Street trade needs controls – John Roughan

first_imgNZ Herald 20 october 2012Papatoetoe must have been a pleasant little town on Great South Rd before Auckland spread like a tidal wave in the 1960s and covered the surrounding county in state houses and bungalows for the population boom. The town still had its own council in the 1970s when I started work and sometimes covered its meetings. The mayor and council were quiet, practical types who knew every building in the borough, though even by then there was no discernable boundary between Papatoetoe, Mangere and the rest of what would soon become Manukau City. Urban life has not been kind to the old town. Today people drive through Hunters Corner and hesitate to slow down because the place has become notorious for street prostitution. The shop owners have been complaining about it for years and they are not talking about women entirely, street prostitution is the rough trade.…The problem is nobody really wants to discuss this one. Not Parliament, where their bill is now long overdue for a second reading. Not news reports, using words and illustrations that leave an impression the conflict involves pretty young females and fuddy duddies. Not even McCracken, who doesn’t strike me as a homophobe. Like every former policeman he sounds no longer shocked at anything. When a transvestite tapped on his car window while he was taking his child to school the other day his response, as he describes it, was milder than mine would have been. He doesn’t say transvestite. When that term was used in a booklet the boards put out a few months ago with the help of the Auckland Council, one of the more sensitive council members cautioned them that they might be referring to transgendered people. It is not just the propositioning that causes concern – McCracken reckons the customers sometimes approach children in daylight – it is the noise at night and the filth left around for residents and shopkeepers to clean up the next day. He says Hunters Corner is not the only shopping centre in South Auckland suffering in this way. The Mangere-Otahuhu and Manurewa local boards have joined his in pressing for the legislation. But the others keep quieter about it. In July, when they jointly put out the booklet of graphic testimony from retailers and residents, they thought the bill was about to come back from a select committee for its crucial conscience vote in the House.….Bylaws, he says, are useless. Unless they are made under the authority of a particular piece of legislation, police don’t believe they can enforce them. What the police believe matters more than legal argument. If the police don’t believe a bylaw will stand up in court they are not going to invest time and effort on the streets. The problem, he explains, is that when Parliament legalised prostitution nine years ago the act made no reference to street vendors. It assumed that once the industry was legal all the practitioners would move into licensed premises and councils would have had control over their location. It wouldn’t seem very hard to amend the law now to extend that control to the streets, but for some reason the legislators seem reluctant. Those who voted for legalisation in 2003 may be unwilling to acknowledge any deficiency in it. Those who opposed it probably have no stomach to revive the subject.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/opinion/news/article.cfm?c_id=466&objectid=10841704last_img read more

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Bulldogs Spikers Get ‘W’s’

first_imgThe Freshmen team played Richmond tonight, while the Varsity and JV took on EIAC foe Rushville.From Coach Trenkamp:  ‘Tonight the freshman Lady Bulldogs defeated Richmond in 3 close games.  Serving is what got us the 2 wins along with positive attitude and hustle.  We were able to dig the ball and make some good hits.  Serving us up was 12pts 6aces was Brayleigh Patterson.  Digging in the back with coverage all over was Sophie Lee.  We played games 1 & 2 with 6 girls and game 3 with 8.  Scores were 25-18, 22-25, 15-14.’From Coach Prickel: ‘The Batesville JV volleyball team earned a much needed conference win vs. Rushville in convincing fashion. Scores were 25-12, 25-18. Grace Sarringhaus paced the team with 9 service points, while Nikki Fox added 7 points including 3 aces. Katie Bedel was aggressive with 7 kills in 16 swings, while Fox had 5 kills in only 8 attempts to lead the front row attack. Kerigan Haskamp and Shelby Westerfeld each earned a stuff block. Grace Laudick helped the team with 18 good digs from her Libero position.’In the varsity match the lady bulldogs showed little signs of weakness.  The girls played a complete game, minimized their errors and played with a relaxed sense of urgency.  We will have to polish some of that up moving forward, but it was a good/needed win (25-6, 25-16, 25-8).  We had multiple hitters over .400 for the first time this season and our hitting percentage as a team was .321.  #20 Hattie Westerfeld lead the team in points scored with 15 kills, 7 aces and 2 stuff blocks.  Right behind her was #5 Macy Prickel with 10 kills and five aces.  #11 Jenna Ertel held down the court defensively with 1/3 of the digs on the night, she had 11 of the 33 team digs.The JV & Varsity teams will travel to Jennings County on Thursday for a 6:00pm JV start time.Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Jody Thomas.last_img read more

