Vocativ Eliminates Entire Editorial Staff

first_img Employees were notified Wednesday morning that the company has begun a pivot to “focus exclusively on video content,” a Vocativ spokesperson tells Folio: in a statement that bears a number of similarities to the one given by Time Inc. CEO Rich Battista following that company’s own round of layoffs yesterday. A Vocativ spokesperson provided Folio: the following statement: Vocativ, the four-year-old digital media brand that made a name for itself by “mining the deep web” for original storytelling, terminated its entire editorial staff today, Folio: has learned. — Joe Lemire (@LemireJoe) June 14, 2017 It’s not clear at this time exactly how many staffers were let go, but a Google Sheet shared on Twitter indicates at least 21 “free agents” following the staff cuts. “Since its founding in late 2013, Vocativ has pioneered a new form of digital journalism using our proprietary technology to tell award-winning stories across a range of formats including on our website, social media and television. As the industry evolves, we are undertaking a strategic shift to focus exclusively on video content that will be distributed via social media and other platforms. The tremendous success we’ve experienced since our launch in both long- and short-form video has positioned us well for this evolution.” Vocativ has terminated its editorial team, and I am a free agent, effective immediately. I’d love to write for all of you. Email in bio. Founded in 2013, Vocativ primarily differentiates itself from other outlets through its use of a proprietary platform known as Verne, which the company has said allows it to scour the web to uncover stories other news agencies overlook. Vocativ scored its first TV deal, with MSNBC, in 2014, followed by an eight-part series airing on Showtime, “Dark Web,” which premiered last year. Getting laid off today, worked with an amazing team at Vocativ but now owners are “pivoting” to all video — Jessica Leber (@jessleber) June 14, 2017 A lot of wonderful and talented people got laid off at Vocativ today. Here’s all their contact info. Hire them: https://t.co/oQMun8JLJg— Ryan Beckler (@RyanBeckler) June 14, 2017last_img read more

Tesla Model Y crossover SUV unveiled

first_img34:37 The success or failure of the Model Y could make or break Tesla. If the vehicle appeals to buyers who hadn’t previously been interested in a sedan like the Model 3 and couldn’t afford a Model X, then it’s all gravy. Of course, that also depends on whether Tesla is able to decide officially where to build it and whether it can build the vehicle without the pronounced quality issues it suffered with the Model 3 (and the Model X and S before it). If Tesla isn’t able to deliver on its promises or the vehicle ends up sharing much less in terms of parts with the Model 3 than expected, then it could go very badly. Based on aesthetics alone, though, that doesn’t look to be an issue. It’s worth remembering, however, that when the Model X was announced, it was supposed to share the bulk of its parts with the Model S, but ended up only sharing around 30 percent. In any case, we now live in a world where Elon Musk has lived out his “S3XY” fantasy and made us all his accomplices in it. We’re looking forward to getting behind the wheel of the Model Y just as soon as we can pry one away from the folks at Tesla, but until then, keep an eye on Roadshow for more Model Y news as it happens. Enlarge ImageHere it is, Tesla’s Model Y, and it looks… pretty much like we expected it to. Tesla Tesla’s Model Y has finally been unveiled to the public, and while the Model 3-based crossover SUV is pretty much what we expected, there’s still a lot here to sink our teeth into. The Model Y has a little bit of a Model X feel about it– including an unexpected optional third-row seating option — minus its big brother’s controversial Falcon doors. Mainly, however, there’s a whole lot of Model 3 DNA and visuals in the 2020 Model Y. In fact, the latter is why it’s arguably Tesla’s least-innovative new vehicle ever. However, that probably doesn’t matter much, and it could actually be a good thing: Given that consumer interest in crossover SUVs is at a fever pitch these days, this new offering is likely to become the brand’s best-selling model when it finally hits the streets late next year. As Musk announced via Twitter recently, Model Y pricing starts at around 10 percent over what a comparably equipped Model 3 does while offering a usable range of approximately 300 miles. This works out to a $39,000 standard-range model, which Musk says is due in 2021, and a long-range model, which will cost $47,000 and go on sale in fall 2020.  What you get in trade is a slightly more family- and cargo-friendly shape and the smug satisfaction that you’ve got the newest Tesla on your block. Plus, given that the Model Y is based on the Model 3, this baby crossover will undoubtedly be pretty quick, as previewed in our early ride-along from Thursday’s reveal event seen below. Tesla Model 3: The one you’ve been waiting for Our first ride in the Tesla #ModelY pic.twitter.com/XLCjI4vGDG— Roadshow (@roadshow) March 15, 2019 Comments Tesla Model 3 Review: Performance trim Tesla pulls the wraps off its Model Y crossover SUV Elon Musk unveils the Tesla Model Y 9 Photoscenter_img Tags Now playing: Watch this: 2019 Tesla Model S Long Range review: Familiar, yet oh so much better Tesla Share your voice More From Roadshow 47 Electric Cars Car Industry SUVs Crossovers Elon Musk Teslalast_img read more

