Researchers counter autism with technology

first_imgShe can cheer a touchdown, dance to Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” and play “Simon Says,” but she doesn’t have a heartbeat. Meet one of the most recent additions to the Psychology Department’s family, Kelly the robot. With two robots named Brian and Kelly, professors are running an innovative study on autism therapy in the Notre Dame Center for Families and Children. In what is affectionately known as the Robot Autism Project, professors Joshua Diehl, Charles Crowell and Michael Villano use these interactive humanoid robots to improve therapy for children with autism. This is an extremely prevalent issue, Diehl said, approximating one person in every 100 people has autism. “We know a little about what causes autism, and there’s a lot of focus on understanding it,” he said. “But there’s little focus on how we can effectively help the children by improving the therapies out there.” This study is shifting that focus toward technology, Crowell said. He and Villano recognized their opportunity when they saw Aldebran Robotics demonstrating the Nao model robot at a conference two years ago. After gathering the funds, they asked Diehl to join them, and the study began last fall. “The suggestion was including robot technology in therapy and observing how it might open doors that might otherwise remain unopened to children with autism,” Crowell said. To do this, Diehl said, they set up a therapy session involving a therapist, a child with an Autism Spectral Disorder (ASD) and the robot. From a room protected by a one-way mirror, a puppeteer controls the behaviors of the robot. “The initial idea was that the robot would be an interaction partner who the child could practice carrying on or initiating a conversation with,” Diehl said. “But there are so many other roles that the robot can take. It can provide encouragement, or it can play different games and work on imitation skills.” When a child practices a behavior correctly, Kelly the robot will answer with positive feedback, often in the form of a dance or motion, Villano said. These include “Thriller” and raising the robot’s arms in the air as a “touchdown.” The robot can also be programmed to specifically reflect a child’s interests and encourage him or her with related movements. “Over the summer, one kid really liked swimming and the movie ‘Shrek,’” Villano said. “So we’d have it do swimming motions for encouragement and it would talk about Shrek.” But this robot isn’t your average toy-store robot, Crowell said. In just playing “Simon Says,” the robot uses complex programs to detect movement, answer the child’s requests and mimic actions. “It’s about two feet tall and is packed with a lot of technology. Just like a real human, it has senses,” he said. “It has cameras that allow vision, voice synthesis mechanisms for speech, and other sensors like sonar, as well as a touch sensitive part of its head.” Since its beginning, the three professors agree the project has taken off rapidly. “It’s gone very quickly from a pipe dream to a full-blown study,” Diehl said. Yet this study wouldn’t have happened without large collaborative efforts from the three professors, a team of Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s students and the community, Villano said. Each of these components has put forth hard work that has moved the project forward at this lightning-quick pace. “One of the most important things that we have is a group of students that are amazing that have given so much to the project,” Diehl said. “They’ve made major intellectual contributions to the development and institution of the project.” Some of these students include Notre Dame graduate student Karen Tang, junior Margaret Millea, junior Kristen Uhland and Brynn Thomas, who is a senior at Saint Mary’s. Thomas joined the study after taking a class based around autism. “I have a sister with high-functioning autism, so when Professor Diehl came into the class to talk about his research study, I thought it was interesting,” she said. “So I asked him how I could be a part of it and got involved in this.” Millea said she asked Diehl during office hours, and the project has been very rewarding. “Autism in general is an interesting field. There’s just so much we don’t know,” she said. “I like that Professor Diehl focuses on the strengths of the kids rather than their deficits.” Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s students have actually done the majority of the robot’s programming, Villano said. Other ways they work on the project include acting as the therapist or puppeteer in the sessions. Diehl said some of these students will work as interns on the project next summer. “We have a road map. In late fall or early second semester this year, we’re going to collect another set of pilot data,” he said. “By next summer, we’re going to go full-tilt-boogey and we have funding for a couple of students to work with us.” They are always looking for talented students interested in contributing to the ASD community from all areas of expertise, Diehl said. In the end, it’s about what can be done for the children with autism. “This is bringing technology to a problem that effects very real people,” Villano said. “The applied side of this is rewarding because we’re impacting these families’ lives.” Crowell agreed and added that the Center for Families and Children is a vital aspect of the community now. “Dr. Diehl is probably too modest to point this out, but this center offers a variety of services to the community,” he said. “So we are fortunate to have this center as part of the University, part of the Psychology Department and part of the community.” Even without being part of a center, anyone can make an effort to support people with autism. Villano, as an assistant Scout Master for a Boy Scout troop with two autistic members, has seen this outside of the study and said patience is key in developing communication. “They sometimes will be aloof or shout at you, but patience goes a long way,” he said. “The interaction may be unusual, but you can try to interact in ways that are meaningful to them.” This project has become a meaningful way to interact with the children, Crowell said. A child with autism is more drawn to the physical world because of a lack of social skills. The robot then acts as a bridge between this physical world and a more human world for the child. “We have this device that has an object nature as well as a simulated human nature,” he said. “Now there is a way to probe a child who would be attracted to this object and bring them to the human realm because it behaves like a human and can emulate human behaviors.”last_img read more