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Cross Country State Finals Results

first_imgThe 2019 XC season came to an end Saturday as we cheered on senior Adam Moster and sophomore Lily Pinckley as they competed at the Lavern Gibson Championship Cross Country course in Terre Haute for the State competition. Although we can say the weather was MUCH better than last weekend, it was still a bit chilly and windy. Adam stepped up to the line first at 1pm with 24 other teams and individuals joining him. (214 in all). Adam was among some incredible competition and finished in the top half of the race, right at the 100th spot with a time of 16:54. 45 minutes later, it was Lily’s turn. 205 ladies were ready to start the race when the connon went off. Lily fought all the way through the finish line and placed 63rd with a time of 19:24. Very proud of these two and thank all the teammates and fans that were able to make the trip to Terre Haute to cheer them on. It was an amazing 2019 XC season and I am sad to see it come to an end, but it was exciting yesterday to hear the underclassmen already talk about their goals for next season. Thanks to everyone for all their support throughout the season.Greensburg’s Brenner Hannah was 37th.16531Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Lisa Gausman.last_img read more

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City To Flush Water Mains April 9-10

first_imgBATESVILLE, Ind. – The Batesville Water Utility will be flushing water mains on Thursday, April 9 and Friday, April 10. The flushing can significantly lower the water pressure and cause some fluctuations in water pressure. This sediment can contain iron and manganese and can stain clothing during washing and makes the water unsightly to drink.The purpose of the flushing is to remove sediment from the mains and improve the water quality, which is the Utilities’ primary concern.Questions concerning the flushing or problems experienced during this work should be directed to: During business hours, Eric Laker, Batesville Water Utility, Phone 812-934-3811, before business hours, call 812-212-8532.The flushing schedule is:last_img

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Aguero blow rocks City camp

first_imgManuel Pellegrini prepared for Manchester City’s crunch Champions League clash at Roma by revealing Sergio Aguero could be out for six weeks. But Pellegrini must now try to engineer a positive result without him. His side are level on five points with Roma and CSKA Moscow in a tight battle for the second last-16 qualification spot behind Bayern Munich. To go through City need to win and hope CSKA do not beat Bayern, or get a score draw and hope CSKA lose. A defeat would eliminate them from Europe altogether. It is likely to be a night of high tension in the Italian capital as City look to get what had been, until Aguero’s heroics against Bayern, a disappointing campaign. City had made no secret of their ambition to make their mark in the Champions League this season. A third exit at the group stage in four seasons could therefore raise questions about Pellegrini’s future but the 61-year-old does not feel his job is under threat. He said: “I don’t think so. Tomorrow is a very important game and all of us want to qualify but I don’t think that what happens will have some link about the future in my club. “I have never received any kind of pressure from the club. I hope we are going to qualify but I have nothing to be (concerned) about my future here.” Roma know that they will go through with a victory but anything less would open the door for City or CSKA. Pellegrini said: “I think both clubs have the same pressure. It is a big thing here in Italy, they have spent a lot of money on different players and have a very good squad. I think the pressure for both clubs is exactly the same.” As well as being without Aguero, City are again missing key midfielder Yaya Toure through suspension. The positive news is that playmaker David Silva, out since October with a knee injury, and captain Vincent Kompany, who has missed two games with a hamstring problem, have both trained and could return. Striker Stevan Jovetic, who was rested against Everton as a precaution against a hamstring niggle, could also feature – although Pellegrini was coy when asked about the trio. He said: “All of them could be ready. There is some doubt about one of them but we will see tomorrow.” Pellegrini admitted it has been a troubled group campaign but he is confident of a positive outcome. He said: “Maybe we made a lot of different mistakes in the other games, especially against the Russian team, but we have a chance. “As we demonstrated against Bayern Munich, we will fight to qualify. Tomorrow we will try to do it. I am sure we are going to do it if we play a very good game.” The City boss then insisted his job was not on the line as he looked ahead to the fixture that will determine his side’s immediate European fate without his star striker. Aguero, who has scored 19 goals this season and struck a dramatic hat-trick to keep City alive in Europe against Bayern Munich a fortnight ago, damaged knee ligaments in Saturday’s win over Everton. Press Association His absence will be keenly felt but Pellegrini was keen to take the focus away from the 26-year-old ahead of the decisive Group E contest at the Stadio Olimpico. Pellegrini, speaking at his pre-match press conference, said: “Well, Sergio – we know he is injured. He cannot play tomorrow. “He will see how long he will be out but I think it is more important for us to think about the players we have available for an important game against Roma.” When pressed on how long Aguero could be absent after he was assessed over the weekend, the Chilean said: “We know but it is difficult to know exactly how long he will be injured. “It could maybe be four, five or six weeks. It depends a lot on the way he recovers.” That would certainly rule him out of remaining games this month against Leicester, Crystal Palace, West Brom and Burnley, the New Year’s Day clash with Sunderland and an FA Cup third-round tie against Sheffield Wednesday. Should he be ruled out for six weeks, Aguero would also miss tough games against Everton and Arsenal but he could be back to face title Barclays Premier League rivals Chelsea on January 31. Aguero’s performances have been the key factor in City’s recent return to form with successive wins heading into the Roma clash. last_img read more

