CBI files FIR on mills sale

first_imgThe Central Bureau of Investigation has registered an FIR to probe alleged irregularities in the sale of 21 State-owned sugar mills during the tenure of former Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Mayawati in 2010-11, resulting in a loss of ₹1,179 crore to the exchequer.The case, in which seven persons have been named as accused for using forged documents while purchasing the mills from the U.P. State Sugar Corporation Limited, has been lodged on a reference from the Yogi Adityanath government. Six preliminary enquiries have also been initiated into the allegations.Probe soughtThe State government had sought a CBI probe into the sale of 21 mills and alleged graft in the purchase of seven closed mills in Deoria, Bareilly, Laxmi Ganj, Hardoi, Ramkola, Chittauni and Barabanki. It was also being pursued by the Lucknow Police.last_img read more

JeM terrorist arrested in J&K’s Baramulla district

first_imgA Jaish-e-Mohammad (JeM) terrorist was arrested in Baramulla district of north Kashmir on Sunday, a police spokesperson said. Mohsin Manzoor Salhea, a resident of Arampora-Azadgunj area, was arrested on a credible input during an anti-militant operation in Baramulla town, he said. According to the spokesperson, Salhea was affiliated with proscribed terror outfit JeM and was wanted in two cases registered at the Baramulla police station this year. Salhea was part of a group involved in planning and executing terror attacks in the area, he said. Incriminating material, including arms and ammunition, were recovered from his possession, the spokesperson said.last_img

Delhi University to extend sports quota reservation in PG courses

first_imgDelhi University (DU ) has now introduced a five per cent quota in post-graduate courses under sports category to encourage more and more students to take up sports and yet continue with higher academic education, reported Mail Today.The University only permitted admission under sports quota for Bachelor’s degrees till last year but now the facility has been extended for postgraduate courses.This way the students’ achievements till undergraduate level are not wasted. Head of Sports Council S. Dubey said that the decision to reserve five per cent seats in every course for acclaimed and certified performers in sports was taken so that more students get encouraged to pursue sports.Not only this, some students will also get direct admission under the sports quota. Officials said that students who have won accolades at national- and international-level sports competition will not be required to give trials for the admission under the quota.DU last year eased admissions under sports quota especially for chess players, shooters and archers, who will now have to undertake only one of the three fitness tests to qualify for trials.DU will start the process for admission to its under-graduate courses for academic year 2014-15 on June 2. The university has made many alterations in its admission process for academic year 2014-15.last_img read more

9 months agoLaLiga president Tebas: Morata to Atletico? Real Madrid and Neymar?

first_imgLaLiga president Tebas: Morata to Atletico? Real Madrid and Neymar?by Carlos Volcano9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLaLiga president Javier Tebas has questioned whether Atletico Madrid can sign Chelsea striker Alvaro Morata.Tebas believes Atletico’s budget won’t stretch to cover Morata’s demands.He told AS: “They’re very limited; they would have to get rid of someone. I do not know exactly because that is what is needed for the economic controls.”Tebas was also asked about Real Madrid buying PSG star Kylian Mbappe or Neymar.He added: “Either one of the two. Or the two. I do not know if Florentino (Perez) wants to sign one of the two. We have worked hard on the brand and it is above the players because we have taken advantage of the synergy of the clubs. “What we do not know is how much more we would be favoured by them being here.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Photo: El Paso Newspaper Mistakenly Calls Washington State “Huskies”

first_imgWashington State mistakenly called the Huskies in newspaper article.Wazzu HuskiesWashington State capped off a bounce-back season with a 20-14 win over Miami in the Sun Bowl on Saturday. Apparently, however, the win wasn’t enough to earn respect from the local media. This morning’s El Paso Times headline about the game featured a colossal error: it referred to Wazzu as the “Huskies” instead of the Cougars.Take a step forward if you can report the correct team names in your local bowl. Not so fast @elpasotimes #gocougs pic.twitter.com/YLZ6LalYZM— Jeff (@saomonella) December 27, 2015Of course, the Huskies are Washington, Wazzu’s top rival. So not only did Washington win the Apple Cup over the Cougars by 35 points, they stole a newspaper headline from them.Ouch.[ CougCenter.com ]last_img

Video: Here Is Your First Look At Cardale Jones In A Full Buffalo Bills Uniform

first_imgA closeup of Cardale Jones warming up for an Ohio State football game.COLUMBUS, OH – SEPTEMBER 19: Quarterback Cardale Jones #12 of the Ohio State Buckeyes warms up before the game against the Northern Illinois Huskies at Ohio Stadium on September 19, 2015 in Columbus, Ohio. (Photo by Andrew Weber/Getty Images)Today is the NFLPA Rookie Premiere, which gives fans the opportunity to see recent draftees in their new uniforms for the first time ever.Here’s a look at former Ohio State quarterback Cardale Jones, a fourth-round selection of the Buffalo Bills. The Bills haven’t had a long-term solution at quarterback since the Jim Kelly era. It may take Jones some time to acclimate himself to the professional level, but Rex Ryan and company are hoping he can eventually prove himself worthy of being a starter.last_img