Heres what India Inc thinks about the retaliatory tariff on 29 US

first_imgThe Narendra Modi government has retaliated with tariffs on 29 American products after the US ended India’s trade concession of about $5.6 billion under the Generalised System of Preferences (GSP). The market has been heating up with pressure which followed 290 points fall in the Sensex after the announcement.India will be implementing duties as high as 70 per cent on perishable items like almonds and apples as a response to Washington’s denial to exempt Delhi from the taxes on steel and aluminium imports. Around $543 million worth of U.S almonds were bought by India.ReutersLooking at the rising tensions by the US-India trade relations, many analysts commented on the sudden retaliation. Here’s how some analysts reacted:The Reactions:The Director-General and CEO of the Federation of Indian Export Organisations (FIEO), Ajay Sahi, said that there will be negligible impact on the US by the tariff hike of $400-450 million over a bilateral trade of $142 billion.International Monetary Fund (IMF) showed serious concerns stating that the global economy cannot sustain another trade war as the economic growth is already at a standstill because of the US-China issues. ReutersDeepak Jasani of HDFC Securities told IANS, “Local investors will be worried as to how the US could react to this. However, FIIs will wait for any such move by the US before feeling the Indian market.” He also added that the US farmers will be affected by the tariffs on walnut, almond, and apples, which might trigger a negative response for the Indian market.Mayuresh Joshi of Angel Broking stated his concerns about the retaliation leading to an increase in the number of products in the tariff list. He said that the retaliation might hurt investor sentiments and majorly impact the capital markets. He said, “Investors will get into trouble if the additional tariffs are applied.”India is the world’s third-largest economy but is US’s 13th largest export market. At the same time, the US is India’s largest export market.last_img read more

India Sothebys International Realty expands its horizons

first_imgIndia Sotheby’s International Realty announced their entry into the eastern Indian market with the opening of their new office in Kolkata, recently. With this latest addition, the company now has a total of three offices including that in New Delhi and Mumbai, and further is in the process of opening of three or four more offices in 2019 across India. Additionally, the company also manages the Sri Lanka operations for the ultra-prestige residential development ‘Sapphire Residences’ by ITC Hotels. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfCommenting on the expansion plan of the comapny, Amit Goyal, CEO, India Sotheby’s International Realty said, “We are thrilled to expand our presence across the country, with the opening of our third office in Kolkata. This city is full of some the most exclusive and breath-taking properties that cover the length and breadth of the evolution of Indian architecture. And, we are looking forward to represent local clients and investors by offering them high-end luxury real estate solutions.” Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveSituated in one of Kolkata’s prime location, Salt Lake City – the Kolkata office is spread across 2800 square feet, and comprises of eight highly experienced professionals. The team which comes with people having decades of experience in various fields, is led by Udayendu Dass, who has over 34 years of experience in Ultra HNI Business Banking, Financial Services Advisory, Lifestyle Business, Telecom and Exports. The Kolkata office will comprise of some very exerienced people like Avijeet Das, Shivani Kapur, Vikram Kapoor, Sujit Kumar Ghosh, among others – who come with a varied experience across sectors such as Tourism and Hospitality, Real Estate, Banking, FMCG, and Business Management. The venture in Kolkata will be catering to the burgeoning real estate requirement across Eastern India, with a focused view to bring the best realty options to our global audiences. According to the Director International, Akash Puri, the Kolkata office will also help clients in buying a home in preferred overseas destinations like UK, Dubai, USA, Italy through the global network.last_img read more