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ND admits students

first_imgWhen most colleges see increases in applications, they admit more students, assuming a large number of them will choose to attend other schools. But Bob Mundy, director of admissions, said the yield for admitted applicants who chose to attend the University last year was unpredictably high, leading to a decrease in the number of acceptances this year. “Clearly we think we’ve become a more popular option out there,” Mundy said. According to Don Bishop, associate vice president for undergraduate enrollment, 16,952 high school seniors applied for a spot in the Class of 2016 and 3,850 were admitted. Last year, the University received 16,520 applications and accepted 4,019 students, Bishop said. The number of international applicants and applicants of color also rose this year, he said. Bishop said this year’s acceptance rate was 22.7 percent, down from 24 percent last year and 29 percent two years ago. He said 2,500 applicants were put on the waitlist. Because so many admitted applicants chose to attend Notre Dame, not a single student was accepted off the waitlist last year, Mundy said. “We’ve admitted about 170 fewer students than last year, with the goal of being able to admit some students off the waitlist,” he said. Admitted applicants’ academic qualifications remained impressive, with a median SAT score of 1460 and ACT score of 33, Bishop said. The median high school class performance for the admitted class was also the top one to two percent, he said.   “We could admit 75 percent of our applicants and still have a group that would be very successful here,” Mundy said. Bishop said these statistics have improved greatly in the past few years. “About a fourth or a fifth of the class that five years ago would have gained admission, in today’s competition, would not,” Bishop said. The number of admitted legacy children remains higher than at most elite colleges, Bishop said. Twenty-four percent of this year’s admitted class is a legacy compared to about 12 percent at most top 10 schools, he said, but this is because legacy applicants tend to be very qualified. “Notre Dame alumni have traditionally had more children, and Notre Dame alumni children are more loyal to applying to Notre Dame,” Bishop said. “Even though there is this special consideration, a disproportionate … share of our top students are children of alumni.” The increase in exceptional applicants and decrease in available spots contributed to more selectivity in the admissions process, Bishop said. “We’re more selective, but we’re more on mission,” Bishop said. “Once the numbers get so high in the academic credentials of the student, it’s not necessary to continue to use those numbers to distinguish one student from another.” Bishop said admissions officers choose qualified students by examining characteristics that fit the Notre Dame educational philosophy. “You start looking at the other attributes … [such as] intellectual drive and ambition … their creativity, their sense of service to others, their leadership … [and] being active in service and faith,” he said. Because most of the admitted applicants will have been accepted to other top schools, many students’ decisions will rely on financial aid, Bishop said. “The financial aid staff is going to be working extremely hard on counseling families and assisting them,” he said. “Notre Dame will likely spend over $27 million in financial aid to the freshman class, and that’s gift aid. Over the course of four years, it will be over $100 million.” Bishop said other accepted applicants will base their decisions on campus visits and current students should look out for them. “All the students on campus should know that we’re going to have a lot of visiting admitted students who are going to be comparing us with a lot of great choices,” he said. “We’re hoping that our students will take this opportunity to reach out to the visiting students and tell them about Notre Dame.” Overall, Mundy said he is pleased with the Class of 2016. “It’s safe to say we feel really good about the group as it stands right now,” he said.last_img read more