Diamond mine hit by second Attawapiskat blockade

first_img(John Edwards speaks to a supporter at Attawapiskat blockade of ice road leading to De Beers diamond mine. APTN/Photo)By Jorge Barrera APTN National News ATTAWAPISKAT-About a dozen Attawapiskat residents launched a second blockade on an ice road leading to a De Beers diamond mine Sunday.The blockade, which began Sunday evening, forced a convoy of several empty fuel trucks back to the De Beers Victor diamond mine which sits about 90 kilometres west of Attawapiskat in northern Ontario.A separate blockade ended Thursday.A cube truck, several pick-up trucks and wooden pallets blocked the branch of the ice road leading to the De Beers mine. The diamond mining giant depends on the ice road to haul things like fuel and equipment too heavy for easy air delivery.“We just want to be heard,” said John Edwards, one of about a dozen people at the blockade late Sunday evening. “Attawapiskat is idle no more.”Edwards said part of the blockade was motivated by De Beers’ failure to compensate his family for the impact the mine has had on their traplines. The mine is also next to where his grandmother is buried.“They never gave…anything to date for trespassing on the trapline,” said Edwards.He said it was time for De Beers to compensate Attawapiskat residents for the wealth the mine generates.“This is traditional territory for us. We use the rivers as highways, we travel on them to hunt, to get access to other rivers,” said Edwards. “It comes down to money. It is a money system that was introduced ever since the foreign immigrants came here. The immigrants came here, the king and queen system didn’t work for them, the peasants came over, and they got rich on these lands.”This blockade comes three days after another blockade on the same ice road ended peacefully after De Beers, Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence came to an agreement with another group of residents who demanded that the community’s impact benefit agreement with mining giant be reopened.Bruce Shisheesh, the spokesman for the first group, said it was his understanding the agreement has now been reopened. In a statement issued by De Beers following the end of last week’s blockade, the mining company made no mention of reopening the agreement.Spence was not in the community at the time the blockade was launched. The Attawapiskat chief is in Moose Factory for meetings.De Beers could not be reached for comment.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

Columbus Crew draw English Premier League team Crystal Palace FC

The Columbus Crew hosted English Premier League team Crystal Palace F.C. in an international friendly at Crew Stadium Wednesday and a game with unlimited substitutions resulted in a 2-2 draw between the American and British sides.Forward Adam Bedell drew first blood for the Black and Gold on an arching assist by defender Eric Gehrig in the 15th minute, but the opposition was not deterred as Palace’s Glenn Murray equalized with a 36th minute strike.The final 10 minutes of the first half saw the visiting Eagles engage a tighter defensive stance of contesting for possession, likely inspired to battle after their forward evened the game for them.“From the start, they sat back a little bit. That’s just the way that they, that’s just their game plan,” Bedell said after the game, speaking to what the Premier League squad did differently from the Major League Soccer defenses the Crew face every week. “A good block of eight, good defending … MLS teams, when the game’s 0-0, you just play. You don’t see that, that block of eight very often so I think that was the big difference.”Another Crystal Palace goal by substitute midfielder Jake Gray in the 70th minute of play occurred following a scuffle in the box, during which Crew goalkeeper Matt Lampson pled his case for having been interfered with on the play. The goal stood to give the guests the 2-1 lead after they had been threatening in transition for the majority of the evening.One of the Crew’s three defensive halftime substitutions saw a homegrown player from Bexley, Ohio, in Ross Friedman get his first career action in a Black and Gold kit when he came in for fellow defender Chad Barson.Friedman, 22, had been playing for the USL-PRO affiliate Dayton Dutch Lions but got the call to suit up as a Crew reserve against a top-flight international team.“I think going out at Dayton and trying to do the little things right — not slacking in any way — you know, prepares me for situations like this,” Friedman said. “This opportunity proves to show we can get called at any point. Situations happen and you’ve got to be ready. So I felt happy with my preparation and I’m ready to build off of it.”Columbus notched an 80th minute goal, however, to tie the game once more.Crew center midfielder Agustin Viana delivered a lofting assist from 35 yards away and his attacking counterpart, Daniel Paladini, fought to contact the ball in midair for the equalizing header. The tie game endured through two minutes of second-half stoppage time.“Adam (Bedell) was fantastic. He had a great header and Danny (Paladini) made a nice run trying to get midfielders running into the box. I was pleased over all,” Crew coach Gregg Berhalter said.Berhalter, who played as a defender for Crystal Palace from 2001-02, added that “the defending could have been a bit better.”The game marked the first of three stops on Crystal Palace’s American tour before the Premier League season kicks off in August.The Crew are slated to resume MLS play when they travel to Foxboro, Mass., to take on the New England Revolution in a crucial Eastern Conference matchup Saturday.Kickoff is slated for 7:30 p.m. read more

