Aggressive drivers want to take advantage of driverless cars

first_imgAggressive drivers are excited for the outbreak of autonomous cars on public roads, seeing it as a way to bully computers that err on the side of caution, according to new research.The London School of Economics and Goodyear conducted one of the largest surveys to gauge attitudes towards autonomous cars, with 12,000 drivers in 11 countries polled.See Also: Most Americans say they’re ready for an autonomous futureOne of the key findings was aggressive drivers expect autonomous cars to try and accommodate all types of drivers. In a situation where the self-driving system is unsure of the outcome, drivers expect Google, Uber, and Tesla to build systems that avoid accidents at all costs.“I’ll be overtaking all the time because they’ll be sticking to the rules,” said one driver in the survey. “They are going to stop. So you’re going to mug them right off. They’re going to stop and you’re just going to nip round,” said another.Across Europe, U.K. drivers have the most negative view of autonomous cars, according to the survey. 55 percent of U.K. drivers said they were uncomfortable sharing the road with an autonomous car, and 83 percent were concerned the car might malfunction.That’s higher than the average for non-U.K. nations polled, at 39 and 71 percent, respectively.Driverless tech still looking for on ramp anywayAutonomous cars are still an emerging technology that is only available on certain public roads, in certain cities. The U.K. and Germany are leading the race in Europe, followed by France, which recently endorsed some autonomous car tests on public roads.Outside of Europe, the U.S., Singapore, and China are the main hubs for self-driving tests. Baidu, Tencent, and Alibaba are all funding tests, either directly or through startups.In Singapore, nuTonomy, a MIT spin-out, has begun shuttle tests, with a goal of launching the service in 2018. Break the Mold with Real-World Logistics AI and… Tags:#automotive#autonomous cars#driverless cars#featured#Goodyear#Internet of Things#IoT#LSE#Self-Driving#top Related Posts IT Trends of the Future That Are Worth Paying A…center_img 5 Ways IoT can Help to Reduce Automatic Vehicle… For Self-Driving Systems, Infrastructure and In… David Currylast_img read more

Two Bites of Dessert

first_img Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Now I read somewhere once that the maximum amount of pleasure you can derive from eating dessert comes in the first two bites. Any bite beyond the second bite doesn’t increase the pleasure. In fact, it reduces it.The same is true for the distractions and novelties that engage your time and attention. Television is an interesting distraction. There are dozens and dozens of excellent television shows you might watch. Devoting one hour to television each week is one thing, but devoting four hours a day to television is quite another. The Internet isn’t any better. And neither is living in your inbox.I bring this up for one important reason. If you are doing something that doesn’t help further your goals, and does not also create a tremendous amount of value in the way of pleasure, then you are wasting your time.Look at the activities that you engage in. Are you engaged in these activities because they are moving you closer to your goals? Are you doing what speaks to your highest calling? Are you engaged in activities because they create the most value for you and the people you care most about? Is what you do for pleasure really about relationships, the important stuff? If the answer to these questions is no, then you really should be doing something else.There is no such thing as time management, there is only “me management.” What you give your time, your focus, and your full attention to is your experience of life. What you give yourself to will represent the quality of your life and the quality of your contribution.Are you spending time on novelties and distractions and avoiding the work you really should be doing now? Are you sitting down to eat dessert (and nothing but dessert) for hours and hours on end? Two bites is enough. There is no greater pleasure beyond that.Decide what’s most important, and do that instead.last_img read more

Microsoft Surface Headphones are 160 off for Prime Day

first_img Mentioned Above Microsoft Surface Headphones Mobile Accessories Headphones Now playing: Watch this: Best Buy CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Share your voice Preview • Microsoft Surface Headphones: Hands-on with Microsoft’s new Bose-buster noise-canceling headphones Abt Electronics Post a comment $349 $240 $243 See also Review • Surface Headphones review: Microsoft’s first noise-canceling headphones are almost great Enlarge ImageMicrosoft’s Surface Headphones are available in only one color. David Carnoy/CNET When Microsoft released its Surface Headphones last year, I thought it might have trouble selling its first noise-canceling headphones for the same price — $350 — as highly regarded competing products from Bose and Sony. Most stores are now selling them for $250, but for Prime Day, Amazon has them for $190. You can read my full Surface Headphones review here.Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page.Read more: Huge savings on Bose, Beats, Apple headphones and Sonos speakers for Prime Day 2019See it at Amazon News • Microsoft Surface Headphones are $100 off See It Tags See it 2:38 Microsoft Surface Headphones from all angles Best laptops for college students: We’ve got an affordable laptop for every student. Best live TV streaming services: Ditch your cable company but keep the live channels and DVR. 35 Photos See It See It Microsoft Surface Headphones Microsoft Surface Headphones: The surprise noise-canceling… Amazon The best Prime Day deals still available The best Walmart Summer Sale deals still available AirPods, iPads, Apple Watch and MacBooks still on sale Prime Day is over, but these laptop deals aren’t: Big price cuts on Chromebooks, MacBooks and more $349 Amazon Prime Day 0 CNET Deals Amazon Prime Amazon Microsoftlast_img read more