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Belles honor fellow students

first_imgSaint Mary’s students have a chance to honor fellow Belles who are using their education to make a difference through the Belles Honoring Belles Award. Student body vice president Meghan Casey said she hopes students will take the time to recognize those students who stand out through the award. “At the beginning of the year, the Student Government Association (SGA) held a retreat the week before classes began,” Casey said. “We thought that it would be a good idea to use the idea of the Women Honoring Women event that happens in the spring semester and do a ‘student honoring student’ dinner.” According to the application, the nominees should be women who are influential both in and out of the classroom and who empower other Saint Mary’s College students to pursue a life of intellectual vigor, aesthetic appreciation, religious sensibility and social responsibility. “Students will be able to be among other students who people nominated because they embody what they believe a Saint Mary’s woman is,” Casey said. The nomination form asks about the nominees’ background information, which includes their majors, their involvement on and off campus, their academic accolades and other achievements. The form also asks for a description of how the nominee represents the College, their impact on campus and their impact on the world. “Fifteen honorees will be chosen from among the nominees and will be honored at a reception on Monday, Nov. 26,” Casey said. “If your nominee is chosen to be honored, you will be invited to speak for a few moments on her behalf.” The reception for the nominees and nominators will be held at 6:30 p.m. in the Stapleton Lounge in LeMans Hall. One honoree will be chosen at the reception as the Belle of the Year. “I am hoping that Student Academic Council continues this dinner because it is necessary to recognize those who go the extra mile as a student here at Saint Mary’s,” Casey said. “While this is the first year we are having the Belles Honoring Belles award, I think it would be a great way to inspire students at the College to encourage their fellow Belles to push harder at making a difference for our school and the world.” The deadline for the nominations is Tuesday, Nov. 20 at 12 p.m. For more information or to nominate a Belle, contact Meghan Casey at [email protected]last_img read more

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Mendoza receives No. 1 ranking

first_imgMendoza College of Business has done it again.The College pulled off a five-peat, achieving the No. 1 spot for the fifth year in a row in Bloomberg Businessweek’s 2014 ranking of Best Undergraduate Business Schools.“What makes Mendoza unique among business schools is our clearly defined mission to develop leaders who view business as a force for good in society,” Roger D. Huang, the Martin J. Gillen Dean of the Mendoza College, said. “A lot of schools now say they have the same mission.”Emily Hoffmann | The Observer According to a press release from the College, Mendoza’s undergraduate studies program ranked first in student satisfaction, second in academic quality and fourth in employer satisfaction. The College earned “A+” scores for teaching quality, facilities and services and job placement.Huang said Mendoza’s top ranking this year is due to the efforts of many groups, programs and individuals across the entire University.“The undergraduate admissions office recruits students who are passionate about their interests as well as high academic achievers,” Huang said. “The career center works tirelessly to place our students in jobs. The Division of Student Affairs is dedicated to providing students with the kind of experience that is the essence of Notre Dame.”Huang said numerous alumni who help mentor and help students are also to thank.“We describe ourselves as the Notre Dame family, and the ranking is a family achievement,” Huang said.In the midst of the new digital revolution, Huang said the College has evolved to teach students newly important skill sets such as business analytics and social media marketing. In addition, he said, the global marketplace has replaced the domestic marketplace, which has elicited a need to educate students on how to obtain a “big picture” perspective.“At Mendoza, we focus on what I call MAGI – Mission, Academic excellence, Globalization and Innovation. Together, these four areas encompass a lot of new developments, from coursework to international studies opportunities,” Huang said. “We must continually innovate to address the ever-changing business world.”The College plans to continue expanding the MAGI vision, incorporating innovative coursework and expanding global programs to remain a trendsetter in business education, Huang said.“The higher business education landscape is rapidly changing, and we have challenges on all fronts,” he said.Huang said student comments published in Bloomberg’s survey spoke about business ethics, sustainability and corporate social responsibility permeating the classroom.“That’s very inspiring and humbling for a dean to hear,” Huang said.The magazine’s ranking, which was released April 4, looked at a total of 132 U.S. undergraduate business programs. The report was released on Businessweek.com.According to the press release, University of Virginia’s McIntire School of Commerce ranked second and Cornell’s Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management ranked third.Bloomberg Businessweek’s undergraduate business school rankings are based on five components: student assessment, academic quality metrics, employer opinion, median starting salary and a “feeder school” score.The Mendoza College of Business, which currently enrolls 1,950 undergraduate students, offers students a choice of five majors: accountancy, finance, marketing, management entrepreneurship, management consulting and IT management.Tags: best undergraduate business school, business, five peat, Mendoza, mendoza college, mendoza college of business, mendoza undergraduate, number one business schoollast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s hosts environmental film premiere