Rep Roberts sponsors resolution to reduce regulation of portable gas cans

first_img Categories: Roberts News 26Apr Rep. Roberts sponsors resolution to reduce regulation of portable gas cans Resolution encourages Congress to repeal EPA standards for designState Rep. Brett Roberts shows the House Natural Resources Committee the changes made to the design of portable fuel containers because of EPA standards adopted in 2009.State Rep. Brett Roberts spoke before the House Natural Resources Committee today in support of a resolution he introduced to stop the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from overregulating the design of portable gas cans.In an effort to reduce evaporation from portable fuel containers, the EPA has required containers manufactured since 2009 to feature a permeation barrier and new spouts that close automatically.“The problem is the EPA’s regulations do more harm than good,” Roberts said. “The new containers aren’t effective because they don’t have vents, which creates a slow, uneven flow of fuel that frustrates users. Additionally, the new rigid spout designs don’t allow for easily filling gas tanks such as those in vehicles and lawnmowers.”Roberts’ resolution urges Congress to repeal the standards set forth by the EPA.“The EPA adopted these regulations without properly accounting for the real-life application of the changes,” Roberts said. “It’s time to do away with the changes.”The Natural Resources Committee overwhelmingly approved the resolution. It now moves to the full House for consideration.###last_img read more

IT magnate and The Apprentice star Lord Sugar has

first_imgIT magnate and The Apprentice star Lord Sugar has stepped down from his role as non-executive chairman at UK connected TV platform YouView.Sugar, founder of pioneering electronics brand Amstrad, will step down from his position at the broadcaster-backed IPTV service over the next few weeks, with a replacement chairman to be announced in due course.He was first drafted in to replacement Kip Meek, who had resigned from the joint venture platform following a series of pre-launch hitches in 2011. The platform – which is backed by the BBC, ITV, Channel 4, Channel 5, telco TalkTalk and television infrastructure firm Arqiva – finally went on sale last summer.“When I joined YouView in 2011, my brief from the shareholders was to use my experience in the electronics industry to get the product to market and into the homes of consumers. Having done that successfully, my job is complete and I will now focus my time and attention into my other businesses.“I’d like to thank all those who are part of the YouView project, including its suppliers, staff and shareholders and I wish them every success for the future,” said Sugar.last_img read more

The BBC has launched its first multiplayer online

first_imgThe BBC has launched its first multiplayer online game in beta to get feedback from users ahead of a full launch.The game, Nightfall, is targeted at 8-13 year-olds.The game begins when the players fall asleep, challenging young people and their friends to take on the role of Nightfallers – guardians of light fighting against darkness, and battling to banish every last nightmare from the dream world.Once in the Nightfall dream world, players can take part in solo play while they find their feet and build their skills, but to make progress in the game, they need to work together to stand against the tougher ‘Nightmare’ challenges, according to the BBC.The broadcasters already offers a range of games on CBeebies and CBBC online and in its children’s apps, intended to enable younger audiences to interact and play with their favourite BBC programmes and characters“To date, those games have served great purpose in bringing our show brands to the ‘gamers’ in our audience. Building on that success, Nightfall is an exploration of how gaming is evolving as an entertainment format for younger audiences. Young players are becoming savvier than ever before and in response to this shift, one of our key focus points has been around the format of gaming itself. We want to talk to the audience in the most genuine language possible, a language, which now is for many, a native one,” said Will Storer, senior product manager, design and engineering, in a blog post.Storer said that Nightfall was intended to combine elements of gaming that felt genuine to the gaming audience with the BBC’s mission to inform, educate and entertain.The game includes social elements like Emojis, but in an environment that is designed to be safe. Unlike other BBC games, Nightfall is not linked to a single programme or character but is able to integrate a range of other BBC brands.The beta trial will see a limited audience group playing the game, and players will be able to sign up to play via the existing BBC iD system.last_img read more

