop Oge Beauvoir over many years, principally through ANITEPAM, the African Anglican theological education network, and especially as a consultant re ministerial formation after the genocide in Rwanda. I have deep affection for him and for his ministry. I do hope this painful time may lead to true reconciliation. Norly GERMAIN says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 December 5, 2016 at 6:22 pm May They All Be ONE,as The Father, Son, and Holy Ghost are One..This will pass, and guess what, THE HOLY TRINITY MARCHES ON.. Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Comments are closed. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] The Office of the Presiding Bishop announced Dec. 1 that it was releasing a letter from Presiding Bishop Michael Curry to the Rt. Rev. Zache Duracin, the Rt. Rev. Oge Beauviour and the Rev. Dr. Kesner Ajax, president of the Standing Committee of the Diocese of Haiti. The letter follows.Dear Bishop Duracin, Bishop Beauvoir, Dr. Ajax:I greet you in Jesus Christ with the apostolic words of St. Paul:“So if anyone is in Christ, there is a new creation: everything old has passed away; see,everything has become new! All this is from God, who reconciled us to himself throughChrist, and has given us the ministry of reconciliation.” (2 Corinthians 5:17-18)As baptized disciples of the Lord Jesus Christ in the Episcopal Church we have beensummoned into being by him, to proclaim and to share his Gospel, to make disciples ofall nations, and to be instruments of God’s reconciliation and healing for the hurts of the world.I write now in a context in which there is hurt and brokenness in the church, the body ofChrist. We are all a part of Christ’s body. The hurt and brokenness affects us all, and Iinclude myself, as your Presiding Bishop, in that company. As St. Paul said in the epistleto the Romans, “all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.” But he goes on to sayin Romans that where sin and brokenness increase, the grace of God in the Jesus Christabounds all the more. God’s grace is greater and God’s Spirit is stronger than our deepesthurts and most profound wounds. So now let us fall on our knees before the Lord and callon that Grace, that Spirit, that power to help, to heal, to restore and renew, to save and toset us free!The task before us now is to work together in the Holy Spirit to attain the greatest degreeof healing and reconciliation that is possible in the Diocese of Haiti and our wider Episcopal Church. And this we do not for our sake alone, but for the sake of the people ofHaiti, the ministry of the Diocese of Haiti, the wider Episcopal Church, and the very integrity of our witness to the Gospel of Jesus Christ itself.All that I say in what follows is with that goal in mind — to work toward the greatest degree of healing and reconciliation possible. There may be aspects in what I say belowthat some will disagree with. I accept that. But acknowledging that, it is important toremember that the goal is greater than all else. So, I am asking us all to commit ourselvesto the goal of working toward the highest and greatest degree of healing andreconciliation possible! For God has entrusted us with the ministry of reconciliation, notonly in the world, but in the church.In numerous statements and conversations since I became Presiding Bishop, and morerecently when I was meeting in Haiti with Bishop Duracin and the Standing Committeeof your diocese in late August, I have stressed what may be obvious to some but bearsrepeating again and again: that the troubles that have faced and continue to face theDiocese of Haiti are of grave concern, not only to me and other bishops, but to countlessothers throughout the Church who have had and continue to have a strong interest inhelping the Diocese do its crucial ministry. And so, it is troubling that on top of theburdens placed upon the Diocese from natural and economic forces, serious divisionshave arisen in the Diocese – divisions between the two bishops and divisions among theclergy and, undoubtedly, the laity.Sadly, as we discussed in Haiti, some of those divisions have led to the pendingdisciplinary proceeding under Title IV of the canons against the Bishop Diocesan, largelystimulated by allegations made by the Bishop Suffragan. Since our meeting, it hasbecome even clearer that this proceeding will continue to move toward an unflatteringpublic trial within the next few months — with painful allegations by both bishops againsteach other and testimony by clergy of the Diocese as witnesses on both sides — unless away can be found to resolve it amicably. Moreover, since our meeting, divisions amongthe lay and clerical leadership of the Diocese embodied in both the Bishop Diocesan andthe Standing Committee, on the one hand, and the Bishop Suffragan, on the other, haveled to the recent filing by the Standing Committee of the petition under Title III of theChurch’s canons requesting that I begin the canonical process by which the pastoralrelation between the Diocese and the Bishop Suffragan may now be involuntarilydissolved.I