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Environmental Action Coalition (SMEAC) hosted a premiere of “Disruption” on Sunday. The environmental film, written and directed by Kelly Nyks and Jared P. Scott, was officially released Sunday online as an informative build-up to the upcoming People’s Climate March, SMEAC president Erin Cisneros said.Cisneros said the viewing brought together those on campus who are, or who hope to be, active in environmental change.“It’s kind of not actually what I expected,” Cisneros said. “It was a lot more colorful, and really informative for what’s going on. A lot of these films we watch, I feel they put the icing on top, open the people’s eyes to what’s going on, and the speakers in the film were really informative.”SMEAC secretary Gwen Murphy said she was surprised the film approached climate and environmental awareness from a social justice perspective.“So many times, people focus on the scientific,” Murphy said. “I think it’s a lot more powerful and will reach a lot more people this way.”Assistant professor of Political Science and Gender & Women’s Studies Sonalini Sapra said she organized the event after receiving and email from 350.org, international environmental group, asking if she would be willing to host a screening.While the film seeks to raise awareness of climate change and environmental justice, it also highlights the march planned for Sept. 21 and 22 in New York City, Sapra said.“[It is] the largest action in support of political action to address global warming. It is timed to coincide with the climate summit called by Ban Ki-Moon, for world leaders in advance of the next scheduled round of climate change negotiations in 2015,” Sapra said. “The purpose of this rally and other supporting events taking place around the world is to demonstrate the magnitude of support for effective action against climate change.”Sapra will be traveling with seven students to participate in the rally, Sapra said. Many Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s students whom Sapra has spoken with recognize that climate change and environmental degradation is a pressing issue, she said.“I’ve had students in my classes who understand that climate change is the ‘right to life’ issue of our time,” Sapra said. “I think students recognize that the impacts of climate change are disproportionately being felt by the poor and marginalized, and [they] want the U.S. to be at the forefront of modeling more sustainable behavior for the rest of the world.” The film suggested that bystanders to the environmental injustices that occur today are actually perpetrators, Cisneros said.“When you see people neglect something, then you become the issue,” Cisneros said. “I’m hoping people just see that we care, because we have nowhere else to go.”Sapra said Saint Mary’s should be at the forefront of sustainability initiatives as a Catholic college.“My hope is that students find the activism they encounter at this march to be inspiring and encourages them to raise the profile of environmental [and] sustainability issues amongst the student body and administration at Saint Mary’s,” Sapra said.Cisneros said the majority of the student body’s lack of activism was obvious in their inability to recycle properly.“People don’t know how to recycle,” Cisneros said. “We are very individualistic as a country. We need to be aware of what’s going on. People complain about how this summer was mild, and now it’s hot, and last winter was crazy. I’m hoping that [environmental change] becomes common knowledge now.”Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame should divest from fossil fuel companies in order to take part in environmental initiatives, Sapra said.“I think divestment from these dirty and dangerous companies, would send a strong message and keep SMC and ND more in accordance with their Catholic social justice mission,” Sapra said.SMEAC will discuss how to approach environmental change on campus during their first official meeting Thursday at 6:30 p.m. on the island of Lake Marion weather permitting, or in Rainbeaux Lounge in Les Mans Hall, Cisneros said.“We just want to be involved; we want to bring awareness to Saint Mary’s. That’s our goal this year,” Cisneros said. “We want to make a difference, and I think if we start here we can expand.”Tags: Climate March, Disruption, environmental action coalition, green, Premierelast_img read more