Mark Zuckerberg Gives a Lesson in How Not to Lead in a

first_img Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Facebook 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List Next Article Guest Writer April 3, 2018 Image credit: NurPhoto | Getty Images Add to Queue Zuckerberg is renowned for inventing Facebook, but his reputation for leading it is in tatters. Samuel Edwards Mark Zuckerberg Gives a Lesson in How Not to Lead in a Crisis 5 min read Digital Marketing Strategist –shares Apply Now » The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. For a while, Facebook could do no wrong. All you have to do is take a quick look at the Facebook stock chart and you’ll see a company that has watched its value rise nearly 500 percent over the past five years alone. But that same chart will also show you a hefty decline since the middle of March. In all honesty, CEO Mark Zuckerberg is to blame. Cambridge Analytica exposed Zuckerberg’s greatest flaw.It would be safe to say that public trust in Facebook is at an all-time low. If the past year has taught us anything, it’s that trust must be continually cultivated, no matter how much of it you think your organization has.Perhaps it was an inflated sense of public trust, an attitude of invincibility, or an unwillingness to own up to responsibility that led Zuckerberg, COO Sheryl Sandberg and other Facebook executives to take a painfully long time to formulate a response to the news that data firm Cambridge Analytica gained access to millions of its users’ data three years ago. However, at this point, does it really matter? The problem is that Facebook is developing a poor track record of managing crises.Now that people know just how much of their personal data Facebook has, the last thing the company can afford is for people to view the social network giant as being irresponsible. Unfortunately, Zuckerberg’s response in the wake of this crisis has done little to instill confidence and accountability.Zuckerberg and the company must decide whether they’re going to embrace the responsibility they have. They’ve walked into this mess by amassing mounds of personal information on users. If they don’t want to deal with the responsibility that comes with it, they need to step out of the way. That’s the blunt truth.To Zuckerberg’s credit, he finally spoke up. “I’ve been working to understand exactly what happened and how to make sure this doesn’t happen again,” Zuckerberg wrote in a post on his profile. “I promise you we’ll work through this and build a better service over the long term.”Zuckerberg’s response was, arguably, another poor PR move. He said no more than you’d expect but far later than he should have. Plus, it was sterile and vague. He left many wondering if Facebook is really doing enough to protect user data.Related: Read Mark Zuckerberg’s Full Statement on Facebook’s Data ScandalTakeaways from Facebook’s PR debacle.Taking your personal feelings and data out of the equation, the Facebook-Cambridge Analytica crisis has been a textbook PR case study in what not to do. As we look at it in more detail, here are a few of the takeaways and lessons business owners and entrepreneurs should spend some time studying.1. Don’t delay.The issue most people had with Facebook’s response was that it took so long for one to be formulated and publicized. Since the company obviously was aware of what was going on, it was unacceptable and disingenuous to keep people waiting for days.One of the first rules of good crisis management is to get ahead of the problem. The sooner you can address the issue, the better you can shape the public narrative and response.Related: Read the Controversial 2016 Facebook Memo in Which an Exec Argues for ‘Growth at Any Cost’2. Apologize.Zuckerberg’s eventual response was 936 words long. While it contained a bunch of corporate language and legal jargon, do you know what word was completely missing? The simple word sorry.It’s not always necessary to spend a bunch of time apologizing in the wake of a crisis, but you do need to say sorry — even if the incident was largely outside your control. It humanizes your brand and makes you look like you care.Related: Mark Zuckerberg Doesn’t Seem Very Sorry or Very Forgiven3. Act.The final lesson is to take action. If you say you’re going to do something, make sure your actions follow your speech. While it remains to be seen if Facebook will maintain a stiffer posture on responsibly stewarding user data, there has been some initial activity.Zuckerberg recently posted to his Facebook page that new privacy and security settings have been placed at the top of everyone’s Newsfeed so that users can easily disable apps they are no longer using and tweak their security settings to fit their preferences. If nothing else, it’s a start.Related: Facebook’s Data Scandal and Europe’s New Data Privacy Rule Have Massive Implications for U.S. EntrepreneursFor Zuckerberg and Facebook, the good news is there will be plenty of opportunities to rebuild trust with users. However, if they’re going to restore that trust, they must learn from their mistakes and make it a point to improve their crisis management efforts and address the PR shortcomings they’ve repeatedly been characterized by. As an outsider looking in, you can also learn from their mistakes and prepare your own business for handling crises with more grace.last_img read more