believe that my responsibilities as Presiding Bishop, both pastoral and canonical, directme to exert every reasonable effort to find ways to make substantial progress in healingthese divisions before further damage is done to the Diocese and the larger Church. Asthe most pressing and immediate challenge, I believe that all concerned must worktogether toward a prompt, amicable and pastorally acceptable resolution of both theforegoing canonical proceedings.This effort now seems to me to be all the more crucial in the light of the fact that theBishop Diocesan will be retiring within the next few years and, indeed, since ourmeeting, has called for the election of a Bishop Coadjutor. How important it is that thatelection be conducted by a diocese that is healthy and generous of spirit cannot beoverstated.At the Haiti meeting discussed above, I promised to help develop and implement twoprocesses in the furtherance of reconciliation and restoration of the health of the Diocese.The first was to appoint representatives of DFMS to work with representatives of theDiocese in creating a new “memorandum of understanding” relating to the joint efforts ofthe Diocese and the DFMS in future development projects, with a focus on joint decision making and sound and responsible financial practices. I am pleased that, with good-faith efforts on the part of representatives of both the Diocese and the DFMS, agreement onsuch a memorandum was quickly reached and is now being implemented. That is asignificant accomplishment that creates the basis for equal partnership in mission, for thesake of the Gospel and the people of Haiti. Thank you to all who worked to achieve this.The second was to develop a process for new conversations that would focus directly andspecifically on the divisions among the bishops and the Standing Committee anddivisions among the clergy. After giving this matter considerable thought and prayer, Ihave determined to appoint a three-person panel to assist me in a series of in-depthconversations with the bishops and clerical and lay leaders of the Diocese in the weeksand months ahead. All three persons whom I have selected, and who have agreed toserve, have had substantial personal experience with the Diocese and are persons inwhom I place considerable trust. They are the Rt. Rev. Stephen T. Lane, the Bishop ofMaine, whose diocese, as you know, has for some years had a partner relationship withHaiti; The Rev. P. Roger Bowen, a former Headmaster of Episcopal schools who, as youalso know, has fostered partner relationships of countless schools in Haiti with Churchschools and parishes in our other dioceses; and Paul B. Nix, Jr., Esquire, In-houseCounsel for the DFMS in New York, who has worked persistently on specificdevelopment projects in Haiti, including the design and legal issues relating to theprojected construction of a new Cathedral, as well as on the memorandum ofunderstanding referred to above.As I told Bishops Duracin and Beauvoir by telephone last week, I have asked this panelto begin its efforts with discussions with each of the bishops separately in the ChurchHeadquarters in New York by the end of this month. I shall ask the panel to arrange ameeting with members of the Standing Committee promptly thereafter. After themembers of the panel have then met with me to reflect upon the issues raised by thesediscussions, I shall design the next phase of this process.I am appreciative of and encouraged by the fact that in my recent conversations withboth of my brother bishops each assured me that he wished to work towardreconciliation. I thank them and thank God for that willingness.Pursuant to my canonical responsibilities referred to above and my defined role as ChiefPastor, I am asking all involved to give this process all strength of effort and good will.Ultimately, however, I ask this of us all, in obedience to our Lord who has, as St. Paulsaid, entrusted us with God’s ministry of reconciliation.Allow me to offer the prayer of St. Francis.Lord, make us instruments of your peace. Where there is hatred, let us sow love; wherethere is injury, pardon; where there is discord, union; where there is doubt, faith; wherethere is despair, hope; where there is darkness, light; where there is sadness, joy. Grantthat we may not so much seek to be consoled as to console; to be understood as tounderstand; to be loved as to love. For it is in giving that we receive; it is in pardoningthat we are pardoned; and it is in dying that we are born to eternal life. Amen.Your brother in Christ,The Most Reverend Michael B. CurryPresiding Bishop and Primate of the Episcopal Church Anthony Price says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Presiding Bishop releases letter about the Diocese of Haiti Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Comments (5) Submit a Press Release Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Rector Bath, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group center_img Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Haiti, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Titus