Harness the Power of Freemium

first_img Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. On the Web, services such as Google, Facebook, and Twitter are the undisputed kings of free, providing robust services at no charge to users. But a host of other companies use free in a much more traditional way–as an enticement for paid upgrades. The model is known as freemium, and while it may not make headlines, proponents say it can make millions. Unfortunately, finding the right balance between free and paid in the freemium model can leave a new business in uncharted waters, with few hard and fast rules to follow. Here, three entrepreneurs using the freemium model with services in different stages of development explain how it’s being implemented in their businesses, and how it might be implemented in yours as well.Set expectations from the beginningIf paid web services have an evangelist, it may very well be Jason Fried, partner at 37signals, a web-based software company that offers a suite of online applications. Basecamp, the company’s flagship product, helps companies of all sizes collaborate on projects with their clients through a simple but powerful web interface. The privately held company is tight-lipped about revenue, but with more than 3 million user accounts in Basecamp alone, Fried says that both revenue and profit are in “the multi-million dollar area.”As for when a web service should start charging, Fried’s answer is simple: immediately. Charging from the outset tells users that the product has a specific value, Fried says. Trying to charge for something that was previously free can undermine the product’s value, causing potential customers to ask why the service is suddenly worth more than it was in the past.”My feeling is that you should begin charging right from the start…The longer something is free, the less it’s worth,” he says.Chris Nagele, principal at Wildbit, offers a slightly different perspective. Starting as a free service can work, he says, if the addition of paid plans is done correctly. His company’s flagship product, Beanstalk a version control service that helps software developers and designers track and save changes to a project, launched with only a free plan, but that free plan came with the understanding that paid plans would soon be available.When the paid plans launched, the free plan was left unchanged. The new plans simply offered more features for a higher monthly fee. Adding a price only works if you’re adding value as well, Nagele says.Scratch your own itch to find a compelling productWhen creating a service that users will pay for, the best source of inspiration is often to solve your own problem, according to Fried.37signals began as a web design firm, but in working with clients Fried and his partners became frustrated with existing project management software. They developed Basecamp for their own use before offering it to the public in 2004. As a result, the company stopped doing contract work a year later. It now devotes 100 percent of its efforts to developing and supporting its own applications.”We consider ourselves the target, and then we go out and find other people who are exactly like us,” he says.Sachin Agarwal, CEO of Posterous, tells a similar story. He and his co-founder, Garry Tan, wanted an easy to use, premium blogging platform for their own use. The result was a service in which creating (or updating) a blog is as simple as sending an email. (Try it by e-mailing post@posterous.com.) Attachments of almost any kind–images, videos, audio–are automatically converted and posted along with any text.The 15-month-old startup has yet to generate revenue, but plans to introduce paid features to complement its free offerings, Agarwal says.Find the natural break pointsUnfortunately, creating the product is often the easy part, at least for those companies that already possess adequate technical talent. Splitting a product into free and paid tiers that provide sufficient value to users while turning a profit–creating a sustainable business, in other words–is more difficult, and sometimes comes down to trial and error.At 37signals, Fried says, he and his partners look for the natural “break points” in a product, and create tiers accordingly. Basecamp, for instance, specializes in project management, so each paid plan is distinguished by the number of projects it allows a user to create. The free plan limits users to one