Richard Branson Says the 95 Workday Grind Is About to Die Heres

first_img Richard Branson Says the 9-5 Workday Grind Is About to Die. Here’s Why. –shares 2 min read Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Nina Zipkin Register Now » Image credit: Axelle/Bauer-Griffin | Getty Images December 19, 2018 Richard Branson believes the 5-day, 9-5 work week will eventually become extinct.In a recent blog post, the Virgin Group founder cited a familiar argument, that technological innovation — especially advances that do away with the need for people to operate everything from factory machinery to cars and planes — will change work as we know it.But he writes that this doesn’t necessarily have to be something to fear. Instead it can be an opportunity to shake things up for the better, and to accelerate the creation of smarter working practices for everyone.Related: Advice for Elon Musk From Richard Branson, Arianna Huffington and Mark Cuban“One useful idea is for governments to provide tuition for workers to gain the technical skills needed in the new marketplace, in exchange for public service. We need more creative solutions too,” Branson explains.Two other ideas that Branson supports are the proliferation of three and four day weekends and job sharing. These would prioritize a work infrastructure that allows employees to have full lives outside of an office, to spend time with friends and family, to  devote time to the things they are passionate about, and to focus on being physically and mentally healthy.Branson explained how flexible work is a big part of how he leads Virgin Group. “If you trust people and treat them as adults, they will repay you by working effectively and efficiently,” he wrote. “Choice can empower people to make good decisions and feel positive about their workplace, helping to keep great employees and attract new talent. If we all work smarter, we won’t have to work longer.”center_img Work-Life Balance Add to Queue The Virgin Group founder urges businesses to implement flexible work practices to get the most from their employees. Staff Writer. Covers leadership, media, technology and culture. Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Next Article Entrepreneur Stafflast_img read more

Well That Was Fast One Survey Says Pokémon Go Has Already Peaked

first_img Register Now » Pokémon Next Article Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Image credit: Nintendo Well, That Was Fast: One Survey Says Pokémon Go Has Already Peaked in the U.S. July 25, 2016 Add to Queuecenter_img –shares This story originally appeared on PCMag How the mighty fall. Yes, Pokémon Go is a big deal now. Yes, it had a great first week in Apple’s App Store: better than any other app ever released. Yes, lots of people play the game and, yes, you’ve probably been tempted to play the game too — even if you managed to fight off the initial buzz.If you’re still scoffing at those who spend hours each night trudging around parks for elusive digital creatures, then you’ll probably take a little solace in a recent report from SurveyMonkey that suggests interest in the game is already starting to wane. We wouldn’t say that’s an unnatural surprise, though. The very nature of Pokémon Go means that any time its servers go down and players can’t play — and there’s been some downtime — the social aspects are wrecked. Gatherings of hundreds (and thousands) of players have been ruined by abrupt server issues, and people can lose interest in a game fairly quickly if they can never seem to play it when they want to. And there’s not very much to do in Pokémon Go besides collecting Pokémon and fighting other players for gym ownership. It’s fun, certainly, but it can get monotonous for some early players.According to Survey Monkey, Pokémon Go had the most daily active users on July 14, just over one week after the game’s release. SurveyMonkey estimates that figure at right around 25 million users or so. Since then, the game’s daily user count has been on the decline.”Surprisingly, downloads of Pokémon Go were largest on the day it was released, July 7th. Most successful apps, including previous record-setting hit games Draw Something and Candy Crush Saga, experience a slow start. These games hit their daily-download peaks some months after initial release. Pokémon Go is unusual not just for the size of its success but also the incredible speed of its ascent up the download charts,” SurveyMonkey notes.These same download charts reveal that the game might be reaching a saturation point in the United States, as it sat at right around 1.5 million daily downloads or so as of July 20. That’s quite a drop from a week prior, where it was close to six million downloads in a single day.It does feel a bit like we’re quibbling over the natural progression of a game, however. Not everyone stays addicted to a mobile game, nor do games typically retain huge download figures for weeks following their launch. At some point, the craze subsides a bit — at least until the game’s developer releases a big update, fixes its servers to allow more people to play or pushes some huge marketing plan (like Pokémon Go’s real-world tie-ins).Pokémon Go is still a pretty big phenomenon, especially when you factor in the popularity of its international launches, too. We doubt it’s going anywhere soon, but the craze does seem to be dropping from feverish proportions in the United States — at least, a little. 3 min read David Murphy Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel.last_img read more