Presler says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI December 3, 2016 at 8:20 am That’s unfortunate the hereditary power-hunger that exist in the political environment in Haiti has spread into the church of God. I was an acolyte since I was 8 years old and after high school I did address to the diocese of Haiti my willingness to enter the seminar. Finally I gave up when I realize in Haiti no one has expressed the desire to become a priest because they feel they are calling or have the vocation for that, but do so for the only and only one reason to secure a job and be the head of some partnerships. It is a shame they let that political division we have experienced in the country since 1803 spread through our church as well. Best way to help the diocese of Haiti is to stop funding those cons. May the supports go directly to the parishes instead of going through the diocese. We should request real reform in the diocese of Haiti. I have great respect for Bill Esquire for all the work he has completed in Haiti, but having a committee of only 3 people to work on that issue without including a Haitian who can understand the context and the lies of those people won’t help to resolve the problem. Should this problem be solved asap to save our diocese. Dictatorship somewhere is a threat for democracy everywhere.Norly Germain, a concerned episcopalian Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Frank E. Tate, III says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

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El peregrinaje de reconciliación a Ghana es un ‘regreso a…

first_img Por Lynette WilsonPosted Feb 20, 2017 Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Tags Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC De izquierda a derecha, la peregrina Constance Perry, ex miembro de junta de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo y la obispa sufragánea de Massachusetts, Gayle Harris, pasan frente a la capilla presbiteriana que se encuentra en el patio del castillo de Elmina. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.[Episcopal News Service – Accra, Ghana] La mayoría de los episcopales y los estadounidenses conocen la historia de la esclavitud en Estados Unidos, y de cómo los soldados de la Unión y los confederados libraron una sangrienta guerra civil por abolirla o conservarla. Pero menos sabido es la horrorosa historia que precedía al viaje de los esclavos al Nuevo Mundo: un viaje que los llevaba de África a las plantaciones y ciudades de América y el Caribe.A fines de enero, el obispo primado Michael Curry llevó a Ghana, en un peregrinaje de reconciliación, a un grupo de obispos y de amigos y contribuyentes de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo. Los peregrinos visitaron ciudades y lugares imprescindibles para entender la trata trasatlántica de esclavos así como los asociados y programas de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo para mejorar las vidas de los ghaneses.Fue una peregrinación que el Obispo Primado describió como semejante a un regreso a casa.“Yo realmente lo imaginaba como una especie de ‘retorno’ para mí, como afroamericano, como alguien nacido y criado en Estados Unidos. Siempre que vuelvo a África, ya sea oriental, central u occidental, con frecuencia tengo la extraña sensación de llegar a una tierra que me conoció antes”, dijo, mientras estaba de pie en el patio del castillo de Elmina, construido por los portugueses en 1482.“Pero esta vez, sabiendo que veníamos a un lugar de esclavitud [inicial], de embarque, donde los esclavos comenzaban su viaje mediante la travesía [del Atlántico]… sabiendo eso era como regresar a las raíces de quien soy. Y cuando uno regresa a sus raíces, uno está realmente volviendo a casa”.De izquierda a derecha, el obispo de la Diócesis Anglicana de Tamale, Jacob Ayeebo, el obispo primado Michael Curry y el obispo jubilado de Tamale Emmanuel Arongo comparten la risa durante un oficio en la iglesia anglicana de Santiago Apóstol en Binaba, una iglesia construida por una subvención de la Ofrenda Unida de Gracias. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.Desde Accra, la capital de Ghana, los peregrinos volaron al norte, a Tamale, y abordaron un autobús que los llevó aún más al norte a la región del Alto Este, donde pasaron una mañana andando por las sendas del campamento de esclavos de Pikoro, las mismas sendas recorridas por unas 500.000 personas esclavizadas entre 1704 y 1805. Los esclavos recién capturados, provenientes de Mali y de Burkina Faso, eran traídos al campamento donde los encadenaban a los árboles, donde recibían una comida al día en cuencos labrados en la roca y donde comenzaba el proceso de despojarlos de su humanidad. Los esclavos eran enviados a pie desde Pikoro a alguno de los 50 castillos de la costa occidental de África, 39 de ellos en Ghana, más de 1.000 kilómetros al sur, donde los mantenías encerrados en mazmorras, hacinados de pie y durmiendo sobre sus propios excrementos, antes de que sus captores los cargaran en los barcos destinados para el Nuevo Mundo. Los peregrinos recorrieron ese trayecto también, volando de regreso a Accra y abordando un autobús que los llevara a la costa.