project. The Basic plan, at $24 per month, increases that limit to 15 projects, and so on.”The best advice I can give regarding pricing is this: Have a price. Don’t be afraid to charge for your work. And make it a number you’d pay yourself,” he says.With Beanstalk, plans are differentiated by the number of storage repositories that users can create, and the amount of overall storage space available to them. The free plan limits users to one repository with 100 megabytes of total storage, while the first paid plan ups that to 10 repositories with 3 gigabytes of total storage for $15 per month.Beanstalk’s paid plans are further separated from the free plan by the ability to deploy completed software to production servers, and the use of encryption for greater security. The latter two features have been the most common reasons users cite when upgrading, Nagele says.The company did quite a bit of research into prices at other services and did its best to estimate potential costs when creating its price structure, but in the end, some of those decisions were simply educated guesses, Nagele says.”There’s no real how to for it, because there’s so many conditions,” he says.Posterous plans to charge only for those advanced features needed by businesses and the most technically advanced users, and for storage space greater than that offered in the free plan, according to Agarwal.Understand who will payNagele says that some decisions about pricing are directed by the audience that a particular service is using. Services that target businesses or professional audiences usually have an easier time converting users to paid plans than services that target consumers.Beanstalk currently converts “upwards of 10 percent” of its users to its paid plans, Nagele says, no small feat considering that rates as low as one percent are not uncommon. The service targets small to medium sized businesses, and it became profitable soon after its launch. Its most expensive plan costs $200 per month.Fried declined to give exact numbers on the percentage of paid accounts among 37signals products. But he did say that “free accounts outnumber paid accounts,” and the company has “more paying customers who started as paying customers than paying customers who upgraded from free plans.”The goal at Posterous has always been to serve as large an audience as possible with the free product, Sachin says, while charging a minority of users for advanced features. Though some question the value of serving nonpaying users, he sees the larger audience as a way to inspire development of new features.”That’s where we drive a lot of passion for the product from…That’s what makes us happy, what we would call success.”When considering which features should be free and which should be paid, Agarwal likes to use “the mom factor.””Does my mom need this for Posterous to be useful for her? If so, I think it should be free. If a feature is only important to a smaller group of advanced people, then it’s something we can charge for without making the service less useful for the masses,” he says.Focus on the basicsAs a startup that plans to serve large numbers of free users, Posterous keeps costs as low as possible, Agarwal says. When it was time to lease office space, the company passed on the trendy area next to Twitter’s offices in San Francisco, settling instead on a much less expensive space in the North Beach area. Posterous is operated by three full-time employees and one contractor, and the company intends to grow no faster than it needs to.Fried says too many businesses–both online and off–get distracted with things that don’t matter, whether focusing on wasted employee policies, scheduling unnecessary meetings, or worrying too much about branding. What’s important is to build a great product that’s worth more than you charge for it, he says.For Nagele, it all comes down to value.”A lot of this stuff is really just fundamental old school business models, you know. We’re entering a space where a lot this stuff seems unique, but in the end it’s all about how much value you’re offering, and if you can offer enough value people are probably willing to pay for it,” Nagele says. Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now Yes, You Can Build Your Own Web App Entrepreneur Assist More on Web Services Enroll Now for Free 8 min read September 10, 2009 This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience.last_img read more

