Middlesex Sheriffs Office Receives State Grant For Popular Youth Summer Camp

first_imgCHELMSFORD, MA — The Middlesex Sheriff’s Office Youth Public Safety Academy (YPSA) will be able to expand its capacity by as many as 100 cadets this summer thanks to a $23,000 grant from the Executive Office of Public Safety and Security (EOPSS), Sheriff Peter J. Koutoujian announced on Wednesday.“Nearly 1,200 youngsters have applied to YPSA this year, and the continuing success of the camp comes from our terrific partnerships with our fellow law enforcement and government agencies,” said Sheriff Koutoujian. “Thanks to the Baker Administration and EOPSS, we will be able to hire two extra counselors and purchase the additional equipment necessary to accept 100 more cadets over the course of the summer. This grant will make a real difference in the lives of these youngsters who may not otherwise be able to attend YPSA.”This marks the second consecutive year the Middlesex Sheriff’s Office (MSO) has been awarded the grant through the Commonwealth’s Law Enforcement and Youth Partnerships Summer Day Program. The initiative, administered by EOPSS, is designed to support summer recreational and educational learning opportunities with local law enforcement.“We are honored to partner with the Middlesex Sheriff’s Office to allow more young people to take part in this valuable program,” said Secretary of Public Safety and Security Thomas Turco. “Creating strong, positive relationships between law enforcement and the community is a priority for us and one that is clearly shared by Sheriff Koutoujian and his team.”YPSA is a week-long camp designed for children ages 8-12 who live in Middlesex County. Cadets spend the week with MSO staff as well as police officers and firefighters from their hometown, forming important bonds with their local law enforcement officials. Cadets also participate in classroom and practical activities designed to teach them important public safety skills including a simulated fire safety trailer offered by the Massachusetts Department of Fire Services, a challenge course held at the Boys & Girls Club of Greater Billerica, and demonstrations offered by the MSO and partner agencies.The Academy is run at the MSO Training Academy in Chelmsford, with transportation, breakfast and lunch provided for each cadet. YPSA runs for six, one-week sessions each summer. Spots remain available for cadets in several communities including, but not limited to, Arlington, Bedford, Belmont, Cambridge, Hudson, Maynard, Natick, Newton, Waltham and Watertown. Families can register their children by going to https://www.middlesexsheriff.org/ypsa.(NOTE: The above press release is from the Middlesex Sheriff’s Office.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedAttorney General Awards Middlesex Sheriff’s Office A Healthy Summer Youth Jobs GrantIn “Police Log”51 Wilmington Students Graduate From Middlesex Sheriff’s Youth Public Safety AcademyIn “Government”Middlesex Sheriff’s Office Awarded State Grant To Help Support Youth Public Safety AcademyIn “Police Log”last_img read more

Ferdousi Priyabhashini no more

first_imgFerdousi PriyabhashiniFreedom fighter and noted sculptor Ferdousi Priyabhashini passed away at a hospital in Dhaka on Tuesday.She was 71.Priyabhashini was undergoing treatment at the coronary care unit (CCU) of Labaid Hospital following a cardiac arrest.She had been suffering from multiple complications, including kidney and heart diseases.Officials at the hospital said Priyabhashini was admitted to the hospital on 23 February. She was then suffering from kidney complications.Ferdousi Priyabhashini was born in Khulna on 19 February 1947. During Bangladesh’s War of Independence in 1971, she was tortured by the Pakistani military.For her sacrifice during the freedom fight, the government awarded her the Independence Award, the highest civilian award of the country in 2016.last_img

Iran denounces US and Saudi sanctions against Hezbollah

first_imgAn image grab taken from al-Manar TV on May 14, 2018, shows the leader the Lebanon`s Shiite Hezbollah movement Hassan Nasrallah giving a televised speech at an unknown location on May 14, 2018. Photo : AFPIran’s foreign minister on Thursday lashed out on Twitter at the US and Saudi Arabia for imposing sanctions on leaders of its Lebanese ally Hezbollah.”Israeli snipers shoot over 2,000 unarmed Palestinian protestors on a single day,” Mohammad Javad Zarif said in a tweet referring to protests and clashes in the Gaza Strip that killed some 60 people this week.The “Saudi response, on eve of Ramadan? Collaboration with its US patron to sanction the first force to liberate Arab territory and shatter the myth of Israeli invincibility. Shame upon shame,” he said.The United States and six Gulf Arab states announced sanctions Wednesday on the leadership of Hezbollah, as Washington seeks to step up economic pressure on Iran and its allies in the region after president Donald Trump withdrew this month from the 2015 nuclear deal.The US and Saudi-led Terrorist Financing and Targeting Center said the sanctions were aimed at Hezbollah’s Shura Council, the powerful Lebanese group’s decision-making body, led by its secretary general Hassan Nasrallah.Nasrallah, Hezbollah deputy secretary general Naim Qasim, and three other Shura Council members were listed under the joint sanctions, which aim at freezing vulnerable assets of those named and blocking their access to global financial networks.At the same time, the six Gulf members of the TFTC — Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates — declared sanctions on another nine individuals and firms part of or linked to Hezbollah that were already blacklisted by the US Treasury.Hezbollah is a key player in Lebanese politics, and it maintains its own arsenal of weapons and fighting force.The group is fighting in Syria alongside president Bashar al-Assad’s military, and it has trained Iraqi Shiite militias which participated in retaking territory from the Islamic State group.The sanctions by Gulf states follow two US moves this month to put pressure on Iran’s financial networks, including sanctions announced Tuesday aimed at an alleged financial pipeline that moved “hundreds of millions of dollars” from Iran’s central bank through an Iraqi bank to Hezbollah.The European Union has viewed Hezbollah’s armed wing as a “terrorist” organisation since 2013.In 2016, the six Arab Sunni powers of the Gulf Co-operation Council — Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Qatar and Oman – designated Hezbollah a “terrorist” organisation.last_img