Like clockwork How daylight saving time stumps hospital record keeping

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 5 2018Modern technology has helped medical professionals do robot-assisted surgeries and sequence whole genomes, but hospital software still can’t handle daylight saving time.One of the most popular electronic health records software systems used by hospitals, Epic Systems, can delete records or require cumbersome workarounds when clocks are set back for an hour, prompting many hospitals to opt for paper records for part of the night shift.And it happens every year.”It’s mind-boggling,” said Dr. Mark Friedberg, a senior physician policy researcher at RAND, adding that in 2018, “we expect electronics to handle something as simple as a time change. “Nobody is surprised by daylight savings time. They have years to prep. Only, surprise, it hasn’t been fixed.”Dr. Steven Stack, a past president of the American Medical Association, called the glitches “perplexing” and “unacceptable,” considering that hospitals spend millions of dollars on these systems, and Apple and Google seem to have dealt with seasonal time changes long ago. Epic was founded in 1979, but some hospitals have used these electronic systems longer than others.Carol Hawthorne-Johnson, an ICU nurse in California, said her hospital doesn’t shut down the Epic system during the fall time change. But she’s come to expect that the vitals she enters into the system from 1 a.m. to 2 a.m. will be deleted when the clock falls back to 1 a.m. One hour’s worth of electronic record-keeping “is gone,” she said.Hospital staff have learned to deal with it by taking extra chart notes by hand, but it’s still a burden, she said, especially if vitals change, or a patient needs something like a blood transfusion.Although hospitals often avoid the software glitches by turning the software off and switching to paper charts, it’s far from ideal because hospitals have evolved to become increasingly reliant on electronic systems, said Stack, an emergency physician in Kentucky.”When [electronic medical records] work, it’s wonderful,” he said, but when the system is turned off, doctors can’t use it to access patient records or order tests. Whiteboards are a thing of the past, and some staff members aren’t as comfortable with paper records because they’ve relied on electronic records their entire careers.”It’s an hour where you’re flying sort of blind,” Friedberg said.The one-hour pause slows everything down, which can cause patients to spend more time in emergency department waiting rooms, prompting some to go home before seeing a health care provider. That’s dangerous, Stack said.Not all hospitals turn Epic off, however. At Johns Hopkins Hospital, providers who need to check patients periodically through the night use a workaround. They enter vitals at 1 a.m. and then when the clock falls back an hour later and they have to enter new vitals, they list them at 1:01 a.m. They leave a note that it’s an hour later, not a minute later. That’s how the Cleveland Clinic does it, too.Related Stories’Traffic light’ food labels associated with reduction in calories purchased by hospital employeesIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new studyHome-based support network helps stroke patients adjust after hospital discharge”I don’t disagree with the sentiment that we would like health IT systems to be much more sophisticated,” said Dr. Peter Greene, Johns Hopkins chief medical information officer. But there are plenty of other problems he’d like to see fixed first. “This particular aspect is not one that has caused us a lot of trouble.”Other electronic medical records systems may require similar workarounds, said Jennifer Carpenter, vice president of IT clinical systems at University Hospitals in Cleveland, which uses several electronic medical records systems. Cerner, another major electronic medical records company, was unavailable for comment, but many hospitals plan for Cerner to be down during the time change, too.When asked to comment on the glitches and workarounds, Epic spokeswoman Meghan Roh provided the following statement:”Daylight savings time is inherently nuanced for healthcare organizations, which is why we work closely with customers to provide guidance on how to most effectively use their system to care for their patients during this time period. We’re constantly making improvements and looking for opportunities to enhance the system.”But Friedberg pointed out that hospitals are locked into their electronic medical record systems because they’ve invested so much money in them. And it would cost even more to convert and transfer the records into a new system. As a result, there’s little incentive for software companies to improve their products, he said.”I shudder to think … what does it do with leap years?” Friedberg wondered. This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente.last_img read more

Researchers reveal how some cancers trick healthy cells into protecting tumors

first_img Source:https://www.chla.org/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 30 2018Many factors affect cancer treatment outcome, such as the size and location of the tumor, availability of effective treatments, and timing of intervention. But some cancers are so aggressive that outcome is poor, even after early diagnosis and chemotherapy. Researchers have focused their attention on trying to understand what makes some cancers less treatable than others. Now, researchers at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles reveal a mechanism by which some cancers trick healthy cells into protecting tumors.Yves DeClerck, MD, of the Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases and the Saban Research Institute at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, has dedicated his career to understanding how cancer cells interact with the surrounding normal tissue to escape the effects of therapy. Research has shown that tumors with high levels of a protein called Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) are more aggressive and are associated with poorer outcomes. In the new study, published November 20th in the journal Cell Reports, DeClerck’s team demonstrated that cancer cells use PAI-1 to trick the body’s immune system into supporting the cancer.DeClerck and his team, led by postdoctoral research fellow Marta Kubala, PhD, characterized a relationship between tumors and the immune system. “In this study, we focused on the role of immune cells called macrophages and how PAI-1 affects their activity,” explains Kubala. As important players in the immune system, macrophages find and destroy cancer cells or foreign invaders like bacteria. While macrophages are normally considered anti-cancer, DeClerck’s team showed that PAI-1 pushes macrophages into an alternate, pro-cancer state (called M2) by recruiting common players in the immune system – IL-6 and STAT3 – effectively signaling to the macrophages to support rather than attack tumor cells.”A macrophage can either be a friend or an enemy to cancer cells,” explains DeClerck, who is also a professor of pediatrics at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California. “The cancer communicates with the macrophages, telling them to become friendly. So, the macrophages change their behavior and support the tumor.” In altering the function of surrounding, healthy tissue, the cancer is better able to survive and spread.Related StoriesSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyMother calls for protein shake regulation after daughter diesTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerThe team around DeClerck also shows that cancer cells can use PAI-1 to promote movement of these pro-cancer M2 macrophages into the tumors, where they protect the cancer and repair any damage that chemotherapy may have inflicted. This symbolic one-two punch culminates in a stronger, more difficult-to-treat cancer.DeClerck and his team have uncovered what appears to be a very common mechanism used by many cancers to commandeer part of the body’s immune system. In order to investigate how broadly this cellular communication could impact cancer treatment, DeClerck’s team studied the National Institute of Health’s Cancer Genome Atlas, a library of genetic information from more than 11,000 patient samples, and found that many different cancers have this relationship. “We looked at patient data from neuroblastoma and breast, prostate, colon, and lung cancers. Every time we see higher levels of PAI-1, we see more evidence of pro-cancer M2 macrophages,” says DeClerck.This new understanding of just how PAI-1 communicates with macrophages to change their activity has the potential to alter our approach to cancer treatment since these findings are applicable to most types of cancer. “It is clear that the tumor microenvironment, including cells of the immune system, is crucial in cancer development,” explains Kubala.While cancers vary widely in terms of location, treatment, and survival rates, their manipulation of macrophages represents a common thread, which is important for devising improved treatments for aggressive cancers. “Targeting PAI-1 could be beneficial in cancer,” DeClerck says, “but much more work needs to be done.” He cautions that the answer is not as simple as eliminating PAI-1, which is also made in healthy tissue and is an important part of the blood clotting process. But these results, which uncover a complete pathway of communication between tumors and macrophages, lay the foundation for a promising avenue of research.​​last_img read more