“De muchas maneras esta peregrinación ha hecho nacer la reconciliación en aquellos de nosotros que participamos, según nos hemos reconciliado unos con otros y hemos sido integrados en la amada comunidad”, dijo la Rda. Stephanie Spellers, canóniga del Obispo Primado para la evangelización, la reconciliación y la creación. “La reconciliación con nuestra historia y con la trata de esclavos y la manera en que tantos estaban implicados en ella y sufrieron por ella, y reconciliación por lo que hemos visto gracias a la labor de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo, que la historia no tiene que definir la manera en que la Iglesia se muestra hoy en Ghana y en todo el mundo”.Africanos capturados provenientes de Mali y de Burkina Faso eran mantenidos en el campamento de esclavos de Pikoro en la región del Alto Este hasta que los llevaban forzadamente hasta las mazmorras de alguno de los muchos castillos de la Costa de Oro. Aquí, Aaron Azumah, un guía del campamento, muestra de la manera en que eran atados y obligados a sentarse en la roca del castigo. Si no mostraban ningún arrepentimiento por la transgresión cometida, los dejaban morir bajo el ardiente sol. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.La Iglesia de Inglaterra y la Iglesia Episcopal fueron cómplices de la trata de esclavos, siendo muchos los episcopales que poseían esclavos y que lucraron con la trata de esclavos y su comercio ancilar en materias primas —ron, azúcar, molasas, tabaco y algodón. La “travesía” funcionaba como un triángulo: los barcos zarpaban de Europa con mercancías manufacturadas para África donde intercambiaban esas mercancías por esclavos que eran capturados en otros países africanos. Esos esclavos eran enviados al Caribe, donde algunos trabajaban en plantaciones; otros eran llevados a Norte y Sudamérica junto con el azúcar y las molasas, donde volvían a venderlos. Los barcos cargaban entonces productos agrícolas tales como café, ron y tabaco para venderlos y procesarlos en Europa, y luego volvían a zarpar para África donde los tratantes de esclavos cambiaban la mercancía por más esclavos  y así continuaba el viaje triangular.Los portugueses, los holandeses y los británicos, todos ellos en una u otra época, ocuparon los castillos y controlaron la trata trasatlántica de esclavos. Se calcula que de 12 a 25 millones de africanos pasaron por los puertos de Ghana para ser vendidos en Estados Unidos, América Latina y el Caribe.Gran Bretaña abolió la trata de esclavos en 1807 y en 1834 declaró ilegal la posesión de esclavos. El presidente de EE.UU. Thomas Jefferson firmó una ley en 1808 que prohibía la importación de esclavos, pero la esclavitud continuó hasta la aprobación de la 13ª. Enmienda [de la Constitución] en 1865.Aunque las iglesias anglicana y episcopal participaros posteriormente en el movimiento abolicionista, y a veces lo dirigieron, las iglesias y los individuos anglicanos y episcopales se beneficiaron de la trata de esclavos. La 75ª. Convención General en 2006 buscó abordar el papel de la Iglesia en la esclavitud. En 2008, la Iglesia Episcopal pidió perdón oficialmente por su participación en la esclavitud y en la trata trasatlántica de esclavos.El obispo primado Michael Curry y la obispa sufragánea de Massachusetts Gayle Harris comparten un momento en el castillo de Elmina, uno de los 50 castillos de la costa occidental de África que sirvieron como puntos de embarque para los esclavos que eran despachados al continente americano y al Caribe. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.El legado de la esclavitud “no es sólo la raza”, dijo Curry, sino la contradicción de que la república norteamericana se fundó en principios democráticos y en la idea de que todos somos creados iguales.“Ser portadores del lenguaje de la igualdad de la humanidad, y sin embargo no vivirlo plenamente, eso era una contradicción viviente… [Los Estados Unidos de] América ha luchado por resolverla. Tuvo lugar una guerra civil por no haberse resuelto”, dijo. “Y todos los conflictos posteriores, la Reconstrucción, el surgimiento de la segregación, del movimiento de los derechos civiles… muchísimas de las tensiones y divisiones que uno ve ahora en la sociedad norteamericana, algunos de sus orígenes se remontan al hecho de que en nuestro ADN [de la nación] original  el problema de la libertad y la esclavitud no estaba resuelto, la igualdad humana no estaba plenamente resuelta. Aunque ellos [los próceres fundadores] estaban orientados en la dirección correcta, no avanzaron lo suficiente”.Cuando Thomas Jefferson escribió, en la Declaración de Independencia,  “que todos los hombres son creados iguales” él era dueño de esclavos; otros próceres fundadores poseyeron esclavos; el presidente George Washington poseía esclavos; y esclavos también sirvieron a los presidentes James Madison, James Monroe, Andrew Jackson, William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, James Knox Polk y Zachary Taylor. Mano de obra esclava ayudó a construir la Casa Blanca en Washington, D.C.Este legado de contradicción, de desigualdad y de racismo, con el que los norteamericanos y los episcopales, negros y blancos, siguen viviendo hoy es un legado que la Iglesia Episcopal busca confrontar a través de su obra de reconciliación racial.El obispo primado Michael Curry dirigió un peregrinaje de reconciliación de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo a Ghana en enero. El grupo posa para una foto luego de un oficio eucarístico el domingo 22 de enero en la iglesia catedral de la Santísima Trinidad en Accra. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.En 2015, la Convención General aprobó un presupuesto que enfatizaba la reconciliación racial, algo en lo que Curry se ha centrado y en lo que le ha pedido a la Iglesia que se ocupe desde su instalación como Obispo Primado en noviembre de ese año.El legado de la esclavitud es también algo con lo que Andrew Waldo, el obispo de Alta Carolina del Sur que creció en el Sur segregado y quien ha estudiado la historia de su familia, ha tenido que lidiar en su vida.“Vengo de una familia que ha estado en este país durante mucho tiempo, muchas generaciones de esclavistas de Virginia, Carolina del Sur y Misisipí, probablemente dos docenas de oficiales confederados, de la infantería naval, de la caballería, de todo”, dijo Waldo en una entrevista en el castillo de Costa del Cabo, otro castillo de esclavos no lejos del de Elmina.El patio del castillo de Costa del Cabo. Los esclavos ocupaban las mazmorras [o calabozos], los soldados el próximo nivel y los oficiales el nivel superior. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.Waldo hizo estos descubrimientos mientras estudiaba la genealogía de su familia, no porque sus padres se lo comentaran. Empezó por descubrir cuán profundamente implicada estaba su familia en la esclavitud de personas. Antepasados suyos poseían plantaciones en Virginia y en el sur de Misisipí, y su tatarabuelo probablemente asistía a una iglesia episcopal junto con Jefferson Davis, que sirvió como presidente de la Confederación durante la guerra de Secesión.“Me di cuenta de que si iba a ser fiel al llamado que Dios me hacía como reconciliador, no podía dejar que esa historia se quedara allí, que yo iba de alguna manera a encontrar medios de curar, de reparar, de reconectar”, dijo Waldo, afirmando que el peregrinaje de la reconciliación le añadió un sentido de urgencia a su labor.“Cuando uno ve cuantos cientos de miles, millones de personas pasaron a través de estos lugares, y se sentaron en estas mazmorras”, dijo, para llegar a Estados Unidos a enfrentarse al látigo del amo, ser bautizados y despojados de sus nombres. “De lo único que puedo estar seguro es de que mis antepasados le hicieron eso a personas, de manera que yo tenía que cambiar el rumbo para mi familia”.La aguja roja de la iglesia de Cristo se destaca sobre los niveles superiores del castillo de Costa del Cabo, donde se almacenaba a los esclavos y donde los británicos tuvieron una vez una capilla anglicana encima de una mazmorra de esclavos. La iglesia de Cristo fue la primera iglesia anglicana de Ghana. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.Waldo también está cambiando el rumbo de su diócesis, donde a los seis años de su episcopado y luego de haber tanteado la “disposición del terreno”, creó un comité de raza y reconciliación. Los 13 miembros del comité salieron de un grupo de 40 personas —todas ellas con “profundo interés” en la conversación— que solicitaron un nombramiento.A través de historias personales, incluida la propia de Waldo, los episcopales de Alta Carolina del Sur están empezando a confrontar el legado del racismo y la esclavitud en sus vidas y sus comunidades. Lo mismo está empezando a suceder en un nivel más profundo a través de la Iglesia Episcopal, razón por la cual el obispo de Oklahoma, Ed Konieczny, luego de unirse al peregrinaje de la reconciliación de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo en 2016, sugirió una particularmente para obispos.Konieczny inició una conversación con Robert Radtke, presidente de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo, preguntándole si el Obispo Primado había ido en peregrinación a Ghana; un año después Curry encabezaba una.“Michael Curry acababa de ser electo Obispo Primado y una de sus principales prioridades era la reconciliación racial… lo que yo le decía a Rob era que como un privilegiado obispo blanco de la Iglesia a quien se le pedía que hablara de la reconciliación racial como una voz de reconciliación, yo no sentía que tenía la autoridad para hacerlo porque provenía de un lugar diferente”, dijo Konieczny, que creció en el condado de Orange, California, y tenía 20 años de carrera en la fuerza pública antes del sacerdocio.