Teachers Report Stressed Anxious Students In The Age Of Trump

first_imgThis past spring, a history teacher in North Carolina was giving a lesson about Christopher Columbus. He covered how Columbus and his men enslaved and otherwise mistreated the native people of the island of Hispaniola.One white student piped up: “Well, that’s what needed to happen. They were just dumb people anyways like they are today. That was the purpose, that’s why we need a wall.”Multiple students agreed. An argument ensued. After class, two Latina students came up to the teacher and said: “He doesn’t need to be saying stuff like that in class. We are worried for our well-being. We’re worried about things not going good for us.”The anonymous anecdote was collected as part of a new UCLA survey. In it, teachers report that in the current political climate, some of their students fear for themselves and their families. Others reported that students seem more “emboldened” to express racist and derogatory views.Even as the first lady spent time this week touring schools to promote caring and inclusion, many are ready to chalk up a new incivility in schools to the Age of Trump.Previous surveys we’ve reported on, including one from the Southern Poverty Law Center, also found increases in school bullying related to overheated political rhetoric.The UCLA survey, unlike those, relies on a nationally representative sample: 1,535 teachers at schools whose demographics reflect those of U.S. schools as a whole, rather than pulling from self-selecting volunteers. Also, the survey was conducted after President Trump took office. Along with the survey, researchers at the UCLA Institute for Democracy, Education and Accessconducted 35 follow-up interviews by phone.Here are some of the key findings:79 percent of teachers reported that students have expressed concerns for their well-being or the well-being of their families because of what is in the news. Most commonly mentioned was immigration, but the list also included the much-publicized travel ban, restrictions on LGBTQ rights, threats to the Affordable Care Act and threats to the environment.51 percent of teachers reported more students experiencing “high levels of stress and anxiety.”44 percent of teachers reported that students’ concerns were affecting learning. In interviews, they spoke about students who seemed stressed, distracted and who were contributing less to class discussion for fear of drawing attention to themselves.41 percent of teachers reported that students were more likely than in previous years to introduce unfounded claims in class discussions, such as from Facebook or talk radio.27 percent of teachers reported an increase in students making derogatory remarks about other groups during class discussions. This included sexist as well as racist and anti-Muslim comments.20 percent of teachers reported heightened polarization on campus and incivility in their classrooms.These last two figures were higher for teachers at predominantly white schools, says John Rogers, lead author of the report and a professor at UCLA’s graduate school of education. He noted that teachers in eight states used the word “emboldened” to describe some white students’ increasingly racist and offensive behavior.The report is not comprehensive, and there’s no easy way to compare its results with those during any previous administration. But it speaks to an ongoing national discussion about civil discourse and civic engagement inside and outside the classroom.White nationalists like Richard Spencer are coming to college campuses purporting to embody free speech, even as their supporters commit violence.Former President George W. Bush, and retiring Repubican Sen. Jeff Flake, each in a recent speech drew a line between the rhetoric that flies on Twitter and television, and what students in school are learning about the bounds of acceptability.“Bullying and prejudice in our public life sets a national tone, provides permission for cruelty and bigotry, and compromises the moral education of children,” Bush said. “The only way to pass along civic values is to first live up to them.”“It is often said that children are watching. Well, they are,” said Flake.Ron Avi Astor, who researches school climate at the University of Southern California, follows Rogers’ work closely. He cautions that teachers may have a “really different” view of what is going on in their schools than students do.A high school teacher, for example, may have 200 students in the course of a day, Astor explains. And if she sees problems happening with one or two of them, that doesn’t necessarily generalize to every student in a school.However, he says the results of this survey conform with what he has been seeing in the field and hearing from administrators and teachers.Astor says he has seen schools in Los Angeles, where he lives and does research, taking steps to protect students who are worried about immigration crackdowns.“You don’t need a big study to know that kids turn on the TV and they see and hear the nastiness that’s going on,” he says.UCLA’s Rogers says the survey suggests that the political climate may be chilling classroom debate. “Teachers said they avoided talking about topics they otherwise would discuss, or had lessons that were more controlling and less engaging than in the past.”One teacher said, “I’d been trained to bring all different student perspectives into the discussion, but I don’t quite know what to do when it creates a threat for other students or undermines a sense of community in my classroom.”Teachers told the UCLA researchers that they wanted more professional development and more leadership from their administrators on how to balance these concerns. “It would be troubling,” says Rogers, “if the lesson was that schools need to back away from civic and political life.” Sharelast_img read more