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Notre Dame Forum to consider presidential debates

first_imgNotre Dame will host a forum to analyze the 2016 presidential election in the context of previous and upcoming presidential and vice presidential debates, according to a University press release Tuesday.This year’s Notre Dame Forum, titled “Debating Our Future,” will invite members of the Notre Dame community to join discussions surrounding the election, examining the role of debate in the democratic process, the release stated.According to the release, the forum will also feature an analysis of past debates, led by former debate moderators Jim Lehrer and Bob Schieffer, as well as Dorothy Ridings, former president of the League of Women Voters. Lehrer, Ridings and University President Fr. John Jenkins all currently serve on the Commission on Presidential Debates (CPD).The first forum event will be held 7 p.m. on Sept. 14 in the Leighton Concert Hall of the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center, according to the release. Jenkins will serve as convener.“Healthy democracies foster serious, open debate among candidates of the issues,” Jenkins said in the release. “Our focus on this year’s presidential debates will provide an opportunity to reflect on the issues, evaluate the candidates and consider the character of our nation’s electoral process.”The CPD is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization that has sponsored all presidential debates since 1988 and has led a number of additional voter education initiatives, the release stated. Jenkins was elected to the CPD’s board of directors in 2011.According to the release, the Notre Dame Forum was launched by Jenkins in 2005 and has since featured talks by experts on a variety of issues, such as immigration, sustainability, global health, the global marketplace, K-12 education and faith.The University will host campus debate watches and other events in the weeks leading up to the 2016 election, according to the release. The CPD has announced it will host presidential debates Sept. 26, Oct. 9 and Oct. 19, with a vice presidential debate Oct. 4.Tags: 2016 Election, 2016 presidential campaign, Commission on Presidential Debates, Notre Dame Forumlast_img read more

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Legend of stage and screen Rita Moreno discusses mental health, representation