Australia Tourisms Canada numbers leaping forward like roo

first_imgTags: Australia << Previous PostNext Post >> Jean Sorensen Australia Tourism’s Canada numbers leaping forward like ‘roo Friday, June 9, 2017 center_img Share VANCOUVER — Australia has been a runaway destination for North Americans as it heads into 2017, coming off unprecedented visitor stats in 2016. Now Tourism Australia is attempting to trigger new incentives for travel agents that will keep the numbers moving forward like bounding kangaroo.“We had an extraordinary year. North America has seen unprecedented momentum,” said Tourism Australia’s Robert Keddy, Head of Commercial Partnerships for the Americas, who was in Vancouver to give an industry update to travel agents at the Blue Water Cafe.Canadian travel figures climbed in 2016 to 152,000 for an 8% increase over 2015. U.S. figures also ramped up to 720,000, a 21% increase. Keddy said the North America market is now Australia’s third largest in terms of global arrival numbers. And in 2017 Australia is projecting that Canada and the U.S. will send 1,000,000+ visitors to its shores.Goway’s Janette Purdham, a South Pacific specialist, and Vincent Tong, sales agent, sample Australian wines at a Tourism Australia industry update event held at the Blue Water Cafe in Vancouver’s trendy Yaletown area. Photo credit: Jean SorensenThere is every indication that North American will reach that goal. Stats for the 12 months leading up to March 2017 have seen 158,000 Canadian visitors for an 11% increase over the same period a year earlier. For the month of March there was a 22% rise in Canadian visitors. Australia is seeing the same kind of increase in arrivals from the U.S.Keddy said he is now trying to determine what factors influence Canadians and North Americas to pick Australia as a vacation spot. “It is important to determine what drives people,” he said.More news:  Le Boat has EBBs along with its new 2020 brochureResearch collected so far indicates that Canadians are motivated by the perception that Australia is a safe and secure county, provides good value for money, has vibrant cities and friendly individuals and good food and is culturally rich with interesting history.While U.S. travellers share the same concern for safety, their main drivers are the natural outdoors and wildlife as well as the cuisine. Value for the dollar was at the bottom of the main five motivators.Keddy said Tourism Australia is currently looking at how to use what it calls ‘User Generated Content’, or UGC, made up of thousands of photos and video clips generated by travellers every day and posted on Tourism Australia’s social media channels.  He showed the Vancouver agents gathered at the event a sampling of the brilliant photos and videos, all taken by visitors.Keddy said he is hoping to develop a program that will allow travel partners and/or travel agents to access some of these photos and video clips through Tourism Australia’s website Australia.com, to encourage clients to travel to the country.On hand to promote Australia and its adventure travel product was Michael Mullin, Western Canadian sales executive for Tourism Australia.Tourism Australia revamped its Aussie Specialist Program a year ago with new training material and videos, with the goal of creating a more appealing learning experience. Some 11,117 Canadian travel agents have enrolled in the program and 655 have completed it. Those figures represent a 79% enrolment increase and a 54% completion increase versus a year ago. The program is also aimed at providing the information that travel agents need to sell.More news:  Kory Sterling is TL Network Canada’s new Sales Manager Canada“It is important that we are out there driving that demand,” Keddy said.In the U.S. Tourism Australia has launched a trial program which has it working more closely with individual commercial partners.  Keddy said he hopes the program will be replicated in Canada in the latter part of 2017 or early 2018.Keddy supplied 2016 Canadian air carrier statistics as well. They showed Air Canada leading with 32% of travellers, Qantas at 13%, Air New Zealand at 11%, United Airlines at 7%, Cathay Pacific at 6%, Jetstar at 4%, Virgin Australia at 4%. Other airlines accounted for the remaining 23%.One of Australia’s attractions for Canadians is the diversity of its cuisine and spirits. Seafood was paired with Australian wines and beer at Tourism Australia’s industry update session in Vancouver.Tourism Australia’s target market for travellers is the 45+ age group, said Keddy. “Our target group is the 45+ people who are adventurous.  They have travelled outside North America at least once and they are experience driven,” he said.This target market has chosen Australia become of its diversity of experiences, from the famous Sydney BridgeClimb to relaxing beach time.Among the new experiences attracting Canadians in growing numbers are indigenous tours and excursions. “Australia has one of the oldest indigenous cultures in the world,” said Keddy, adding that the culture dates back 40,000 years. Unique tours include mud crabbing in northern Queensland with an indigenous family on the mud flats.Equally interesting experiences can be found in urban areas where indigenous guides provide tours of botanical gardens, providing insight into how people used the plants in their daily lives. “They (travellers) want experiences that have brag-ability,” said Keddy. Posted bylast_img read more