“Todavía no tengo la autoridad, pero este viaje me da una historia que contar acerca de mi propia reconciliación con quien soy, de como he sido parte de este conflicto y discordia raciales en mi país… Recuerdo, mientras crecía, de la manera en que los adultos en mi entorno hablaban acerca de los negros y de las palabras que usaban”, dijo. Él compartió la historia de cómo, cuando su estación de policía se integró por primera vez, sus colegas rehusaron usar el mismo vestidor que el agente negro.La peregrinación a Ghana, según él, le hizo darse cuenta de que todo lo que le habían enseñado acerca de la esclavitud y el racismo era erróneo.“No me dijeron la verdad, y luego fue sencillamente la colisión de mi mundo con este otro mundo y el reconocimiento de que soy un racista. Afortunadamente, un racista en vías de recuperación, pero ciertamente, si participé abiertamente, o si la condoné, la ignoré o contribuí a que se dijeran e hicieran ciertas cosas, a que la gente actuara, me pongo ahora en un lugar donde tengo al menos algo que decir y puedo suscitar las interrogantes y las personas pueden al menos reflexionar y escudriñar en sus propias vidas”, dijo Konieczny.Los peregrinos depositan una corona de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo en el castillo de Elmina en Costa del Cabo, Ghana. Los esclavos eran sacados del castillo y cargados en los barcos a través de “la puerta sin retorno”. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.La peregrinación desafía las nociones preconcebidas acerca de la esclavitud y de la trata de esclavos trasatlántica de cada participante.“La narrativa que tantos de nosotros hemos inventado era que el gran mal de la esclavitud era realmente ser esclavo, alguien que estaba siendo sujeto con un animal en una plantación”, dijo Spellers, cuya bisabuela fue esclava. “Yo no tenía idea de la gravedad y la profundidad del sufrimiento que había tenido lugar antes de que alguien llegase incluso a los barcos de esclavos o antes de llegar a Costa del Cabo, de cuántos murieron en el camino.“Uno de los miembros del grupo dijo, ‘este fue el holocausto africano, ¿verdad?’ y yo me di cuenta de que así había sido. Insisto, ello me ayuda a entender por qué el tema de la raza resulta tan difícil para nosotros de abordar en Estados Unidos, por qué sigue reapareciendo… porque aún sigue habiendo muchas cosas de las que no hemos hablado”.La Iglesia puede ofrecer un lugar seguro para tener conversaciones difíciles que pueden conllevar dolor, incertidumbre y ambigüedad, pero conversaciones revestidas de amor y cuidado mutuos, un lugar seguro donde todos podemos compartir sinceramente y adentrarnos en el futuro, dijo Curry.“Mi esperanza es que este viaje nos ayudará a exigir y rehacer una historia común que tenemos, un pasado doloroso, no en aras de la culpa ni para regodearnos en el pasado, sino por nuestro bien, el de negros, blancos, cobrizos, amarillos y pardos, encontrando los medios de enfrentar nuestro pasado y luego tomando en otra dirección y creando un futuro nuevo”, dijo él, citando las palabras de la poeta Maya Angelou: “La historia, a pesar de su sufrimiento desgarrador, no puede evadirse, sino que ha de enfrentarse con el coraje necesario para no vivirla de nuevo”.“Ese es nuestro objetivo y es así cómo el pasado se redime y se reafirma un nuevo futuro”, dio Curry. “Y esa es la tarea de la Iglesia Episcopal”.– Lynette Wilson es redactora/reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Press Release Service The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Anglican Communion, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Press Release Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Africa, Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Albany, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA El peregrinaje de reconciliación a Ghana es un ‘regreso a casa’, dice el Obispo Primado Los peregrinos se arrepienten de la complicidad de la Iglesia y de EE.UU. en la trata trasatlántica de esclavos This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis last_img read more

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Young Anglicans in South Africa create garden on ‘Mandela Day’

first_imgYoung Anglicans in South Africa create garden on ‘Mandela Day’ Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Anglican Communion News Service] Young people from a parish in a suburb of Cape Town, South Africa, have cultivated a garden at their church as a way of remembering Nelson Mandela on what was his birthday, July 18.Nelson Mandela International Day commemorates the lifetime of service Mandela gave to South Africa and the world. The tradition has developed of taking 67 minutes to do something for others on Mandela day, celebrating the 67 years that Mandela dedicated to social justice.Full article. Tags Posted Jul 19, 2017 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events Youth & Young Adults The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Africa, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Anglican Communion, Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA center_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Nelson Mandela, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Collierville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME last_img read more

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