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Broadcaster George Hale still behind the microphone at 83

first_img Latest posts by Taylor Vortherms (see all) Bio EHS names new boys’ soccer coach – July 13, 2016 Latest Posts Part 1: Invisible, incapacitating concussions are sidelining high school athletes – July 19, 2016 Part 2: When the injury is inside your head, some “don’t get it” – July 26, 2016 Legendary broadcaster George Hale remains involved in the radio and television industry. PHOTO BY RICK MCHALE Taylor VorthermsSports Editor at The Ellsworth AmericanTaylor Vortherms covers sports in Hancock County. The St. Louis, Missouri native recently graduated from the Missouri School of Journalism and joined The Ellsworth American in 2013. BANGOR — Legendary sportscaster George Hale knew at age 6 what he wanted to be when he grew up.When Hale was a child, his parents would spot him in their front yard, describing the passing cars into a sawed off broomstick. Two decades later, Hale was using a real microphone to broadcast play-by-play action of the University of Maine football games.“Apparently, I was destined to do this,” Hale says.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textHale has done live commentary on more than 3,000 college and high school sporting events for WABI-Bangor. On Thursday night in Boston, the New England chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences — the same academy that distributes Emmys — will recognize Hale with the Gold Circle Award, honoring iconic television professionals in the industry for more than 50 years.Dan Cashman, “The Nite Show” host on WABI-Channel 5, nominated the 83-year-old veteran broadcaster for the award.“He’s a pillar of the broadcast community in Maine,” Cashman says of Hale. “There is no one else here with that kind of track record.”Hale has been on the air for 62 years, and he has no plans of retiring.On a Friday morning, after finishing a show for his George Hale/Ric Tyler weekday talk radio program on WVOM, Hale sips on a cup of iced tea inside Hero’s Sports Grill. A patron of the restaurant, his Maine Sports Hall of Fame trophy sparkles on display behind the bar.When asked how many halls of fame he has been inducted into, Hale shrugs.“I don’t know. Five or six,” he says. “If you live long enough, they give you something.”Hale grew up around sports. The Cleveland native moved to New York City in fourth grade after his father, a marine engineer, got a job working on ships in Staten Island. The pair regularly attended Major League ball games to see the Dodgers, Yankees and Giants.“Sports have always been a huge part of my life,” Hale says. “If I didn’t have sports, I’d be in jail.”Hale always wanted to be a football player — a long shot for a 117-pound boy in a high school of some 2,500 students. He recalls the day his football coach escorted him down the hall to the cross-country coach’s classroom.“‘You’re going to get killed out there,’” the football coach told Hale, who ultimately decided that with his lanky frame, he was better suited to be a runner.After graduation, Hale enlisted in the Navy. He served as a medic at Corpus Christi Naval Air Station in Texas in the early 1950s, treating Marines wounded in the Korean War.To boost morale, Hale collaborated with an electrician and built a radio station to broadcast music, interviews and the daily menu throughout the hospital.“Available for lunch today is… Crap,” Hale would joke on air before dedicating a song to a patient or staff member. “To the blonde nurse in Ward 7 who all the guys are in love with — this song is for you.”“They loved it,” Hale says, grinning. “That’s when I knew I wanted to be a radio announcer.”Hale returned to New York and began attending the School of Radio Technique with instructors who worked at NBC.In addition to school and his student-training at Radio City, Hale kept busy with different side jobs. He worked at a grocery store, a publishing house, the Paramount Theatre as an usher and, on Saturday mornings, the zoo, cleaning monkey cages.Hale’s connections with NBC eventually added some glamour to his life, introducing him to the big shots of that radio era such as Bert Parks and Mike Wallace. Hale says he once bowled with the drummer, Buddy Rich, and even went on a couple dates with some of The Rockettes.“I had hair then,” Hale says. “I was living the Broadway life, and I was going to be a big star in New York.”Hale observed in the 1950s that stardom involved appearing on television — still one of technology’s latest innovations. He expressed interest in becoming a TV broadcaster to NBC’s chief announcer, who told Hale he would need some experience if he ever wanted to break into that scene.Desperate for a shot, Hale learned of a new TV station in a city he’d never heard of before — Bangor, Maine.“They told me it was pretty far north,” Hale says, to which he responded with the question: “Hudson Bay-north?”Not quite Canada-bound, Hale drove his old Chevy some 500 miles to interview for a position at Maine’s first television station — WABI-TV — in 1953. He was hired as a staff announcer for WABI radio with the promise he would eventually get on screen.