first_imgLegendary actress and political activist Rita Moreno gave a talk at Leighton Concert Hall on Thursday, discussing the obstacles faced and joys experienced in her more than 70 years in the entertainment industry.Moreno said when her career first began at the age of 17, she was plagued by stereotypes and was often typecast into a range of narrow, repetitive and degrading roles. “I was playing a lot of roles in films that I didn’t especially like,” Moreno said. “We were constantly playing oversexed girls who were ignorant, who couldn’t read.”Moreno quickly grew frustrated by the lack of diversity in show business at the time and that the fact that she was a Puerto Rican drastically limited the number and kind of roles that were available to her.“It was very depressing to be constantly playing those parts,” Moreno said. “If you were a Latina, there was just no place for you anywhere.”Growing up in New York City as the daughter of a Puerto Rican immigrant, Moreno faced a great deal of discrimination during her childhood. This, compounded by the lack of representation and bias in the the film industry, she said, led to mental health problems in her personal life. “I didn’t have role models then. There were none then — none,” Moreno said. “I grew up thinking that I had no value, that I had no worth.” These problems eventually led Moreno to start going to therapy, a choice she regards as “the best thing” she ever did for herself. Moreno said the stigma surrounding mental health, especially in the black and Latino communities, is still prevalent today.“Latinos and the black community also think you have to be crazy to be in therapy, and of course that’s not so, what you want to do is get rid of your craziness,” Moreno said.Though she faced many trials and tribulations, things started to change for Moreno with her iconic role of Anita in the classic 1961 film “West Side Story,” she said. Moreno spoke at length about the film and the profound influence it had on her. In the character of Anita, Moreno found someone to admire. “She became my role model,” Moreno said. “She respected herself, she had great feelings about herself and I began to see that I felt that way about myself as well.”Moreno has had a long and storied career in film and television. She is one of the few people ever to be awarded an “EGOT,” or an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar and a Tony — four of the entertainment industry’s highest accolades. In addition to “West Side Story,” her career has included hits like a role in the 1970s children’s program “The Electric Company” and the Netflix series “One Day at a Time,” but Moreno said entertainment has never been her only interest. For a long time, she has also been passionate about politics, news, civil rights and other activism.“What really, really empowered me was when I became a political activist,” Moreno said. “It’s a community service when you’re helping people. It takes you away from all the things that matter to you when you’re an actor or actress, when you’re so self-absorbed. It’s served me very well.”Another major topic in Moreno’s talk was the upcoming remake of “West Side Story.” The remake is being directed and produced by Steven Spielberg, and Tony Kushner — the playwright who created “Angels in America” — is writing the script. Moreno is set to be an executive producer for the film and will also be playing the role of Valentina, Doc’s widow, in the remake. “I am so excited that I can barely stand it. I mean, talk about going full circle,” Moreno said.The remake will not be a modern retelling of the story, however. Still set in 1957, it will feature the original’s classic numbers and original style, but this time, Moreno said, special attention was paid to make sure everyone in the film who is supposed to be Hispanic is played by a Hispanic performance, and that young, talented actors and actresses were selected for those roles. “[Spielberg and Kushner] decided that they were going to kill themselves finding Hispanic, young actors and actresses to make the movie,” she said. “All of the Sharks are Hispanic, all of them. Young and Hispanic. Maria is 17 and Ansel Elgort is doing Tony, which is kind of pretty fabulous.”Moreno’s talk ended with a discussion about the state of Hollywood and the film industry today. Moreno said the industry still has a long way to go.“You still see scripts with a breakdown in the script and it will often say ‘prefer a latino for this’ or ‘prefers a black for this’ or ‘prefer a Chinese person for this,’” she said at a press conference Thursday. “When that stops happening, then you know that you have a really fair kind of system going on.”Moreno also said during her lecture that she was hopeful about change, saying representation for minorities has improved from when she first started out in the industry. She cited the recent increase of film representation in the black community as an example of how things have changed.“If nothing else but because the black community has got some great actors and great stars and great movies — I’m so thrilled to death about that, it’s so important,” Moreno said. “Now, we have to get better representation for Latinos, which we don’t have in Hollywood and especially in films. I think we are under-represented.”In the closing minutes of her talk, Moreno focused on the need to keep pursuing better representation for Latinos and other minorities in the entertainment industry.“The door is somewhat open, but we still have a long way to go,” she said.Tags: EGOT, One Day at a Time, Rita Moreno, West side storylast_img read more

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Annual hackathon promotes creative problem-solving