Study reveals immune evasion strategy developed by cytomegaloviruses

first_img Source:https://www.plos.org Apr 8 2019Owl monkey cytomegalovirus produces a decoy molecule A43 to evade detection and destruction by immune cells in their hosts, according to a study published April 4 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Ana Angulo of the University of Barcelona, and colleagues. As the authors note, the findings provide a novel example of an immune evasion strategy developed by viruses. An ingenious viral immune evasion tactic used by the CMV protein A43. Credit: Maria AnguloRelated StoriesNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerMother calls for protein shake regulation after daughter diesHinge-like protein may unlock new pathways for cystic fibrosis treatmentThroughout evolution, cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) have been capturing genes from their hosts, employing the derived proteins to dampen immune responses and successfully persist within their hosts. Certain CMVs encode homologs of CD48, a molecule found on the surface of most of the leukocytes of the body. CD48 binds to the 2B4 receptor on certain immune cells such as natural killer cells, which play a pivotal role in the rapid recognition and control of viral infections. But the properties and biological relevance of the viral CD48 homologs have not been explored. In the new study, Angulo and colleagues have investigated for the first time the immunomodulatory potential of one of these viral molecules: A43, a CD48 homolog encoded by owl monkey CMV.The researchers show that A43 binds strongly to 2B4 and is capable of blocking its interaction with CD48. Moreover, the findings reveal how this viral protein interferes with the function of human natural killer cells. Taken together, these results not only underscore the importance of 2B4-mediated immune responses in controlling CMV infections, but also unveil CD48 as a new viral counteract mechanism for subverting immune surveillance. The authors propose that A43 may serve as a CD48 decoy receptor by binding and masking 2B4, thereby impeding effective immune control by cytotoxic lymphocytes during viral infections. According to the authors, the research highlights the potential of using the inhibitory molecule A43 to develop novel therapeutic tools to manipulate aberrant immune responses, such as those linked to autoimmune diseases.last_img read more

Longer pregnancies increase risk of stillbirths study reveals

first_imgCredit: Tatiana Vdb, Flickr Jul 3 2019The longer a pregnancy continues past 37 weeks gestation, the higher the risk of a stillbirth, according to a new meta-analysis published this week in PLOS Medicine by Shakila Thangaratinam of Queen Mary University of London, UK, and colleagues. Related StoriesScientists study immune molecules inside mycetoma grainsIncreasing awareness about visceral leishmaniasis could help reduce fatalities, disease transmissionNew computational modeling method predicts how gut microbes change over timeOf the 3000 babies stillborn every year in the UK, a third appeared healthy at 37 weeks. In the new work, researchers searched major electronic databases for studies on term pregnancies that included weekly numbers of stillbirths or neonatal deaths. Thirteen studies, providing data on 15 million pregnancies and 17,830 stillbirths, were identified and included in their analysis.The risk of stillbirth increased with gestational age from 0.11 stillbirths per 1000 pregnancies at 37 weeks (95% CI 0.07 to 0.15) to 3.18 stillbirths per 1000 pregnancies at 42 weeks (95% CI 1.84 to 4.35). From 40 to 41 weeks, there was a 64% increase in the risk of stillbirth. Neonatal mortality remained steady in babies born from 38 to 41 weeks, but was significantly higher for babies born at 42 weeks compared to 41 weeks (RR 1.87, 95% CI 1.07 to 2.86, p=0.012).“Any mother considering prolongation of pregnancy beyond 37 weeks should be informed of the additional small but significantly increased risks of stillbirths with advancing gestation,” the authors say. “There is a need to assess the acceptability of early delivery at term to parents and healthcare providers to avoid the small risk of stillbirth. Better stratification of apparently low risk women for complications using individualized prediction models could reduce the number of women who need to be delivered to avoid one additional stillbirth.” Source:PLOSJournal reference:Khalil, A. et al. (2019) Risks of stillbirth and neonatal death with advancing gestation at term: A systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies of 15 million pregnancies. PLOS Medicine. doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1002838.last_img read more