“I was fascinated with Bangor,” Hale says of his transition from the Big Apple. “I thought there were bears behind every tree.”Hale balanced his radio duties with occasional television work, which consisted exclusively of live commercial breaks for the first year. At the time, everything on TV was shot live in black and white with scripts written on cue cards.Hale chuckles while recalling his first on-air assignment — a commercial for Viner’s Music Company — in which he unknowingly held an album cover upside-down.“In the old days, what you put on the air was what you put on the air,” Hale says. “There was no taking it back.”Hale’s chance at redemption came when he was selected for the Harvard beer commercials. He would pour himself a glass of the beer and hold it up, as if he were about to take a drink. Hale says this lasted about a week until the Women’s Christian Temperance Union arrived at WABI with picket signs, threatening to boycott the station over “that young boy on television selling beer.”George Hale began working for WABI-Bangor in 1953. PHOTO COURTESY OF RICK MCHALE“I was 21, but I looked 16,” Hale says.He mimics his boss’s reaction to the controversy: “‘Good God, can’t you grow a beard?’” he asked Hale before reassigning him to commercials selling public finance loans.Hale planned to stay in Maine for two years and then return to the city. That changed in 1957 when he convinced WABI to start broadcasting University of Maine football games.“All of the sudden, with no great planning or effort, I became ‘the sports guy,’” Hale says.Hale’s roots in Maine deepened when he married a Brewer native and started raising children. He was absorbed in his work, arriving at the station at 5 a.m. and staying until 11 p.m., despite his boss’s pleas for him to leave.Eventually, Hale was traveling regularly across the country to broadcast play-by-play commentary of UMaine football, basketball and baseball games on the radio and television. Sometimes, he traveled by plane. Other times, he caught a ride on the team bus.“The most exciting thing was having the kids invite me out to pizza,” Hale says. “It was the little things that were special.”Most notably, Hale covered seven College World Series in Omaha, Neb., and the 1965 Tangerine Bowl in Orlando — UMaine’s only invitation to a national bowl.In October, UMaine celebrated the 50th anniversary of that Black Bears football team by hosting a reunion for those players. Hale was invited as a surprise guest speaker.“They were all excited I was still alive,” Hale says. “We all remembered each other.”Hale says he called out a few familiar faces during his speech: “Ronnie,” he said, “the campus police are still looking for you.”Hale smiles. “The room just erupted,” he says.Hale also mentored aspiring sports announcers who graduated from UMaine and have since climbed into national prominence, including Bill Patrick of ESPN and the USA Network, Gary Thorne — ESPN’s lead NHL play-by-play announcer — and Steve Martin — the voice of the NBA’s Charlotte Hornets.“George had opportunities to jump into higher markets,” Cashman says. “His loyalty to WABI and Bangor is unparalleled.”Hale still appears on WABI-Channel 5 every Friday night to discuss sports at the professional, college and high school levels.While Hale has become synonymous with Maine sports, he resents the label “sportscaster.” He also worked as a disc jockey and a political reporter, interviewing politicians such as Margaret Chase Smith and Sen. Joseph McCarthy as well as musicians such as Little Richard.“I’m a broadcaster,” Hale says. “I did it all. Back then, you had to.”Cashman, 37, says that, like countless others, he grew up listening to Hale.“People who are twice my age can also say they’ve grown up with George,” Cashman says. “It’s a comforting feeling to turn on the TV and still see him there.”While Hale never became a football player or a star in New York City, he has achieved celebrity status across Maine. He says strangers still stop him on the street, wanting to discuss politics or a high school tournament from decades ago.“You don’t realize how much you touch people,” Hale says. “I still like when people come up and say hello.”Hale is the only Maine media representative who has won the Eastern College Athletic Conference Media Award, and he is the only non-graduate of the University of Maine to receive the Black Bear Award. He has been named Maine’s Sportscaster of the Year multiple times and is in numerous halls of fame, including the Maine Broadcasting Hall of Fame and the New England Basketball Hall of Fame.But fame has not gone to Hale’s head.“I’m really not very talented, I’m just focused,” Hale says. “The only difference between you and me is that I have a microphone.”Hale walks out of the restaurant, appearing unfazed by the stares he attracts. When the door closes behind him, several diners lean in over their tables and whisper:“Was that George Hale?”last_img read more

