Keep assault weapons only for police, military

first_imgEnough is enough. I am an advocate of hunting and sport shooting, but assault-style weapons should only be in the hands of the military or police.The National Rifle Association (NRA) needs to make some concessions if it is truly concerned about the safety of the general public, and legislators must stop kowtowing to non-compromising special-interest groups.Preventing just one mass shooting would make stricter legislation worth the effort. Any lawmaker who does not act to get these weapons off the streets is a coward in my eyes.I understand the Second Amendment, but our forefathers could not have envisioned the reality of today. It is no longer 1776.Dan DixonCharltonMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the census Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

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Savills investment arm pulls in £2m

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Newcastle tops league table for fastest-growing office rents

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Retail takes the lead as best property investment

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Edinburgh drives ScotMet

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Scotland: Troubled glen

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Canary says yes to UK’s largest property float

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Parkinson takes Grimley to tribunal

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PREMIUMPrivate insurers unfazed by insurance scandals despite trust concerns

first_imginsurance-companies Jiwasraya Asabri Bumiputera consumer business Forgot Password ? Log in with your social account LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Google Facebook Private insurers have brushed off concerns that scandals involving state-owned insurance companies have hurt the industry as the sector continues to grow despite being clouded by trust issues.Adira Insurance chief executive officer (CEO) Julian Noor said the company still experienced a premium collection growth of about 8 percent year-on-year (yoy) in 2019 despite controversies surrounding state insurer Asuransi Jiwasraya.“This is because the problem is in a state-owned insurer while private ones face no problems. Thus, the public will be smart enough not to generalize and it will be an opportunity for private insurers to offer even better services right now to their customers,” Julian said.Read also: Relaxed foreign ownership rule for insurers could save Jiwasraya: ExpertsJulian’s statement contradicted high-ranking officials who have expressed concern … Topics : Linkedinlast_img read more

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Viral hysteria: Hong Kong panic buying sparks run on toilet paper

first_imgThe footage — and photos of shelves emptied of toilet rolls — sparked a call from the government for the public to halt panic buying. “In response to various rumours recently that there are shortages of goods such as rice and toilet papers, leading to panic buying and even chaos, a government spokesman today expresses regret over the malicious act of spreading rumours when the city is fighting against the disease, and condemns those rumour mongers with evil intentions,” the statement said. While Hong Kong has closed most of its land borders to mainland China, where the coronavirus outbreak began, freight services have not been affected, the government said.”There are sufficient stocks of staple food including rice and pastas. There is no need for the public to worry,” the statement said. Harold Yip, founder of Mil Mill, a Hong Kong-based waste paper recycling company, told AFP they received over 100 enquiries from members of the public about toilet paper on Wednesday alone.RTHK news reported that toilet paper and rice at one supermarket in the district of Wanchai — which had been fully restocked overnight — were cleared within 30 minutes of the store opening on Thursday morning.The supermarket chain Wellcome said rumours of shortages were unfounded. The coronavirus has killed more than 550 people in China since spreading from the central city of Wuhan late last year. Hong Kong now has 21 confirmed infections, including one patient who died.The majority of those infected came from mainland China. But in recent days there has been a spike in carriers with no history of travel to the mainland sparking fears local transmissions were growing.The city’s pro-Beijing leader Carrie Lam has faced growing calls to close the border with China, a step she has been reluctant to take saying it would be economically damaging and discriminatory. Her administration has gradually cut the number of land border crossings to just two.On Wednesday, she announced anyone arriving from the Chinese mainland from Saturday would face a mandatory two-week quarantine. While Hong Kong maintains close economic and cultural links to the Chinese mainland, as seething distrust of the authorities in Beijing permeates the city.The 2003 outbreak of the SARS virus, which Beijing initially covered up, killed 299 people in Hong Kong and left lasting psychological scars on the densely populated city.Lam already boasts record-low approval ratings after using riot police to quell seven months of huge and often violent pro-democracy protests. Topics : Panic buyers in Hong Kong have descended on supermarkets to snap up toilet rolls as the government warned that online rumours of shortages were hampering the city’s fight against a deadly coronavirus outbreak.Videos obtained by AFP showed long queues of frantic shoppers packing trolleys with multiple packets of toilet rolls, with some arguments breaking out.Rice and pasta have also become a popular target for panic buying.last_img read more

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