first_imgTeams of undergraduate students will design, create and present a digital application to improve the Notre Dame community in the fourth annual Hesburgh Library Hackathon this Friday, Saturday and Sunday.“We want this to be an inclusive event,” emerging technologies librarian and Hackathon co-chair Randy Harrison said. “It’s totally fine if this is your first experience with coding. We want students to see the resources in the library and see the library as a central hub for intellectual activity.”At its conception in 2016, the Hackathon drew about 20 participants. This year, the Hackathon is expected to register approximately 80-100 students and reward larger prizes, starting with $5,000 for first place. Students will register on Friday evening in the Hesburgh Library, form teams and start developing ideas for their app until the library closes at 11 p.m. Teams will continue creating their products when the library opens on Saturday until its closure at midnight. Competitors finalize projects and presentations Sunday morning. Lightning talks and judging will occur Sunday afternoon. The theme for this year’s event is “Synergy: Holistic Solutions for the Whole Student.” Through this framework, students will develop code, attend lightning tutorials and work together in diverse groups of two to four students that develop the app from start to finish. “As a first-year, Moreau helps you see the student as larger than just grades,” Harrison said. “This is a big part of the first-year curriculum. We complement this with the Hackathon, where students build apps towards that theme. They can make apps that help students find study buddies on campus and succeed as a student in the broadest term.”An integral objective of the Hackathon is to raise students’ awareness of the technology and resources that are available at the library. Additionally, Harrison said, the event will help increase students’ digital literacy and help them grow more apt at using the library as a tool for research. “Hackathons are great places for students to learn coding skills and work with other people,” Harrison said. “When you have the opportunity to get students involved in active learning and building stuff, you learn so much more than just a simple curriculum. You’re faced with real-world problems. It helps teach lateral thinking, which helps you figure out how to get around a wall once you’ve hit it.”The goals of the Hackathon include promoting scholarship and research, enhancing educational experiences and development, bolstering digital programs and services, transforming library spaces and building a culture of continual improvement and service quality. “What has changed since the beginning is our ability to fulfill these goals,” Harrison said. “When we ask teams to develop apps that help students here at Notre Dame, that goes back into the larger ecosystem of information and applications on campus. The library is just a part of that. The apps are about making campus and the world a better place. The information ecosystem becomes richer, and that gets back to the library.”Throughout the weekend, coaches are available to support student developers in strategy, coding mishaps, methodology, design and presentation practices. Judging on Sunday will evaluate five key areas of students’ projects: innovation, impact, usability, teamwork and presentation. The judges hail from several different disciplines across campus, such as RecSports, Information and Communications Technologies, digital collections and outreach. Presentations are expected to take under five minutes. After the competition is over, competitors will be provided with the chance to develop their apps further through the IDEA Center. Additionally, competitors have opportunities to further engage with the technology community through the South Bend Code School and other local hackathons. Competitors are “becoming-professionals,” Harrison said.“They’re doing everything a professional would do. They’re making things and putting them in front of other people,” he said. “We want a gamut of students because it’s a win for everyone involved — this Hackathon is valuable for all different types of people.”Tags: computer hacking, Computer science, technologylast_img read more

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New York’s Public High Schools Moving Football To March

first_imgStock Image.LATHAM — The New York State Public High School Athletic Association announced Wednesday that football, volleyball and competitive cheer fall seasons will be postponed until March to address concerns associated with the novel Coronavirus.“We’ve spent two days speaking with nearly 500 athletic directors across the state and it’s clear that administering high-risk fall sports during the COVID-19 pandemic presents a significant challenge for our member schools,” said Dr. Robert Zayas, NYSPHSAA executive director. “These are unprecedented times and, unfortunately, difficult decisions will have to be made to address this ongoing crisis.”As a result of the move, the start date for the spring sports season has been moved from March 15 to April 19.Low and moderate risk fall sports practices are still scheduled to begin Sept. 21 for those schools and sections who have determined it’s feasible to host interscholastic athletics. Those sports include girls tennis, cross country, girls swimming and diving, boys and girls soccer, and field hockey. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Man Wanted For Allegedly Stealing From Local Bakery Arrested

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) MGN Stock Image.ELLICOTT – A man was arrested this week following an alleged theft at a local bakery in May.Town of Ellicott Police say 40-year-old David Larkin was arrested on a warrant after he was pulled over by New York State Troopers on Tuesday.Police allege Larkin stole several items from the Fluvanna Avenue Extension business on Sunday, May 17.Officers say with help from the Cattaraugus County Sheriff’s Office, they used surveillance video to identify the man. A warrant was then issued for his arrest, and now more than four months later, the man has been taken into custody.However, because of the new bail reform laws, police say Larkin was issued an appearance ticket and released.He is scheduled to appear in the Town of Ellicott Court at a later date.last_img read more

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