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Update on the latest sports

first_img April 5, 2020 Bryant and fellow NBA greats Tim Duncan and Kevin Garnett headline a nine-person group announced Saturday of this year’s class of enshrinees into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. They got into the Hall in their first year of eligibility, as did WNBA great Tamika Catchings.Two-time NBA champion coach Rudy Tomjanovich (tahm-JAHN’-oh-vich), longtime Baylor women’s coach Kim Mulkey, 1,000-game winner Barbara Stevens of Bentley and three-time Final Four coach Eddie Sutton were also selected.All eight finalists who were announced in February were chosen to get in by the panel of 24 voters.Former FIBA Secretary General Patrick Baumann is also headed to the Hall. He was selected as a direct-elect by the international committee.INDYCAR-VIRTUAL RACING Update on the latest sports — The Spanish league and players are still far apart on the size of the salary cuts. The league is trying to reduce the financial impact caused by the outbreak, but players say the organization wants them to carry nearly half the total losses. The league and the players’ association have been in talks to try to find ways to mitigate losses that could reach about $1.08 billion if the season cannot be restarted because of the pandemic. Players have said they are willing to reduce their salaries, but not as much as the league or the clubs want.— English Premier League soccer players have rejected a move by clubs to cut their wages by 30% during the coronavirus pandemic. The stance from the union followed talks involving clubs and the leagues. Liverpool and fellow 2019 Champions League finalist Tottenham have announced that some non-playing staff will be furloughed since the competition has been indefinitely suspended.BASKETBALL HALL OF FAMEKobe, Duncan, Garnett headline Basketball Hall of Fame classUNDATED (AP) — Kobe Bryant’s resume has yet another entry to prove his greatness. He’s now officially a Hall of Famer. The White House says the commissioners thanked the president for his “national leadership and for his interest in the sports industry.” He called on them to continue efforts to support their fellow Americans during the current challenge. A wide range of sports league officials participated in the call, including NFL commissioner Roger Goodell and NBA commissioner Adam Silver.None of the leagues released public comment about the call.A person with direct knowledge of what was discussed on the call said Trump believes the NFL season will start on time on Sept. 10 with fans in seats.In other news related to the coronavirus pandemic:— The president is reassuring Little League baseball players that they should be playing the game again soon. Little League president and CEO Stephen Keener reassured that the players would be back soon. Little League has suspended activities until mid-May, when the situation will be assessed, according to its website. OBIT-HONDURAS-CALLEJASEx-Honduran leader caught in FIFA scandal dies in U.S.MEXICO CITY (AP) — A former president of Honduras convicted in the FIFA soccer bribery scandal has died in the United States. Rafael Callejas governed Honduras from 1990 to 1994, but he was better known for soliciting hundreds of thousands of dollars in bribes in the wide-ranging FIFA soccer scandal over lucrative broadcast rights. The 76-year-old Callejas pleaded guilty in 2016 and was reportedly being held at a prison in Atlanta when he died Saturday.He pleaded guilty to racketeering conspiracy and wire fraud conspiracy in a New York federal court. He said he distributed a significant portion of his bribes to delegates of the Honduran soccer federation so he could remain its president, a position he held from 2002 to last August.,Tampa Bay Lightning advance to face Dallas Stars in Stanley Cup finals, beating New York Islanders 2-1 in OT in Game 6center_img Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditVIRUS OUTBREAK-SPORTSPresident lauds sports leagues, players in handling of coronavirusUNDATED (AP) — The White House says the president spoke with commissioners of the country’s sports leagues in a conference call Saturday and told them he recognizes “the good work being done by many teams and players” to care for their communities and fans dealing with the new coronavirus. McLaughlin wins virtual IndyCar event racing from AustraliaUNDATED (AP) — Australian V8 SuperCars champion Scott McLaughlin has won IndyCar’s second virtual race.McLaughlin and NASCAR’s seven-time champion Jimmie Johnson were invited guests by IndyCar to participate in the iRacing Series meant to entertain fans during the stoppage due to the coronavirus. He beat Team Penske teammate and fellow Aussie Will Power in Saturday’s race from virtual Barber Motorsports Park in Alabama.McLaughlin was scheduled to make his IndyCar debut for Team Penske on the road course at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in May before the race was postponed because of the coronavirus outbreak.NHL-RANGERS-RACIST HACKER Hacker posts racial slur on fan chat with black NHL playerNEW YORK (AP) — A hacker posted a racial slur hundreds of times in an online fan video chat Friday with a black New York Rangers prospect.The NHL team scrambled to disable the hacker on the Zoom chat with K’Andre Miller, the 20-year-old former Wisconsin defenseman drafted No. 22 overall in 2018. The hacker repeatedly posted the one-word slur in all capital letters on the Rangers’ “Future Fridays” series on Twitter.The Rangers said in a statement that “a vile individual hijacked the chat to post racial slurs, which we disabled as soon as possible.” The team said it is investigating the matter.The NHL also released a statement condemning the hack, saying “No one deserves to be subjected to such ugly treatment and it will not be tolerated in our league.” Associated Press last_img read more