India EU ask Myanmar to implement Annan report

first_imgIndia and the European Union (EU) have urged Myanmar to implement the Kofi Annan-led Rakhine Advisory Commission’s recommendations and work with Bangladesh to return displaced persons to Northern Rakhine state, reports UNB.India and the EU also recognised the role being played by Bangladesh in extending humanitarian assistance to the people in need, according to India-EU joint statement issued during 14th India-EU Summit in New Delhi on Friday.The joint statement was issued after talks among Indian prime minister Narendra Modi, president of the European Council Donald Tusk and president of the European Commission Jean Claude Juncker.India and the EU expressed deep concern at the recent spate of violence in the Rakhine state of Myanmar that has resulted in the outflow of a large number of people from the state, many of whom have sought shelter in neighbouring Bangladesh.Both sides took note that this violence was triggered off by a series of attacks by Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) militants which led to loss of lives among the security forces as well as the civilian population.Both sides recognised the need for ending the violence and restoring normalcy in the Rakhine state without any delay.More than 5,15,000 Rohingyas have so far taken refuge in Bangladesh fleeing persecution in Rakhine state of Myanmar carried out by its military forces since 25 August.last_img read more

Hate Crimes In Houston Go Underreported Rarely Prosecuted

first_img 00:00 /04:11 Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: During the race for Harris County District Attorney, then-candidate Kim Ogg charged DA Devon Anderson with dropping the ball on prosecuting hate crimes. We decided to dig deeper, as part of News 88.7’s year-long initiative, DiverseCity.In 1998, three white men – John William King, Lawrence Russell Brewer, and Shawn Allen Berry – kidnapped a 49-year-old African-American man named James Byrd Jr., in Jasper, Texas. The three chained Byrd to a pick-up truck and dragged him for three miles, killing him. That crime led to the passage of Texas’s hate crimes law in 2001, as well as the federal hate crimes statute, the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act, in 2009. Both raise the level of punishment for any crime in which the victim is targeted because of prejudice.“If we have an aggravated assault, which is a second-degree felony, and we can prove it’s a hate crime, it gets bumped up to a first degree, and we get the higher range of punishment,” says Harris County DA Devon Anderson.Physical evidence alone – say, a bloodstain or a stray fiber – can link an attacker to a victim. But proving hatred as the motive for an attack is often much harder.“We have to prove that the reason that the person or the groups of people were targeted was because of their race, or their color, or their gender, or their national origin. That’s an added element we have to prove,” says Ruben Perez, an assistant U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Texas.Even when an attacker makes finding such proof easy, victims aren’t always willing to cooperate.Conrad Alvin Barrett was driving through Katy in November 2013. He stopped when he saw an elderly black man named Roy Coleman. The following sound is from a video Barrett took on his cellphone, later released to the media:“The plan is to see, if I were to hit a black person, would this be nationally televised?”“How’re you doing? Yeah? Yeah? Knockout!”When Coleman went to a senior’s center the next day, workers there saw he was in agony, his face deformed. They notified his daughter.“He was then taken to the hospital,” says Perez. “Turns out his jaw had been broken in two places. He was missing three teeth. He had not even reported it to the police.”Local and federal investigators got involved. When they took Coleman’s statement, they asked why he hadn’t reported the assault.“He said, ‘When I was growing up, if a white man did something to you, you didn’t say anything. Especially if the police were involved, you didn’t say anything, ’cause it could get worse,’” says Perez.Barrett was ultimately convicted under the Shepard-Byrd Act and sentenced to six years in prison.The Coleman case illustrates another point: some hate crimes are never prosecuted because victims are convinced that speaking up will only bring more unwanted attention, even more attacks.“All of us in this business have known for many years that it certainly appeared that hate crimes were being undercounted,” says Mark Potok, a senior fellow with the Southern Poverty Law Center.Last year, Houston reported 27 hate crimes. That’s far short of what one might expect for a city of Houston’s size. Other large U.S. cities – such as New York, Los Angeles, and Phoenix – reported hundreds.“These crimes are all reported on the basis of individuals reporting to police departments, police departments reporting to the state, and then the state reporting to the FBI. So it’s a completely voluntary reporting system,” Potok says.The Justice Department decided to try to get a more accurate count through statistically representative sampling. Its model revealed that roughly 260,000 hate crimes are committed in the U.S. every year, between 25 to 40 times the number suggested by voluntary reporting. The department is still trying to determine how that breaks down by state and by city.One thing we can tell is how many have resulted in successful prosecutions. Harris County has brought hate crimes charges in six cases under the Texas hate crimes act since 2001. Four have resulted in convictions or plea deals. Two are still pending. Federal prosecutors have won convictions against nine individuals under the Shepard-Byrd Act, not just for Houston but for all of Southern Texas. X Sharelast_img read more

How Houstonians Pronounce Different Words Depends A Lot On Their Age And

first_img Share To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: 00:00 /12:40 X Listen A Rice University researcher is studying how people in Houston speak.Dr. Nancy Niedzielski sees differences in how people say different words based on what part of Houston they’re from, what age they are, and their race.It’s all part of her research for a project called the Houston Urban English Study (HUES).Dr. Niedzielski tells Houston Matters host Craig Cohen about the project, how the way English is spoken is changing, and what makes Houston a particularly interesting place to study dialects.last_img