Whacking the mole how Australia scrambles to regulate Chinese technology

first_img This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. China’s Huawei, ZTE blocked from Australia’s 5G network Did you ever go to your local show as a child? Remember that infuriating game where to win you had to hit every mole which popped its head out of a hole? I imagine Australia’s government feels like it’s playing whack-a-mole in regulating Chinese information and communications technology right now. Explore further Citation: Whacking the mole: how Australia scrambles to regulate Chinese technology (2018, September 12) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-09-whacking-mole-australia-scrambles-chinese.htmlcenter_img Provided by The Conversation Where’s the next threat coming from? Whack it! Credit: www.shutterstock.com A clearer policy on regulating information and communications technology in the context of national security threats may help. Though in this version of the game, the stakes are rather higher than cheap toys at the local show. Last month, the Australian government effectively banned Chinese companies Huawei and ZTE from tendering for our national 5G network. This week, the ABC revealed a range of secure locations using surveillance equipment made by Chinese companies which are likely to be banned from providing such equipment to government in the US. One in particular, Hikvision (HIK), has very close links to the Chinese government—42% is owned by state-owned enterprises, and the company is associated with a technology lab inside China’s Ministry of Public Security.The ABC’s investigations showed surveillance equipment being used in a range of locations, from an Australian defence base in South Australia, to Sydney’s Central Station. Critical supply chainsAs a resource-driven economy, Australia is not used to being at the wrong end of critical supply chains. We are familiar with being at the base of the supply chain for critical infrastructure – producing the iron ore, rare earths and coal which make and fuel technology. But recent concerns around regulating the risk from Chinese information and communications technology (ICT) have revealed exactly how uncomfortable it is at the pointy end of this particular supply chain. It’s this user end of the supply chain that the US Department of Homeland Security says is especially vulnerable to foreign espionage. Chinese ICT companies are increasingly at the forefront of discussion about information security and cyber risk in Australia, following the strong US lead in this discussion. In the broader sense, discussions about the risk from Chinese ICT firms are similar to discussions about Chinese investment in critical infrastructure – ports, for example, or gas pipelines. We want to ensure the safety of national assets from the attentions of interests which may not be compatible with our own. But ICT is different. Four reasons ICT is differentFirst, the supply chain is murky. In the case of HIK, for example, its products are often rebadged and on-sold by third parties. And the problem is compounded when software is introduced into the mix. Who in government – state, federal or local – should be responsible for assuring the safety of these devices? Second, where should regulation end? Who is to say whether four components made by a Chinese company in a device make an item vulnerable, but two do not? Can a local council use a HIK camera but a state government must not? Whose job is it to check? Third, the private sector is directly implicated in ICT and cybersecurity more broadly. Purchasing decisions and cybersecurity practices at even the smallest private sector firm can have an impact on national security, especially given the increasing importance of internet-connected devices. Finally, Chinese ICT companies are often the cheapest suppliers of equipment (in part, perhaps, because – like HIK – they have been fuelled by huge Chinese government contracts). This means banning them as suppliers imposes a cost burden on government, the private sector and consumers. Time for actionUnlike the US, whose lead we tend to follow on these issues, Australia has no domestic ICT manufacturing industry and so – for us – there are no domestic winners from regulating purchasing decisions like this. Review of foreign investment in critical infrastructure has recently been upgraded. But ICT has unique and diverse needs. A security camera in Central Station is not the same as a port in Darwin. Government knows this: 2016’s Cyber Security Strategy outlined as one of its goals: “develop guidance for government agencies to consistently manage supply chain security risks for ICT equipment and services.”But the 2017 update on progress in implementing the strategy lists developing such guidance as “not scheduled to have commenced”. Perhaps it should have by now.last_img read more