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Blum: Syracuse’s use of freshmen against URI lacked long-term vision

first_img Published on September 10, 2015 at 10:45 pm Tyrone Perkins ran to his left after quarterback Austin Wilson took the snap, collected the hand off and sprinted 5 yards through the middle of Rhode Island’s paltry defense.It was the first play for Perkins in his SU career. A meaningless, fourth-quarter rush that’s main purpose was to kill clock at the tail end of a 47-0 win.Syracuse played 15 freshmen — 56 percent of the total class — in its season-opening win, tied for the third most of any Division I team. In head coach Scott Shafer’s first two years as head coach, the Orange has used just 10 percent and 32 percent of its redshirts in the season’s first game, respectively.If even some goes to plan for Syracuse, Perkins might not see the field again in 2015, and almost certainly never for a meaningful snap. Neither will Kenterius Womack — a QB-turned-wide receiver — who didn’t touch the ball, but played on Friday. And neither will safety Daivon Ellison or defensive tackle Anthony Giudice.The focus in personnel usage comes with a difference in Syracuse’s priority. It’s a win-now mentality for a young Orange team that has its potential offensive and defensive stars nearly all coming up at the same time.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIt’s a mindset based in long-term reasoning, but lacks long-term logic.“Here’s the bottom line. If that guy ends up being a starter next year, I don’t want his very first snap to be when he’s a starter,” offensive coordinator Tim Lester said, speaking generally. “You’re just trying to get guys ready to go as quickly as possible.”Lester and the coaching staff want their players to be ready when the bell rings for meaningful snaps. But it’s a catch-22. Using the athletes they see as part of their future, also, in a way, limits their future.Shafer acknowledged on Thursday that he couldn’t really see any of the true freshmen that weren’t on the two-deep depth chart playing a sizable role for Syracuse this season. So why, then, use a full year of eligibility on them now, when they won’t play an impactful role?Though it potentially limits the depth of the roster in the short-term, redshirting will give athletes the chance to have more important snaps in their fifth year on the team.“A lot of people take it as ‘Man, I’m not good enough,’ said true freshman Jacob Hill, who played on Friday. “You’re young and you’re inexperienced. But mental reps is just as good as physical reps.”Of course it makes sense to put Eric Dungey in the game. He’s the new starting quarterback. Jordan Fredericks appears ready to contribute as a running back. Even Matt Keller is on scholarship to be the long snapper from day 1.When Shafer justifies his use of freshmen with a win-now mindset, it should be in the context of those that can contribute. Lester said that the coaching staff would have no regrets with their process, even if a player like Womack doesn’t step on the field the rest of 2015.Syracuse is a team invested in its young talent. Eighteen players on the two-deep depth chart are in their first or second year. With youth, of course, comes uncertainty. And the promotion of a meritocracy, one where unproven talent continues to push each other, is sensible.But at the risk of potentially erasing a player’s best year — SU has four redshirt seniors slated to start on Saturday — limits what the player can bring to the table in a long-term sense. Of SU’s two-deep, 54 percent of them have redshirted a season. The benefit of patience is sprinkled throughout the roster.“Well we’re just trying to win right here and right now,” Shafer said. “And that’s our focus. And regardless of what year a young man’s in, we’ll play the best players that have been the right to be on the field.“It’s really just as simple as that.”Sam Blum is the sports editor at The Daily Orange, where his column appears occasionally. He can be reached at sblum@syr.edu or on Twitter at @SamBlum3. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Syracuse scores twice early to beat Cornell, 2-0