Memories of home

first_imgRedefining the idea of home when all is lost and when borders are etched between lands and people, this is what Sheba Remy Kharbanda and William Charles Moss’s documentary is all about. To be screened from 14 to 21 November in India Habitat Centre, Five Rivers: A Portrait of Partition is  a documentary in Cyclorama featuring a video art installation by these multi-disciplinary artists.  The documentary illustrates the intimate complexities of ‘home’. Staged inside a traditional Indian wedding tent, this cycloramic screening marries culture-bridging conventions of storytelling to the stimulation of a sculptural installation. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Projected footage occupies conducting a blend  of five synchronized films that craft the narrative of Amrik Singh, a Punjabi/Afghani Sikh who at age nine left his childhood home to migrate alongside millions across the Indian Subcontinent in the months preceding the Partition of India in 1947. Singh’s introspective recollections carry an  invitation for participants to trace his turbulent journey to redefine home across the sudden and stark borders created by the establishment of Pakistan and India as independent states. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixClearly visible on the white textile of the tent from both inside and outside the structure, these  interviews, landscapes, and historical documentation are fostered by a pervasive soundtrack of contemporary punjabi and urdu poetry, testimony, and speeches that imbibe the space with a strong sense of the memory.The artiste, Sheba Remy Kharbanda is a metaphysician, filmmaker and storyteller born in London to immigrants from the Punjabi. In 2005, she launched the Foreign Land Project, a documentary film and online oral history archive that chronicles the stories of elder women from the Punjab, who, after partition of India, left for England in search of work and a new home. In May, 2014, her essay entitled, A Lesson in Love was published in the anthology, Her Name Is Kaur: Sikh American Women Write about Love, Courage, and Faith. With Five Rivers, Kharbanda seeks to weave threads through questions of identity, displacement and memory – questions she continues to grapple with and which she feels are her ancestral inheritance.William Charles Moss is a photographer and cinematographer who began in the feature film industry almost twenty years ago, before discovering the world of documentary film, which has since become his passion. Together with Kharbanda, he runs Callejero Films, a Brooklyn-based video production company. When: 14-21? NovWhere: India Habitat Centre Timing: 5.30 pm onwardslast_img read more

Blend of art and commerce

first_imgIndian textiles and fashion-wear has been receiving accolades from all over the world, since the ancient times. To give the foreign exporters a closer experience of the same, Greater Noida saw an elaborate arrangement for domestic textile manufacturers to showcase their art, this weekend. A two-day mega exhibition was organised by Surat Dreams at the Expo Mart to promote Indian textile. The motto of this event was to uphold Indian textiles in the foreign market and as well as throughout the country as a contribution to PM Modi’s ‘Make in India’ and ‘Skill India’ mission. With 108 exhibitors from all over the country participating in the event, a perfect blend of art and commerce took place at the Expo Mart this weekend. Over 3300 domestic and international buyers from UK, USA, Bangladesh, Pakistan, South Africa and the Gulf countries were present, who helped in generating an estimated amount of Rs 700 crore MOU. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The exhibition enabled manufacturers to reach their target sellers for women’s wear and spread their creation worldwide without the menace of middlemen. The collection exhibited were all women’s wear, from stylish dresses to bridal wear; every woman’s dream wardrobe collection was presented for the domestic and the international buyers. The exhibited fashion clothing was not only ethnic but also had some western wears. Traditional lehengas, suits, sarees and fusion dresses were also for display. The exhibition served as a great platform for all the manufacturers and buyers to exchange ideas and discuss the latest trends and styles. This platform had been a meeting of dealers, traders, exporters as well as fashion designers.  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe exhibition also showcased high profile fashion shows featuring top models endorsing the latest ensembles from the ethnic couture presented by 30 textile manufacturers in the two-day event.One of the four co-founders of Surat Dreams, Hitesh Jain said, “This is the first time that we are doing our textile exhibition at Greater Noida, and the splendid response from the foreign buyers made it the most successful event of Surat Dreams. With this exhibition we hope to create history in the coming years of fashion industry by going a step ahead to promote export of textiles.” Similar events had been structured by the company since 2010 but the first event in Greater Noida has proved to be splendidly effective.last_img read more

Deutsche Telekom has launched a new iPhone app cal

first_imgDeutsche Telekom has launched a new iPhone app called Shair that enables users to discuss shows they watch with Facebook contacts, as well as the possibility to make comments on shows in real time.The Shair app enables users to access synopses and other background information about shows as well as information on directors and actors. The app can currently identify shows on 15 channels carried by Telekom’s IPTV service including services from ARD, ZDF, RTL and ProSiebenSat.1.Telekom cited a recent study by Bitkom showing that about 50% of TV viewers use the internet to obtain additional information at the same time via laptops, smartphones or tablets.last_img