first_imgIn the eighth minute of Syracuse’s matchup with Cornell, it found the separation that eluded it three days prior against No. 12 Notre Dame. A string of passes and turnovers ended with the ball at Ryan Raposo’s feet. The freshman darted his eyes towards Cornell’s goalie, Ryan Shellow. The Big Red stalwart was flat-footed and Raposo noticed. Raposo wound his right leg back, sending the ball curling towards the top-right corner, past Shellow’s out-stretched hand. On a rain-soaked field that temporarily knocked out the scoreboard at Charles F. Berman Field, Raposo’s strike served as a catalyst for the Orange offense. It kick-started a 13-minute stretch that proved the difference in Syracuse’s (3-2, 0-1 Atlantic Coast) 2-0 victory over Cornell (3-1) in Ithaca. “We started the game well,” Syracuse head coach Ian McIntyre said. “We’re up 2-0 on the road in the first 12 minutes. That was awesome.”The early firepower further demonstrated SU’s offensive ability. The Orange played without its point leader, Tajon Buchanan, who suffered a knee injury this past Friday. And it didn’t matter. SU still scored multiple goals. It was the third-straight game it did so. On Monday night, Cornell was its latest victim. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textFour minutes after Raposo’s goal, SU kept up the pressure. It extended possessions by creating turnovers in the midfield. In the 12th minute, Hugo Delhommelle, the designated set piece taker, whipped a ball into a thicket of bodies. Grad-transfer Len Zeugner rose and angled his head perpendicular to the ground. His header bounced into the back post, doubling the Orange lead. After the initial flurry, Syracuse’s offense “took its foot off the gas,” McIntyre said. The Big Red wrestled back control of the match by executing short passes. McIntyre said the rain acted as an “equalizer,” preventing the Orange from controlling possession. Jonathan Hagman, Massimo Ferrin, and Delhommelle rushed at Cornell forwards, taking away vertical passing options. Yet the home team generated scoring chances and took advantage of poor positioning by SU’s backline. In the 21st minute, Kamal Miller was left on an island and chased a striker down the right side of the Orange defense. The scrum led to a free kick just outside the penalty area. It gave Cornell a set piece, something Syracuse failed to handle in its most recent loss against Notre Dame. The initial shot was deflected, but Caleb McAuslan was left alone in the box and had a point-blank attempt at SU goalie Hendrik Hilpert. McAuslan’s shot flew wide, drawing a gasp from the Cornell faithful. “We lacked a little bit of quality in the second half,” McIntyre said. “We were absorbing a lot of pressure. They were throwing everything at us, they had nothing to lose.”SU spent the remainder of the match on its heels, dealing with eight Cornell shots and more scoring opportunities. Yet the shutout was maintained. A doorstep shot was cleared away by a Syracuse defender. Hilpert was late on a clearance, gifting Cornell a scoring chance. The Big Red pushed a ball over the line in the 55th minute, but it was disallowed due to an offsides call. After the game, Syracuse dried off and celebrated with music on the team bus. The first shutout of the year wasn’t the easiest, but it got SU above .500 ahead of its matchup against Clemson on Friday night. “The guys realized the challenge here,” McIntyre said. “It was a combative, physical game. We found a way.” Facebook Twitter Google+ Commentscenter_img Published on September 10, 2018 at 9:59 pm Contact Nick: nialvare@syr.edu | @nick_a_alvarezlast_img read more

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NTDL fixtures

first_imgToday’s Premier Division fixtures are: Roscrea Town v Ballymackey 11.30amNenagh Celtic v Borrisokane 2.00pmLough Derg    v Cloughjordan 11.30amSallypark    v Thurles Town 12.00pmlast_img

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